Carlisle Jumps From Cadillac Prez to GM North America Boss

Steph Willems
by Steph Willems
carlisle jumps from cadillac prez to gm north america boss

Cadillac President Steve Carlisle just got a promotion. Following the announced departure of General Motors North America President Barry Engle, GM tapped the 58-year-old Canadian for the spot.

Arriving at Cadillac in 2018 after the ouster of former brand boss Johan de Nysschen, Carlisle has overseen the introduction of new product and the development of the first of Cadillac’s future range of electric vehicles. It’s a direction GM’s pursuing heavily across all brands, making Carlisle an obvious pick for Engle’s job.

In a statement, GM said Engle, 56, was “leaving GM to pursue leadership opportunities that leverage his broad executive expertise in a variety of industries.” Carlisle steps into his new shoes on September 1st. A source told the Detroit Free Press that Engle, sensing that time was running out, jumped ship in order to find a company to run. The search is on.

For Carlisle, who joined the automaker as a co-op student at GM Canada’s Oshawa Truck Assembly in 1982, Engle’s departure represents an opportunity to make a mark as sales, service, and marketing leader across all GM divisions. He’ll report to GM President Mark Reuss. Before leaving to head the Cadillac brand, Carlisle served as president of GM Canada.

“Steve will help us scale the considerable transformation progress we have been making, while at the same time preserving the sufficient autonomy necessary to maintain four distinct vehicle brands,” said CEO Mary Barra in a statement.

“This role will build on Steve’s progressive leadership within GM, particularly over the past two years at Cadillac. This change will also improve the collaboration and decision-making that fuel innovation.”

While Carlisle retains his oversight of Cadillac, the scope of his job was widened, meaning someone else needs to keep a close eye on the automaker’s premium brand on a day-to-day basis. That responsibility falls to Rory Harvey, 52, who GM appointed vice president, Cadillac Sales, Service and Marketing. Harvey joined the brand in 2018 after serving as boss of the former British GM property, Vauxhall.

[Images: General Motors]

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  • Arthur Dailey Ford was on a roll with these large cars. The preferred colours being either green or brown. The brown was particularly 'brougham'. Chrysler vehicles also seemed particularly popular in green during that era. Ford's 'aircraft' inspired instrument 'pod' for the driver rather than the 'flat' instrument panel was deemed 'futuristic' at the time. Note that this vehicle does not have the clock. The hands and numbers are missing. Having the radio controls on the left side of the driver could however be infuriating. Although I admire pop-up/hideaway headlights, Ford's vacuum powered system was indeed an issue. If I left my '78 T-Bird parked for more than about 12 hours, there was a good chance that when I returned the headlight covers had retracted. The first few times this happened it gave me a 'start' as I feared that I may have left the lights on and drained the battery.
  • Jeff S Still a nice car and I remember these very well especially in this shade of green. The headlights were vacuum controlled. I always liked the 67 thru 72 LTDs after that I found them bloated. Had a friend in college with a 2 door 71 LTD which I drove a couple of times it was a nice car.
  • John H Last week after 83 days, dealership said mine needs new engine now. They found metal in oil. Potential 8 to 9 month wait.
  • Dukeisduke An aunt and uncle of mine traded their '70 T-Bird (Beakbird) for a brand-new dark metallic green '75 LTD two-door, fully loaded. My uncle hated seat belts, so the first time I saw the car (it was so new that the '75 models had just landed at the dealerships) he proudly showed me how he'd pulled the front seat belts all the way out of their retractors, and cut the webbing with a razor blade(!).Just a year later, they traded it in for a new '76 Cadillac Coupe de Ville (they had owned a couple of Imperials in the '60s), and I imagine the Cadillac dealer took a chunk out to the trade-in, to get the front seat belts replaced.
  • CaddyDaddy Lease fodder that in 6 years will be on the 3rd owner in a poverty bound aspirational individual's backyard in a sub par neighborhood sinking into the dirt. The lending bank will not even want to repossess and take possession of this boat anchor of a toxic waste dump. This proves that EVs are not even close to being ready for prime time (let's not even talk about electrical infrastructure). EVs only exist in wildly expensive virtue signaling status-mobiles. FAIL! I know this is a Hybrid, but it's a Merc., so it will quickly die after the warranty. Show me a practical EV for the masses and I'll listen. At this time, Hybrids are about the way to go for most needing basic transportation.
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