By on October 19, 2021

Honda

The next Honda Civic Si is here, and on paper, it seems to keep the flame going nicely.

Not just in terms of performance specs, but also in terms of how the Si tends to differentiate itself from other Civics. This Si appears to be similar to the previous-gen car in terms of how it’s set apart from the lineup.

Well, there is one difference — the car appears to offer a bit more in terms of niceties, when it comes to comfort and convenience features, than previous versions.

For example, Si is offered with a 9-inch touchscreen for infotainment, wireless Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, and Bose audio system as standard.

Honda

Ah, but you care about the performance stuff. Here it is: An updated 1.5-liter turbocharged four-cylinder (2oo horsepower, 192 lb-ft of torque) with a lighter flywheel and what Honda claims are broader power curves, suspension changes that are meant to improve both ride and handling, a 60-percent stiffer torsion bar for the steering system, a short-throw 6-speed manual transmission that uses the same rev-matching system as the Civic Type R, a limited-slip differential, and a new drive mode that customizes settings for the individual driver.

Honda

Of course, the Si wouldn’t be the Si without certain appearance and styling bits. In this case, it means a more aggressive front bumper and a rear bumper that’s been changed to show off the exhaust tips. There’s a front spoiler hidden under the car and a black rear spoiler in plain sight. Gloss-black trim adorns the sideview mirrors and window surrounds, and LED head- and taillights are standard. The standard 18-inch wheels are matte black with 10 spokes, and a new orange color is available for Sis — and only Sis.

Honda

Inside, the car gets Si-specific sport seats with Si logos, and there is red contrast stitching throughout the cabin. The gauge cluster includes a 7-inch display screen.

Honda

Honda claims an 8 percent increase in torsional rigidity and a 13 percent increase in bending rigidity. The rear track is widened by half an inch and the wheelbase is 1.4 inches longer. Spring rates are increased by 8 percent upfront and 54 percent in the rear, and new dampers are tuned specifically for the Si. The front MacPherson struts have reinforced upper mounts. The 27 mm front hollow stabilizer bar and 18 mm rear solid stabilizer bar are both thicker than before.

Honda

Stiffer front and rear bushings are borrowed from the Type R, along with rear upper arms and lower B-arms.

Adding more “go” necessitates adding more “whoa”, so the car gets bigger brakes than regular Civics — 12.3-inch rotors up front (+1.2) and 11.1-inch units in the rear (+0.9 inches). Summer tires are optional, otherwise, all-seasons are standard.

Honda

The company’s HondaSensing suite of safety tech is standard, too.

The 2022 Honda Civic Si will be built in Ontario, Canada, with the engine being produced in Anna, Ohio.

[Images: Honda]

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39 Comments on “2022 Honda Civic Si: Keeper of the Flame...”


  • avatar
    theflyersfan

    Let’s go with some first impressions. I wonder how long it will take the 2 Honda dealers by me to finally get one for a test drive…

    I do like the design. It’s far more mature than the previous gen, I love the orange on it (the Si has frequently had exclusive colors), and thank God it isn’t filled with excessive fake vents, slashes and gashes, and honeycomb trim.

    The seat color/design. Why does it look faded? If you’re going to go red, go red. It looks like fabric with a lot of sun damage.

    The black wheel fad can vanish at any time…please. One curb incident and your nice rims are now shot to hell.

    Same with the virtual dash using computer generated analog gauges. You know what still works the best and easy to read? Real gauges. Put the screen(s) between the gauges, but this looks like change for the sake of change. Plus I really don’t want to replace large screens when it dies after the warranty expires.

    I bet that is one fun 6-speed to row through. I’m surprised Honda held the line on power. I thought it would compete with the GLI/GTI a bit more and they would have bumped it up 30 or so HP. To me, that is a pretty glaring omission.

    But it is still one to look at, should be fun and reliable, looks a lot better and more restrained than the previous one, and can’t wait for them to hit the lots…and join the 12 new cars that sit at one local Honda dealer’s new car lot.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      I would add that electric park brake can go to. But then again, small turbo engine… Not a big fan.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      The speedometer is analog. Honda seems to be commoditizing the Accord IP across several models. I would have expected to see the full digital display in this, and Honda also not only cut HP a couple, but yanked the heated seats and adaptive dampers from the previous Si as well.

      They seem to be attempting to save some of the goodies for the new Integra.

      • 0 avatar
        theflyersfan

        @sgeffe – they don’t have any interior shots on Honda’s website, but if they use the Touring model’s dash, it will get the full 10.2″ digital display.

        https://automobiles.honda.com/civic-sedan#gallery-interior

        And I so fondly remember how the RSX and RSX Type-S had no heated seats unless you got one north of the border. I guess Honda thought that Canadian cold fronts stop at the border!

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Seriously? No heated seats? If so, that’s some Grade A bullsh!t. They’re in the EX for pete’s sake.

        I hope they bring them back later in the run when I might be in the market. Otherwise wife will refuse to ride in the car 8 months of the year.

    • 0 avatar
      SoCalMikester

      its not going to die after the warranty expires. if its an actual issue in the future itll be replaceable

  • avatar
    Steve Biro

    It’ll probably all come down to price and an actual test drive. But I’m not sure that I wouldn’t rather have a Sport hatchback with manual transmission.

