By on September 27, 2021

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio made dirt bikes public enemy number one for traffic enforcement in 2021, citing road safety, cluttered sidewalks, unwanted noise, and air pollution as his primary reasoning. He’s even released videos where the city destroyed confiscated bikes to celebrate the initiative.

“Anyone out there who has an illegal dirt bike — don’t even think about it. Because the NYPD will find it and will crush it,” Mayor de Blasio proclaimed via Twitter earlier this month. “These dirt bikes do not belong in New York City. It’s against the law. Period. Dirt bikes are dangerous.”

The focus on two-wheeled transportation comes after city leadership announced there was a growing number of shootings and robberies tied to certain types of vehicles over the spring. Local outlets also covered an incident where a small child was struck by a dirt bike and placed into critical condition last July. But the actual qualifications for what NYC considers an “illegal dirt bike” are confusing. Numerous exemptions are made for electric scooters and about half of the bikes crushed in the mayor’s video are regular motorcycles. It seems nonsensical and only gets worse when you begin to ponder the consequences of banning some of the most affordable modes of transportation available to poor New Yorkers. 

Cheap bikes are essential for the city’s delivery services and most restaurants are dependent upon a fleet of e-scooters or small, gasoline-powered motorcycles that have only gotten more important as local health restrictions have banned many from indoor dining. While some of the lightest of these vehicles can utilize bike lanes, most operators take whatever route they believe will be the fastest. This means you see them driving up onto sidewalks and following pedal bikes through red lights with alarming regularity.

They’re absolutely a nuisance sometimes. But they’re also the only way for many people to get around, as owning a car in NYC can be prohibitively expensive and troublesome. Renting a parking spot is guaranteed to cost you several hundred bucks per month and attempting to stop that vehicle anywhere else often requires double parking — which is technically legal but clogs up traffic. Buying a small scooter means you can park it just about anywhere and doesn’t require either the operator or vehicle to be licensed. Below is a gaggle parked just a few yards away from my front door. In the late evenings, this group will be five or six plate-less scooters strong, often with young men standing around talking to each other as they return from work.

It’s not quite the unbridled menace de Blasio makes it out to be.

But there are indeed roving scooter and dirt bike gangs with modified exhaust systems serving as a low-rent version of the infamous Japanese bōsōzoku street culture. Some are even alleged to have been linked to shootings and muggings, though the vast majority of riders are regular people just trying to get across town as efficiently as possible.

Meanwhile, on-demand rental companies (e.g. Revel) litter the five boroughs with their high-concept garbage. Alleged to help reduce congestion and ownership costs, the e-scooters can often be found taking up parking spaces that would have been better used by cars and usually piloted by inexperienced, middle-class people who don’t understand that they’re supposed to be constrained by the same laws as other motorized vehicles. But they don’t qualify under NYC’s dirt bike ban, so the officials claim they’re golden to continue operations.

Mayor de Blasio said he expects the city to destroy 3,000 dirt bikes by the end of 2021. However, the language used by leadership is not always representative of existing laws and is generally confusing. Technically, any vehicle that doesn’t have side mirrors, brake lights, or turn signals cannot be registered with the state and can be considered illegal. But smaller e-bikes are supposedly exempt and there are plenty of other two-wheelers that occupy a gray space unless you’re particularly knowledgeable, not that any of it seems to matter.

In the video where de Blasio notifies New Yorkers that their illegal bikes will be crushed, I noticed several curious victims. About a quarter seemed to be sportbikes (e.g. Yamaha R6), sport standards (e.g. Suzuki Bandit), or dual sports (e.g. BMW GS 650) that are totally street legal. The rest was a mix of scooters, dirt bikes, and the odd ATV.

New legislation aimed at increasing penalties for people caught operating the problem bikes was introduced in July. The bill, sponsored by City Councilman Mark Gjonaj, aims to raise fines to $750 (up from $500) for the first offense and $1,500 (up from $1,000) for all additional offenses. Though the core enforcement still comes from the mayor directing the NYPD to simply confiscate vehicles from wherever they’re found.

“This chaos must end,” Gjonaj said over the summer. “These motorcycles are endangering not only pedestrians and other motorists, but are creating havoc and lawlessness in New York City.”

Because there’s nothing lawless about confiscating people’s property because some citizens are mad about loud noises whizzing by their windows? Frankly, it seems to me that someone working for the city just wants a scapegoat for the city’s elevated crime rate and picked the easiest target.

Most of the fervor for these rules seems reactionary, authoritarian, and unpleasantly familiar. Over a dozen Chinese cities, including Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou, Shenzhen, and Xiamen, have banned (or heavily restricted) affordable motorcycles and e-bikes over since 2006. Officials had claimed that traffic violations and crime skyrocketed as poorer citizens flocked to small, two-wheeled vehicles for their transportation needs. While there is evidence to support claims that unlicensed scooter drivers have a tendency to skirt the rules, accusations have also been made that the Chinese government sought to keep lower-income citizens dependent upon public transit.

“It’s important to notice that the selection bias of the most vocal advocates in favor of banning e-bikes are often middle or upper middle class residents who drive [cars], live within close vicinity of a public transit line, or might even have a chauffeur,” CC Huang of Energy Innovation, an advisory firm on urban design, told Forbes in 2016.

These kinds of crackdowns also seem counterintuitive when championed by government leaders, like Bill de Blasio, that cannot stop talking about the environment and climate change. One would assume that motorcycles (which average at twice the fuel economy and half the CO2 emissions of passenger vehicles) would be a desirable alternative to people buying up cars. While gasoline-powered bikes tend to emit more nitrogen oxides and hydrocarbons due to an absent catalytic converter, I find it extremely difficult to believe that a tiny vehicle consuming less than half the fuel of a standard automobile is doing the same amount of damage to the atmosphere. Of course, there are dozen of articles from the last two decades ready to tell you the exact opposite. Here’s one from 2000 saying bikes pollute ten times more than SUVs.

Though I’m not even sure how relevant the pollution factor will even be. Considering that NYC is attempting to remove the vehicles chiefly responsible for food delivery, something tells me there might soon be a monumental backlash against this. The dirt-bike ban is shortsighted and has already proven itself difficult to enforce effectively. Its only advantage appears to be raising fines on people that probably cannot afford to pay them, forcing more individuals to use the ailing subway system, and providing public officials with opportunities to grandstand.