  • avatar
    BobWellington

    Are they not going to have a hatchback version? Also surprised it doesn’t have a bit more power.

  • avatar
    Turbo Is Black Magic

    Shocked they cut power instead of bumping it.

    Seems like the competition is slowly pulling away…

    Seat color is gross.

  • avatar
    Fred

    I think the Integra will have a have a hatch and a few more hp. Will that be what distinguishes it from the Si?

  • avatar
    spookiness

    I really like new Civic, hatch esp., non-SI version.
    One minor annoyance is that anything badged “sport” these days (i.e. Sport, Sport Touring) has no option except for 100% black interior. Even the headliners now. The LX and EX-L trims have light gray or griege headliners, and some colors have the availability of light gray seats. I just can’t fathom black dash, black seats, black carpets, black door cars *and* black headliner.

  • avatar
    stuki

    The Si is likely the best daily driver, for the most (of those who even remotely aware that “driving” can be a pleasurable activity) people, available from anyone. It’s practical, frugal, fun at sub-arrest-me-immediately speeds. And all without almost any compromises; for all those who don’t live where 4 foot snow drifts are common half the year, or insists on dragging their vacation home with them wherever they go.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Not sure what makes this a better daily driver than a Jetta GLI, Elantra N-line, or Forte GT…?

      Having said that, though, if the current Si carries on the strengths of the last model, it’s going to have quick steering, solid suspension/steering tuning, and one of the best manual shifters you can buy. It’ll also be considerably slower than the Jetta GLI and a tad more expensive than the H/K competition, particularly given the fact that Honda dealers are stuck in a “it’s still 1985 and everything else on the market is atrocious” time warp, and will demand over-sticker money for it.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Jetta: Honda reliability.

        Elantra/Forte: Superior suspension tuning and (especially) shifter and clutch.

        Honda and VW, with BMW’s decision to largely abandon the manual, now build the best manual transmissions in the world.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Well, yeah, each car will have its’ strengths and weaknesses, but assuming they all have acceptable reliability (which they should have) any of them would be easy to live with as a daily driver, which is my point.

          (And I’m not so sure about Honda reliability anymore, particularly where turbos are concerned.)

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    That Cyclops center display ruins an otherwise nice-looking car.

  • avatar
    dwford

    How did we go from the Si being compact sports coupe to a midsize family sedan, with the same horsepower for the last 16 years?

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Honda has been making Si sedans for quite some time now. Size-wise, the Civic has also been a quasi-midsizer for quite some time now. Nothing new on either front, really.

      • 0 avatar

        Everything in the sedan world has bloated up a size. Easiest comparison is via Audi.

        The current A4 is the size of the old A6, and the A3 is the size the A4 started as.

        The other day an original LS 400 was beside me for a moment on the highway, couldn’t believe how small it looked.

        • 0 avatar
          Superdessucke

          Yup, my E36 M3, once a common compact executive car, feels tiny now on the road. At 174.5″ in length, it’s 10″ shorter than this Civic. When it was new it was about the same length as a contemporary Civic. And today, this Civic is about the size of a new 3-Series. So that hasn’t changed but cars have indeed gotten bigger!

  • avatar
    Margarets Dad

    Manual transmission with rev-matching … lol. I hope it can be shut off. That kind of stuff is strictly for poseurs.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Assuming they hold the line on pricing, I may well buy one of these in a couple of years. I want another manual car, and I want one that’s inexpensive, not a pain to own, and can carry two small but growing boys easily. That’s pretty much this car, the GTI, or the Elantra N. But the GTI is too expensive and the Elantra’s gearbox can’t measure up to the Honda 6-speed.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    Not sure what to make of the power output. It’s pretty weak compared to its primary competitors and based on early drive reviews of the regular Civic, it appears to be a great car with a noisy interior.

    The GLI wasn’t like that. And it had more power.

    I understand the existence of Type R and Integra means positioning is important, but if GLI is still sitting in that sweet spot of power, space, efficiency and fun, then Si might be a no.

  • avatar
    Imagefont

    I’ve had a chance to drive a few different Honda’s recently and I’ve been very impressed. I bet this thing will be an absolute blast to drive, forget the numbers. If it shifts and turns and is responsive with good feedback then it will be a joy to drive and a true bargain.

  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    I saw a (non-Si) Civic sedan in the wild not long ago and I think it looks good in person, certainly better than the overwrought previous version. I imagine the Si will look even better. So looks-wise this is an improvement over the last Si. We’ll see how it drives but at least it looks good, and it’s a manual. No small thing these days!

  • avatar
    BSttac

    Real shame about how stagnant the power levels have been on the SI over the years. Add to that an electric handbrake and I dont get why you would buy this honestly.

  • avatar
    thegamper

    One of my favorite car theft stories is the guy that steals the car, strips it, leaves it on blocks to be recovered. Buys the corpse at auction, puts all the parts back on and now has a legal salvage title of a nice car for pennies on the dollar.

    Requires a decent amount of effort, but brilliant if you can pull it off.

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