[Image: @NYCMayor/Twitter; Rblfmr/Shutterstock]

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119 Comments on “Opinion: The NYC Dirt Bike Ban is Ridiculous...”


  • avatar
    jalop1991

    “But the actual qualifications for what NYC considers an “illegal dirt bike” are confusing.”

    I’ll know it when I see it.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Confusing? Nope.

      The internet is full of video’s of teenagers, young men on motocross bikes roaming the streets.

      MX bikes would take a considerable amount of work to be converted to “street legal” status.

      It is a major nuisance in many large American cities.

      This is just another Posky rant. Not sure against what? Oh liberals I guess.

      How dare cities stop dirt bike riding hooligans from riding unlicensed offroad only vehicles on the street.

      • 0 avatar
        SPPPP

        But will the young men be any less of a nuisance if they are roaming the streets on motorcycles with DOT certification?

        • 0 avatar
          CoastieLenn

          SPPPP: No, but like the gun debate, it’s easier to control the TOOL than it is the USER.

          • 0 avatar
            SPPPP

            @CoastieLenn: Yep, that seems to be part of the logic. The other part seems to be, just take “their” stuff and fine “them” lots of money so “they” get really poor. That’ll surely encourage “them” to start behaving.

        • 0 avatar
          ravenuer

          spppp, You’re missing the point. Young men riding legal motorcycles are not the problem. It’s the young thugs with unmuffled, unregistered dirt bikes speeding around without any regard whatsoever for traffic laws.

          • 0 avatar
            SPPPP

            Ravenuer, you can ride a legal bike just as dangerously and illegally as you can ride a dirt bike. (And people do just that!) Maybe it’s a bit quieter on a road legal bike. Does that make it safer?

          • 0 avatar
            wolfwagen

            Actually, young men riding Legal motorcycles are a problem as well. The was an incident a few years ago on the West Side Hwy in Manhattan a few years ago. Such a group surrounded a Range Rover driven by an Asian Man with his wife and baby in the vehicle, knocked his rearview mirror off. He stopped only to be surrounded by the gang and they kicked and hit his vehicle breaking the rear window. Fearing for his safety he took off but in the process, he ran over one of the bikers. The Driver was then chased until the bikers caught up with him, stopped him and beat him. As Coastie Lenn said, it is easier to control the tool than the user

          • 0 avatar
            stuki

            Then: Bust people for breaking traffic laws. Whether on dirt bikes, in cars, or in police cruisers.

            While leaving those who don’t, alone.

        • 0 avatar
          sgeffe

          Or the e-scooters!

          Talk about even giving THOSE the bird! ;-)

      • 0 avatar
        Yankee

        @ Lou_BC:

        I’m with you. When I see Posky’s byline I usually don’t even read the story because I know it’s nothing but another diatribe-disguised-as-an-article that has only a passing association with the purpose of this site (“cars,” that is, definitely not “the truth”).

        That said, I wish they’d pass this nationwide to get vehicles not designed for highways and streets off of them, and next start crushing fat old guys’ Harleys with the deafeningly loud modified exhausts. I’d pay to watch that! Meanwhile, here in Pennsylvania, we repealed the helmet law, which has done wonders for our organ donation program!

      • 0 avatar
        Superdessucke

        “It’s not quite the unbridled menace de Blasio makes it out to be.”

        Ah. Ok. Well meaning suburbanites are going to be the death of us I swear. Actually, I don’t know where the author lives but I live in a big city and I can tell you it is becoming a major problem. Transportation my foot!! They ride around in packs, don’t obey traffic laws (why would they?), ride up on sidewalks, and do it at all hours of the night. It’s pretty ridiculous actually. I don’t agree with most of what de Blahbozo does but here, he’s right on! I hope other large cities follow suit.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Several of those bikes in the picture are street bikes.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        “How dare cities stop dirt bike riding hooligans from riding unlicensed offroad only vehicles on the street.”

        Unless said cities simultaneously provide a realistic, de facto alternative, they have no standing to do so.

        “Regulate” means “to make regular. “Not “to ban.” Bans on driving on the left side, is only valid as long as the “equally good” option of driving on the right, is not banned. As soon as both are banned, people’s God give right to travel about as they see fit, trumps some totalitarian hack’s desire to keep his niggas shackled down on his cotton plantation with no realistic means of getting out.

    • 0 avatar
      MitchConner

      As usual, people like Lou and the idiot leadership of New York get it all wrong.

      Yes, there are morons who ride dirt bikes and ATVs in urban areas with complete disregard for everyone and everything. Those people should be arrested and thrown in jail while their motorcycles and ATVs are confiscated and sold to help pay for their incarceration instead of stupidly and wastefully run over for some dumb PR stunt and thrown in the dump.

      But NOOOoooooOoooo. All dirt bikes must be banned and anybody who uses them — even those who do responsibly — are now considered criminals. Meanwhile the scofflaws go ahead and continue to do what they want anyway because the knucklehead DA basically lets anybody the police catch go for the sake of social justice. Fines? Yeah, right. As if some dope who’s still making payments on a pair of kicks from 2019 is going to cough up any dough to pay a fine for a dirt bike that just got pinched.

      Go ahead and post your reply Lou – because know it alls like yourself absolutely, positively HAVE to get the last word in on everything because in their righteous minds only they can be correct — even as they’re repeatedly stepping on rakes.

      I used to visit New York every October. Room in the upper floor of the Essex House overlooking Central Park. The weather was perfect. The tourists were gone. The crowds were down. You could get great seats at shows, sporting events, and great bars and restaurants. Great little liquor store around the corner. Would go buy a bottle of wine, sit in the room, look out the windows and watch the sunlight go down and the lights of a great metropolis come up. It was awesome. Now? I wouldn’t go there on a bet until the wreckage of that buffoon De Blasio is cleaned up. Same goes for Portland, San Francisco, and Minneapolis.

      Cities need strong leaders with real backbones capable of standing up to and getting tough with those who need to be corrected — just like a real parent does when raising a kid the right way. Unfortunately, clowns like De Blasio pander to the idiots who whine, cry, and scream the loudest to the detriment of everyone else.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @Superdessucke – Correct.

        A couple of dudes with 2 motocross bikes in the back of a pickup on the way to a local racetrack isn’t the problem here. That is perfectly legal.

        You don’t buy “off-road” dirt bikes and ATV’s as daily transportation unless you live rurally. In a large urban centre they are purchased for the ease of outrunning police and “stunting”.

        You are also correct that they form packs or ride in gangs.

        Confiscated bikes is no different than confiscated any item used in crime.

      • 0 avatar
        wolfwagen

        Cities need strong leaders with real backbones capable of standing up to and getting tough with those who need to be corrected…

        That is exactly what Rudy Giuliani did along with his police commissioners. They got tough on criminals, miscreants, drugs, the mob and even the dirty cops. I moved to the NYC area shortly after Rudy took over. My wife who was a Brooklyn-Queens girl would tell me the horror stories of what NYC was like before Rudy took over. Bloomberg kept it going in the right direction although not in the same intensity.

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          Wolf wagon – we like to say Rudy fixed it up, Bloomberg kept it up, and DeBlasio f%$# d it up…I will add that i agree with some of Matt’s points though. Bill is not always even handed with his polices that’s for sure…he had no problem taking a scheduled raise and three vacation days from City employees (managers) to pay for those who needed paid maternal leave…no discussion, just did it.

      • 0 avatar
        Superdessucke

        @MitchConner – I’ve lived in Chicago, or right on the outskirts, for over 27 years now. Until last year, a dirt bike or four-wheeler was a very, very rare sighting. I could probably have counted all of my sightings on one hand. So they’re not using them for “transportation” or to get around to put bread on the table or whatever. That’s a load of bleep!

        And with the liberal prosecutors we have in many urban areas, good f’n luck with them doing any jail time. First of all, why would the police even risk an encounter or pursuit over something like that? If it escalates or someone gets hurt, they’re just going to get thrown under the bus. I know a cop in a south suburb where this has become a huge problem and their policy is to not even chase an ATV or dirt bike if they flee. It’s not worth it. If the idiot crashes and kills himself, or someone else, the police will get sued and the media will crucify them. And even if they manage to arrest the person, the individual is more likely than not going to be out in 3 hours, and riding off down the sidewalk, on their ATV, giving them the finger.

        I agree NYC could perhaps could be a PR stunt, but it’s amazing to see a big city leader take a stand for quality of life for law abiding citizens for once. I’m all for it, and hope it is enforced with teeth.

        • 0 avatar
          MitchConner

          No, cops can’t chase bunches of idiots around all day — but a combination of traffic monitoring cameras and helicopters can be used to track and arrest enough people to get even the dumbest to figure out their behavior isn’t worth it. Difficult. Not impossible.

          The problem is when you have an electorate dumb enough to vote for dimwits like De Blasio and Lightfoot — everybody winds up swimming in the bright blue waters of the portable toilet tanks our major cities are today.

    • 0 avatar

      Comment of the day, if we still did that sort of thing.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @Jo Borrás – single out the comment you are praising. Someone posts a comment to the tread and it goes before your post, it can change the optics of your praise. I know you were referring to @Superdessucke post.

  • avatar
    wjtinfwb

    Stupid. The bikes being crushed are a scapegoat so the remarkably inept NYC leadership doesn’t have to confront the real problem, reckless operators using the bikes (and cars, and bicycles) to raise hell, inflict harm and commit crimes. But no… we can’t lock those miscreants up, that would be politically unpopular. So lets blame the machine, destroy it, and force the crooks to find another method to… raise hell, inflict harm and commit crimes. Typically that means stealing someone else’s car, bike or bicycle to continue on their merry crime spree. C’mon NYC, deal with the actual issue, some of your residents belong in JAIL. Put them there and keep them there and leave the toys alone.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    Hopefully he’ll soon be *former* mayor Warren Wilhelm, Jr – oops, I mean Bill de Blasio.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      “elections”

      • 0 avatar

        Don’t worry, it is strictly among Democrats. “Elections” will be next midterm.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          Does “build back better” rings like “perestroika” to you?

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Sort of, but if events follow the Soviet collapse model the “young leader to lead reforms who has already been selected” Golitsyn referred to in 1980 (turned out to be Gorbachev) hasn’t come on the scene yet. Biden fits the Andropov/Chernenko archetype all too well but Vice Pretender Harris is too incompetent, disliked, distrusted and lacking any political savvy or charisma enough to fill the Gorbachev archetype. Must be the 2024 selected candidate who will bring it all down, which lines up with the final implementation of ISO 20022 and the rumors of FedCoin.

            Tell me if this doesn’t sound at all familiar with events 2015 to now, substitute “Biden” for Andropov/Chernenko (save the “best informed” part) and “Trump” for Brezhnev:

            “The Interregnum: Andropov and Chernenko

            Toward the end of his life, Brezhnev lost control of the country. Regionalism became stronger as the centre faltered. When Brezhnev died on November 10, 1982, he was succeeded as party leader by Yury Andropov, although his chosen successor was Konstantin Chernenko. Andropov had been head of the KGB from 1967 to May 1982. He then slipped into the Central Committee secretariat after Mikhail Suslov, the dry, severe guardian of ideological rectitude, died. Without this move he could not have become party leader. By June 1983 Andropov had also become president of the U.S.S.R. and chairman of the defense council—all the posts that Brezhnev had filled.

            Andropov was the best-informed man in the U.S.S.R. and set about reforming the country. He was a cautious reformer, believing that there was nothing fundamentally wrong with the socialist system. He believed that more discipline, energy, and initiative would turn things around. Corruption, absenteeism, and alcoholism were rife and were his special concerns. The retail trade system and transportation were targeted and felt his reforming zeal. His leadership style was in sharp contrast to that of the opulent, pompous Brezhnev. He cut back privilege and met workers on the shop floor. Andropov’s anti-alcohol campaign was well conceived but it led to a sharp fall in government revenue. His industrial and agricultural policy was quite sensible but ineffective, since the economy was already in terminal decline.

            Under Andropov a group of cautious reformers rose to prominence. These included Mikhail Gorbachev, Yegor Ligachev, and Nikolay Ryzhkov. Andropov wanted Gorbachev to succeed him and added a paragraph to this effect to his report to a Central Committee plenum that did not convene until after his death on February 9, 1984. Instead the 72-year-old, terminally ill Konstantin Chernenko was eased into the top party post and later became president of the U.S.S.R. and chairman of the defense council. The aging Politburo had plumped for a nonreformer, a throwback to Brezhnevism. However, Gorbachev became “second” secretary, with responsibility for chairing Politburo meetings when Chernenko was away or unfit—which turned out to be quite often.”

            https://www.britannica.com/place/Soviet-Union/The-Interregnum-Andropov-and-Chernenko

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        I wrote here on this already. The difference is – after Stalin, Soviets were ruled by committee. Although Khrushchev was still acting as a strongman, the period was knows as a “spring thaw”. With Brezhnev, that was the deal – “grey wolves”. They removed Khrushchev and they already settled their deal among themselves, who will be doing what “after Nikita”.
        Again, the difference between Brezhnev and Biden is that we knew that Brezhnev was a talking head with Politburo being in charge. We knew each person there. With Biden we don’t know who is in charge here.

        Andropov was not a bad guy. He was installed into KGB position because he threatened Brezhnev’s position, he was a talented manager. So Brezhnev gave him an important role and protected himself. What is correctly written in “britannica” is that Andropov could never be the head of state in USSR if he was, lets say, a KGB officer, like Putin, who climbed the ladder into KGB chairman. He needed to be in the “party top ranks”. And because Andropov was in the party top ranks, he was able to work the vote.

        One of the top [if not the top] candidates after Brezhnev was Shcherbytsky – first Secretary of Ukrainian communist party and permanent member of Politburo. Brezhnev was promoting him. But Andropov famously said, “we had enough of Ukrainians”, refereeing to Khrushchev, and Brezhnev. I even think, they were waiting for Brezhnev to die so that Shcherbytsky will lose his main source of support.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          “Again, the difference between Brezhnev and Biden is that we knew that Brezhnev was a talking head with Politburo being in charge. We knew each person there. With Biden we don’t know who is in charge here.”

          We do know Senator Biden wasn’t capable of handling the presidency last year, at least not full time. Now it seems his health has declined further and he’s probably been reduced to near rubber stamp (or perhaps being manipulated into being as such and not realizing it). The real power is being held in what I and many who are paying attention are calling the Junta/DC junta. Likely his wife, national security advisor (Jake Sullivan), some members of the national security council and probably a few outside have input. Most of Biden’s major cabinet members seem as incompetent as he has become so I doubt they are pulling any real strings (Harris, Blinken, Austin, CJCS Gen Milley). Chief of Staff Ron Klain has been around a long time and “knows where the bodies are buried” (Chief of staff to VP Gore and VP Biden). Secy Yellen is probably a major force without being forceful, she’s probably the most in charge since she speaks for the Fed. AG Garland always struck me as a tool but perhaps he’s on the ball (hope not). DNI Avril Haines -being former CIA director- is probably a bigger wheel than she looks. Energy Secy Granholm I don’t recall being a slouch and Secy of Energy has a statutory seat on the NSC she she may be part of the ruling junta. That is the US Politburo who is the power behind the throne.

          Interesting tidbit about Secy Andropov, had the Hinkley assassination of President Reagan in 1981 succeeded VP Bush -former CIA director- would have been president at the same time Andropov ascended to General Secretary. This mean the world’s two superpowers would have been headed by intelligence assets. Remembering Golitsyn, I personally believe what’s coming for the US would have occurred in the 1980s in concert with the previously planned demolition of the Soviet Union. Instead, that opportunity could not take place and the dissolutions would occur decades apart.

          I’ll also add Andropov was KGB Chairman from 1967 to 1982, he wasn’t simply a politician pushed into an administrative role for a few years. As a result he had a lot of blood on his hands, perhaps in sheer numbers not up there with Hitler, Stalin, Mao, Himmler, Kaganovich, Kaltenbrunner, Beria or Dzerzhinsky but quite a bit nonetheless.

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yuri_Andropov

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            You kinda just proved my point :-) You said these

            “Likely his wife…and probably a few outside….Secy Yellen is probably a major force….perhaps he’s on the ball (hope not)…[Haines] is probably …she she may be part of the ruling junta..”

            see, what I am talking about? We don’t know. In USSR we knew that Politburo runs the state, and every person in it who has input.

            Back to Andropov… He has no more blood on his hands than any CIA director. KGB was reformed including under his supervision into organization that worked strictly for the state rather than to serve interests of the ruling individuals, like NKVD (today – FBI does that). Yes, KGB still was used to suppress those who wanted to speak out. But they used way softer methods. Blackmail, placing people into mental institutions, etc. Exactly what US military did with Lt. Col Scheller.

            “he wasn’t simply a politician” – friend, they in USSR weren’t politicians. They were managers. They started at some factory. Then they would get promoted to the higher positions in the party ranks if they had good friends or they really showed results. Boris Yeltsin is the best example. A party secretary’s friends told him about Yeltsin. He was installed. But in the end, it is the results that he delivered in Sverdlovsk took him up into near top in party ranks.
            The only politicians in USSR were people who studied diplomatic relations and worked in the organizations interfacing foreign governments and groups. Others were propagandists and managers. What politicians if all they say was – we are guided by our party. This is management.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I agree, oddly enough something the Soviet Union did better than Amerika. Though even among the Presidium I imagine there were figures in the shadows exerting influence the Russian people had no knowledge of.

            “KGB was reformed including under his supervision into organization that worked strictly for the state rather than to serve interests of the ruling individuals, like NKVD”

            Great, so instead of a ruthless criminal organization serving the rich and powerful it served “the state” instead. But who is “the state”? The rich and powerful; same as it ever was. Overseeing the KGB for that length of time puts Andropov in the same category as Heydrich, his work in that regard is indefensible.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            “But who is “the state”? The rich and powerful;”

            Who is the state was written into the Constitution. – all people, guided by a single party, the communist party. It was clear what is the state.

            Rich and powerful… I don’t think so. Stalin died penny-less. All people of Politburo were sons of peasants or plain factory workers. Once they died, their families were assigned a stipend and an apartment and they had to leave the properties they used during governing.

            Brezhnev’s daughter though to be super rich. KGB was searching all her properties, I mean any property where she ever lived. They scanned and broke the brick walls, and not found anything. After all, she was living off the gifts men gave her for being daughter of her father.

            The only rich people were corrupt managers in factories and some secretaries of cities and regions who were in cahoots with those people in the factories. And Andropov was out to clean them up.
            Compare Andropov to Heydrich is a bit out of whack. Heydrich after all was a Nazi criminal as defined by Nuremberg trials. And Andropov was nothing like that. I know that it is hard for you to comprehend this especially after reading some materials produced by haters, but Andropov was an honest man, who brought a true professionalism to KGB and reformed it, and got rid of a lot of corruption in the top ranks.

            In fact, he was a reformer, who wanted to change USSR. He replaced 18 Ministers, 37 First secretaries of ComParty in the regions. And he brought Gorbachev. In 1983 he was Time’s “Man of the Year” together with Reagan.

  • avatar
    Nick_515

    Crush ’em.

    “A monumental backlash against this.” How cute.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Downtown Cincinnati has outdoor parking spaces for scooters and bicycles which I believe is free. I never thought of Cincinnati as being progressive but if New York City doesn’t even have parking for scooters and bicycles then they are not very progressive–too busy sticking it to the taxpayers. I can see not allowing dirt bikes but a small motorcycle or scooter especially if they are electric would be more environmentally friendly than a taxi or a car especially a V8 Suburban. Glad I don’t live and in New York City which is a better place to leave than to go to. Most New Yorkers will be glad to see de Blasio’s back side.

    • 0 avatar
      Matt Posky

      While there’s always a lot to cope with, I used to really enjoy living in NYC and have been here for over a decade. But the last couple of years really threw things in the wrong direction. It’s becoming less livable. Crime is going up, traffic laws keep getting more restrictive, prices remain wildly high for everything, the subway is constantly broken, a large percentage of curbside parking has been given up so restaurants can build curbside eating areas, and the list just goes on. Everyone, and I mean everyone, living here gripes about it.

      A lot of residents are great, no-nonsense people and there’s still a wealth of things to enjoy. But the leadership is truly abysmal and bent on making changes I’m not fond of and don’t even seem to make much sense. So I’m bailing so I can have a four-car garage and a big yard. That said, I would still rather die in NYC than live in Los Angeles.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        I actually have a guy who works for MTA. Now I know why Subway is broken. Actually, the way these people work there in the repair facilities is a carbon copy of USSR. Unions, no responsibility, little work is done, good benefits. If this was a private company, it would be broke

        • 0 avatar
          CoastieLenn

          @slavuta- I worked for Coca Cola in New York for a summer back in ~2001. The union protected a decent number of slow, underperforming wastes of space that the company tried multiple times to fire. One guy had been with Coke for almost 20 years driving a forklift loading trucks, making over $40 per hour… and routinely found a place to hide and fall asleep. Union protected him.

          Screw unions. Not what they WERE, but what they’ve become.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        I think space and being largely left alone (from both the mayor and dirt bike gangs) are worth having Red Lobster be the “fancy restaurant”. YMMV.

      • 0 avatar
        ToolGuy

        @Matt,

        “So I’m bailing so I can have a four-car garage and a big yard.”

        Are you actually leaving? If so, good for you. (This is what I meant when I asked “Are you ok?” last time – genuinely concerned for your mental well-being.)

        “I find it extremely difficult to believe that a tiny vehicle consuming less than half the fuel of a standard automobile is doing the same amount of damage to the atmosphere. Of course, there are dozen of articles from the last two decades ready to tell you the exact opposite. Here’s one from 2000 saying bikes pollute ten times more than SUVs.”

        Which is correct? They can’t both be true. (This is called cognitive dissonance – it’s not good for your brain.)

        What is the purpose of a catalytic converter? Do they work? (Is it “extremely difficult” to believe they work?) It would be important to convince yourself around things like this before writing authoritatively in public.

      • 0 avatar
        wolfwagen

        Any why are they crushing perfectly good vehicles rather than auctioning them off? A classic example of the government not giving an F about wasting money.

        My thoughts exactly when I saw this happening. They could even restrict it so that the offenders cant get their bike back or even restrict it so they have to be sold out of the city/state confines

      • 0 avatar
        wolfwagen

        Matt,
        Don’t even bother staying in NY. It is truly a cesspool. My wife and kids moved out to Suffolk county in Long Island back in 2014. My wife said this is the last move, I’m done. Fast forward to December 2020 the wife said that’s it I’m done living in NY – tired of high taxes and crime. We are now looking to move down south ASAP once my twins graduate HS this year. She’s pushing for the kids to go to school down south

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          …She’s pushing for the kids to go to school down south…

          Seriously? Long Island has many top-rated school districts. The taxes are high but those areas with good districts will provide an excellent education to the kids while helping to keep home values high – a major benefit when you sell. It helps when teachers can be paid a decent salary. Down south the teachers seem to be paid dirt.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        “…It’s becoming less livable. Crime is going up, traffic laws keep getting more restrictive, prices remain wildly high for everything, the subway is constantly broken…”

        Same words could have been spoken in 1960, 1970, 1980, 1990, 2000, or 2010. Welcome to New York. Unless you’re a zillionaire, it’s a tough place to live, and it’s probably no picnic for them either. Always has been, always will be.

        • 0 avatar
          Matt Posky

          NYC crime rates dropped consistently between 1993 and 2018 and subway system was substantially more reliable just five years ago.

          • 0 avatar
            sgeffe

            Doomberg meant well, but certainly overstepped his bounds when he regulated the size of sodas! Of course, his taking away the right to defend oneself was much worse!

            And now DeBlasio is ratcheting-up the tyranny!

      • 0 avatar
        SoCalMikester

        criminals riding stolen vehicles should probably be investigated. also, most powersport equipment has a built in catalytic converter since 2008, so yeah- before 2008 bikes were “dirtier” than other gas powered things

    • 0 avatar
      CoastieLenn

      Jeff, if you make owning a scooter or e-bike easier in NYC, residents will take public transport and taxis less frequently… which by extension would come at the expense of at least one rather large union in NYC.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    You had me at the headline – agreed.

    “havoc and lawlessness in New York City”… Aren’t there about a thousand things that rank higher than illegal dirtbikes, and have done so for the last 400 years?

    This sounds like the plot for the movie Footloose.

    • 0 avatar
      Matt Posky

      I would rank this as number 743 in the biggest problems NYC needs to address right now.

    • 0 avatar
      swester

      It may seem totally ridiculous to someone who hasn’t been in NYC over the past few years, but I have to agree – the dirtbike caravans that cruise down Manhattan’s avenues is pretty insane and wildly dangerous, like something out of Mad Max. Until you’ve seen it in person (and it happens with alarming frequency), you wouldn’t believe it.

      I’m not sure I agree with this silly PR stunt of a ‘solution’ but something needs to be done.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        My son on Philadelphia says this problem exists there, too. Apparently the cops now perform a warm pursuit of the scofflaws, because a hot pursuit recently resulted in injury to a child.

        Still, it seems like an effort to get them legal is better than a harsh crackdown…

        Sort of like legalization of small quantities of marijuana.

        • 0 avatar
          VX1NG

          Everyone who calls this something out of Mad Max is absolutely correct. I just moved to a town on the outskirts of Philly and this issue of huge groups (100s and one weekend over 1000 of people) driving and doing stunts through city and suburban streets is a common occurrence. If you are confused by what this looks like I literally have multiple videos of me sitting in my car at red lights as these groups weave around my car; driving in the median and over sidewalks and running red lights, cutting off oncoming traffic all while doing stunts.

          So, that’s the situation. Are all the participants breaking laws and causing havoc, no. Are all the vehicles participating dirt bikes and atvs, also no. Are all the vehicles participating unregistered and unlicensed, no.

          However, like all social issues in the urban environment things are not cut and dry and laws are designed intentionally to be cut and dry. Banning dirt bikes is not going to fix the issue nor will increasing the fines (what they did here in Philly). We as society need to exam closer the deeper issues of why do these participants feel the desire to engage in these very risky behaviors. Examining these issues would require open two way communication between the participants and the cities where these events are occurring.

          In my eyes this issue is very similar to the “menace” that skateboarders were considered in the late 80s to early 00’s. Maybe if we added some dedicated space for these participants to more safely engage in these activities (like skateparks) then we will see a decrease in these Mad Max style groups.

  • avatar
    Da Coyote

    It’s NYC. What isn’t?

  • avatar
    jpolicke

    No sympathy. These poor urban yoots ride any way they please, have no insurance, and get quite nasty if you take issue with them. Get a license, get insured, get a plate – you know, the way the rest of us do.

  • avatar
    mcs

    I guess this is some sort of mass food delivery:

    youtube.com/watch?v=bij3iANU7TU

    youtu.be/quYYzBIrnT4?t=35

    youtu.be/rA_TV_ekigI

    youtu.be/WCguxHOWkKo?t=176

    youtu.be/iA_d1kvZm9A?t=147

    • 0 avatar
      SPPPP

      Clearly, these young men should take their hobby to one of the many free dirtbike and ATV courses available for the urban public’s use. Such as the one at … er … or maybe … uh, never mind.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @SPPPP – why would someone bother to buy a dirt bike if the only place to ride is on streets and alleys? It isn’t much more expensive for a street legal version.

        • 0 avatar
          SPPPP

          @Lou_BC – Well, it’s a good question. The “enforcement push” seems like a version of “broken windows” policing, as if taking away the technically non-compliant equipment will also take away the impulse to ride dangerously. Maybe they ride dirt bikes specifically *because* they are illegal. Has anyone considered that making dirt bikes “more illegal” might make them more attractive?

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @SPPPP – dirtbikes in an urban setting should be easy to spot. No lights, signals, plates etc. If you just confiscate any unregistered, unlicenced, or purely offroad bikes, it makes controlling the problem easier. Any reasonable owner isn’t going to be riding their MX bike on a public street.

  • avatar

    I knew that that de Blasio is an idiot. This article just confirms his status.

  • avatar
    Imagefont

    I’ve visited Manhattan many, many times for work and the place, as awesome as it is for its history and buildings and restaurants is otherwise a screwed up mess that doesn’t really work. Transportation is a joke. You either walk, ride the horrendous disaster of a subway system, or take a cab. All of these alternatives suck. It needs to be far more economical to get around so I’m not at all surprised that unlicensed bikes are roving the streets. They brought this on themselves. Next they’ll charge for walking.

  • avatar

    First time I saw trailbikes in NYC was in the 80s. This is a summertime thing with recurring news discovery and PD crackdowns.

    I’ve been in NYC traffic, stop and go block to block when you hear a motocross race come upon you. I had a 125cc MX bike at one time so I just smile, but lots of folks freak at the noise when a pack passes you, it scares the civilians. They rely on the fact that they can scatter if the law shows up…and do. The whole point is being loud and proud in a pack, a lawless road show, a bit of Mad Max.

    These guys aren’t e bikers or deliverymen. They know they can get caught and take the risk. Losing the bike is worse than a Court Summons.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      These bikes are unlicensed and unregistered, it might be possible to trace the owner once you had the bike but since MX bikes aren’t cheap, confiscation and destruction amounts to a very stiff fine. Hopefully it is a deterrent.

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    I was in Buenos aires a few years ago, it was amazing how folks used motorbikes there. About 70-percent of the bikes were Honda CBR250s, they lane split and weave in and out of traffic, but damn if it doesn’t work – I never saw stunting, riding on sidewalks or anything really crazy, just people making their way through an dense city. There were motorbike parkades with up to 500 machines in a relatively small space. Also they can park on sidewalks and this never seemed to be a problem. But there’s a difference between people just getting around and people deciding to be ass-hats, the machine isn’t the problem.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    Oh thank god. Now that this liberal mouth breather has fox all of NYCs problems, he can focus on the real issues. Dirt bikes.

    Not sure who this national embarrassment is going to get to enforce this though. The NYPD has been defunded and crime is through the roof (a common theme in lib run cities). May be the same social workers that should be responding to acute mental health incidents (you know the one where there’s a guy with a weapon and out of his kind) can take care of this too.

  • avatar
    ar_ken

    Is it the same NYPD that de Blasio defunded?? Because if it is I don’t think they will have the resources or time to “crush them all”…

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    “These motorcycles are endangering not only pedestrians and other motorists, but are creating havoc and lawlessness in New York City.”

    The havoc and lawlessness is due to a certain class of people who specialize in wreaking havoc and breaking the law.

    You couldn’t pay me enough to live in New York City, or any other “Blue” city like SF, Portland or Seattle for that matter.

    Any why are they crushing perfectly good vehicles rather than auctioning them off? A classic example of government not giving an F about wasting money.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @CoastieLenn–Thanks I did not think of that. Another good reason to not work in NYC. Cannot blame Matt for wanting to move out of NYC and live in the burbs with a 4 car garage. Tough to be a car guy and live in a place that is anti car and anti motorcycle. Since many of us don’t live in NYC, New York, or San Francisco we are grateful to live where we do. We have a better understanding of why people are leaving those places in droves. Basically you pay high taxes and shut up because you don’t matter.

  • avatar
    bunkie

    What’s ridiculous is this opinion piece.

    First off, we are talking about operating unlicensed, ininsured motor vehicles in the most densely-populated city in the country. When you’ve seen these gangs in action, as I have, it becomes clear that riding on the sidewalk, wheelieing, riding backwards on one-way streets and in circles on avenues is something to be strongly discouraged.

    Worse, it ruins things for those of us who are legal motorcyclists. It’s bloody hard to keep a bike in Manhattan, as I have, and these bozos are just poisoning the waters.

    And, finally, the notion that double-parking is a necessity is just plain wrong. I kept a car in Manhattan for over 20 years and the number of times I needed to double-park was, exactly, zero. Parking in the city is a skill that NYC drivers can (and do) master.

    Try again.

    • 0 avatar
      Daniel J

      “When you’ve seen these gangs in action, as I have, it becomes clear that riding on the sidewalk, wheelieing, riding backwards on one-way streets and in circles on avenues is something to be strongly discouraged.”

      This could easily occur with legally registered bikes, no? While I haven’t seen this sort of behavior in action personally, I have seen groups of completely legal bikes in a suburban or rural settings doing all sorts of illegal things.

      So what do you say in regards to bikes that aren’t street legal but are allowed on the road in NYC?

    • 0 avatar
      Matt Posky

      I live in NYC, own a full-sized sedan, frequently park it on the street, and am an avid motorcyclist. One of my bikes was even crushed by a drunk teenager trying to parallel park a Toyota Sienna a few years ago. I don’t care that two dozen guys roll into down and ride like idiots in midtown (often on totally legal bikes) a few weekends every summer when it’s totally common to see e-bikes and scooters doing the exact same thing literally every night in every single borough. I also don’t want leadership to fixate on scapegoating vehicles when there are bigger fish to fry and they can’t even manage to find and crush the ones they’re supposedly angry about.

      Also how have you never seen people double parking if you’ve lived in the city for two decades? Avoiding double parked cars is Driving 101 in NYC.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    NYC would say to crush all bikes. I understand the problems with gangs and riding on side walks but draconian measures and laws are not the solution.

  • avatar
    BSttac

    NY and California need to be annexed. Backwards thinking. Waiting for them to ban private jets…oh wait, the mayor uses that, can’t touch that….hypocrite

  • avatar
    kcflyer

    Classic example of democrat policy. Crush the bikes. Don’t sell them to fund parks or law enforcement. Don’t arrest, prosecute and punish the offenders (that isn’t woke) So the thugs will steal another bike or pay one of their buddies to steal another one. In short, don’t address criminals and keep handing out welfare and public housing to encourage more criminal activity. The rest of us will just pay more of what we earn to pay for the failed policies and pay to replace our stolen private property and pay higher insurance rates because we filed a claim to replace what the thugs stole. The bikes are not the problem, just like guns are not the problem. Why is this so hard to understand?

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    I truly wonder how this POS has avoided assassination.

    • 0 avatar
      C5 is Alive

      A question one could rightfully (and ruefully) ask about many politicians.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Once you get above a certain level, that becomes a lot more difficult. But this guy has no love from NYPD (or really anyone) and I’d put money on the fact not one officer would be willing to sacrifice his life for him (in fact in such an event I wouldn’t be surprised if the 9-11 Sgt. Schultz argument of “17 intel agencies knew nothing” doesn’t come up from NYPD). If he doesn’t have his own private security forcible removal is not out of the realm of possibility.

        What would even come of it? The dementia gasbag in DC will make more threats against the American people while not really caring but he and the new NY governor can use it as an opportunity to unveil further dictatorial powers while blaming something false. The more that I think about it, why *isn’t* the DC junta doing this? Wilhelm is a hated failure and would be far more useful to them as a martyr. Hell it would probably get the true approval rating of the administration out of the 20s. Blah blah terrorists, blah blah I will lead ‘murica etc. Worked for the less gifted Bush, and his level of intelligence was probably similar to the dementia patient’s current level of understanding.

    • 0 avatar
      Hydromatic

      Because no one’s going to risk a life sentence for “making a statement” by capping the NYC mayor. You’d have better odds betting on DJT winning a second term

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        The patsy doesn’t usually know they are they patsy until after the hit. Random wacko isn’t going to be the one doing the deed, just taking the fall and conveniently leaving a perfect passport or confession for the authorities to “find”.

      • 0 avatar
        C5 is Alive

        More’s the pity, Hydro. Politicians would likely be a bit more inclined to act on behalf of the greater good, for the better many, if they faced real risk of harsher repercussions for not doing so than the remote possibility of losing the next “election.”

        And no student of history should discount the chances of Trump 2024. I’m no fan of the Orange Clown, but I have a feeling the Dem “election” machine will need to work harder than ever before to prevent that from happening.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Just saw the de Blasio video. NYC’s will be getting rid of a dirt bag as well.

  • avatar
    Ol Shel

    Outrage over dastardly liberals destroying Americans’freedom -vs- the desire to severely punish black and brown people committing misdemeanors.

    TTACers heads are exploding over this clickbait.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      Especially punished – Cory Booker, Obamas, Omar… severely….

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @Ol Shel – Yes. Clickbait. I’d say pseudo-outrage over anything liberal but for the most part, that rage is real. It’s become a defining Posky regurgitated theme: “how dare they (Dems) take away our (perceived) freedoms….”

      • 0 avatar
        Matt Posky

        It’s almost every day that I have to make some kind of comment to Lou explaining how I am an independent, beholden to neither political party. Please debate the issue or article rather than obsessing over imagined affiliations.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @Matt – your article is an opinion piece backed by little more than, well, opinion.

          “It seems nonsensical and only gets worse when you begin to ponder the consequences of banning some of the most affordable modes of transportation available to poor New Yorkers.”

          Unlicensable dirt bikes somehow are the preferred choice of the poor?
          New Honda motocrossers run 8,000 to 10,000 dollars USD.

          “Numerous exemptions are made for electric scooters”
          Please list.

          In my province there are loopholes mostly because motor-vehicle regulations tend to be outdated.

          Do pedals change what’s legal?

          How does motor- vehicle regulations apply to scooters?

          “One would assume that motorcycles (which average at twice the fuel economy and half the CO2 emissions of passenger vehicles) would be a desirable alternative to people buying up cars.”

          Um, LOL. Reaching there. You really are. Motocross bikes are “closed course” “competition only” vehicles that do not meet any emissions standards. How much pollution does a 2 stroke (oil mixed with gas) produce?

          Dude… urban motocross/urban dirt biking is a problem in many major USA cities.

          Why’d you single out New York?

          It’s a red state/red city problem too.

          LOL, and you claim that I’m commenting on your bias as opposed to the content… you are biased.

          I just debated the issue. Feel Better?

          If it isn’t bias than what is it?

          Poor journalism?

          • 0 avatar
            Daniel J

            @Lou

            Um, it is an opinion article. I don’t think its anything different than that. I have zero issue with a journalist making an opinion piece.

            What I do have an issue with is journalists writing columns that are indeed opinions, but are listed as facts. Many left leaning rags have gotten into hot water when their articles have been challenged because the writer is making statements as facts when they are opinions and aren’t even in Op-Ed areas of their papers. Even the publications in some cases have admitted that the columns were opinions.

            Getting to the red state/red city problem. Most large cities are Democrat. Now as a red state issue, what I see is dirt bikes all the time on rural roads….actually obeying traffic laws with their street illegal bikes.

            What I think is being addressed here are two different things.

            1. People doing stupid things with their vehicles, regardless of the street legal status of said vehicle.

            2. Loopholes and contradictions between what the state defines as street legal and what NYC is allowing.

            If a dirtbike has no mirrors, has no brake or turn lights, and an E-Bike or scooter also has no mirrors, brake lights, or turn lights, are the laws being enforced equally?

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Chinese dirt bikes are ridicoulously cheap. They suck, but they are almost cheap enough to be considered disposable.

            I don’t know for sure…its been years since I rode dirt bikes, but 2 strokes were on the way out back then due to them being increasingly hard to sell in California. (sadly IMHO, a CR500 felt like it wanted to pull my arms off under WOT)

            I’d imagine he singled out New York due to the tweet bragging about them destroying the bikes.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        ““how dare they (Dems) take away our (perceived) freedoms….””

        Precisely, because ‘muricans have no freedom post 9-11. They have what “freedom” they are allowed to have while they have it but it could later change as needed.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          Lt. Col. Scheller

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            It’s ironic than he is the lone Military Officer that so far has been held accountable for their actions during the fall/surrender of Kabul. He knew what he was getting into and their are things you just arent allowed to do, but in an event were people were falling off planes in flight and 13 servicemembers were killed, I find it difficult to fathom that he is the lone Officer that has been relieved for their actions. How many times for example did Lloyd Austin lie to the President with respect to the readiness of the Afghan Army when he was the CENTCOM commander. He’s far from alone. That so far one Officer has been relieved and he was relieved for running his mouth, not getting people killed in an absolute crapshow of a Military Operation is a stunning critique on the current state of our Military.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            Art,

            I think there is more to the Kabul blast. I’ve heard that it was a lot of friendly fire ensued and there are soldiers who were treated for gun-fire wounds.

            Here is one tweet
            “Our report from last night on the awful ISIS attack outside Kabul airport as families still search Kabul’s morgues for their loved ones..
            Many we spoke to, including eyewitnesses, said significant numbers of those killed were shot dead by US forces in the panic after the blast ”

            Military basically confirms that there was a gunfire after the blast. But it seems that truth us being hidden right now.

            https://www.military.com/daily-news/2021/08/27/gunfire-followed-suicide-attack-kabul-airport-investigation-continuing.html

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            That’s not really anything out of the ordinary in that situation (The gunfire). It was common post blast there would also be gunmen to try to get the first people on the ground first (In Iraq a secondary device that was anti-personell oriented was the standard practice instead of gunmen), but it was a similar tactic. Bomb goes off, people panic, bad guys shoot. It is entirely plausible that some would be hit by friendly fire in such an environment given the panic and sheer numbers of people. I don’t see a conspiracy here…just one of the most difficult situations a Soldier can be put into with likely the expected results.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            Conspiracy or not, I don’t hear anyone talks about the situation. All we know is there was an explosion and nothing else. But it seem that something else happened as well.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            They have said it was a complex attack. By definition that would mean that something else happened. The typical TTP they employed in my experience was to set a device off and then have gunmen along the paths the crowd was likely to run and open fire on them. On occasion they would employ a secondary device timed to main the first responders but more.often than not it was just dudes shooting. Makes it real difficult to shoot the baddies with a crowd of civilians between you and them. They grasp this concept unfortunately.

            Given that this is the low point of an operation that nobody seemed to have the slightest grasp of anyway I am doubtful that we will ever know 100 percent what happened. All we know to this point for sure is that we killed a bunch of kids and an aid worker in response …another event for which there are fewer people in jail for than for criticizing the whole operation. Shameful.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            Hopefully the Peace Nobel prize will not be awarded to Biden for “ending the longest war of 21st century”.

  • avatar
    SoCalMikester

    you guys DO realize that some major cities are having issues with roaming “gangs” that usually ride dirtbikes/quads that are either purchased cheaply or stolen from the suburbs?

    this is what that story is about. everything else is just panties getting twisted over nothing. seems to be a “sport” amongst males of all political stripes, including offduty cops.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    NYC issues don’t effect most of us but I understand what Matt is saying. There are other ways to deal with dirt bikes instead of a public display of crushing them. In my opinion de Blasio is nothing more than a politician looking for attention and if I were a New Yorker I would be counting the days till he leaves. As others have stated the dirt bikes used by gangs and other criminals are either purchased cheaply or stolen and if it is not dirt bikes it will be bicycles, scooters, or skateboards. Any major city has this problem. As others have stated I would rather read something about cars, trucks, and suvs.

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