By on June 11, 2020

Few models can boast of a debut year as dysfunctional as that of the C8 Corvette’s. Chevrolet’s newly mid-engined sports car saw production delayed by a lengthy strike, then kiboshed by a strange virus, leading to no shortage of frustration for those seeking to get their hands on a 2020 model.

Production is again underway, but the automaker already has 2021 on its mind. It seems the minds at the Renaissance Center felt it necessary to maintain as much of the status quo as possible.

As reported by Car and Driver, orders for the 2021 C8 open in July, with both the coupe and convertible variant carrying over their 2020 entry prices of $59,599 and $67,495, respectively.

While the drop-top ‘Vette was supposed to follow its coupe sibling in short order, the shuttering of the American auto industry upon arrival of the coronavirus pandemic threw a wrench into things, leaving the streets and garages of the U.S. devoid of such a variant. In April, it was reported that no such convertibles existed.

We now know that 2020 C8 convertible production will get underway this summer, before Bowling Green Assembly switches over to the ’21 model later in the year. What, if any, content changes await buyers of next year’s model is still a mystery.

[Image: Mark “Bark M” Baruth/TTAC]

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19 Comments on “Chevrolet Corvette Holds the Line on Entry-level Pricing...”


  • avatar
    thornmark

    this the present iteration really makes me pine for the 1963 Sting Ray

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      Yep, some can be had for about the same price, however the split-window coupe will probably run you double

      • 0 avatar
        thornmark

        and in 20 years, quadruple at least

        • 0 avatar
          snorlax

          In 20 years you’ll be able to get a ’63 split window dirt cheap. The Boomers who pined for one as children will all be in nursing homes or dead, and the massive decrease in demand will be matched by an equally massive increase in supply when children sell the cars they inherited from Dad.

          By and large, the only classic cars that appreciate are the ones that the rising generation (i.e. Millennials and older Zoomers) remember fondly from their childhood and teenage years. In general a classic car will start appreciating at around 15 years old, peaks in value at 25 or so, then slowly depreciates until a dead cat bounce around 45, when the pool of potential buyers reaches retirement age, and rapidly depreciates thereafter.

          If you want to buy a Corvette as an investment (you’ll almost certainly be better off investing in stocks – there are some very juicy bargains after today’s selloff), I suggest the C6 Z06, which is the hottest one ever made with NA engine and manual transmission. Right now you can get a decent one for under $35k; expect that to double within the next 5-10 years.

          Another thing to keep in mind is that there are two Swords of Damocles hanging over the classic car market in the form of self-driving and electric cars. It’s likely that non-self-driving and/or non-electric cars will ultimately be banned from some or all roads, and even if that doesn’t happen, it will eventually be difficult or impossible to drive a gas-powered car because all the gas stations will have either gone defunct or converted their pumps to electric chargers.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            If there are still horse carriage enthusiasts in 2020 (and there are) then there will still be classic car enthusiasts in 2120.

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            “In general a classic car will start appreciating at around 15 years old, peaks in value at 25 or so, then slowly depreciates until a dead cat bounce around 45, when the pool of potential buyers reaches retirement age, and rapidly depreciates thereafter.”

            This explains why I can get a Duesenburg or V16 Cadillac for dirt cheap right?

          • 0 avatar
            snorlax

            Without a doubt, but that doesn’t change the fact that almost every horse-drawn carriage, however classic or desirable, was scrapped during the 1920-1940 period. So it shall be for gas-powered cars over the 2020-2040 period.

          • 0 avatar
            snorlax

            > “This explains why I can get a Duesenburg or V16 Cadillac for dirt cheap right?”

            A very few classic cars at the top of the market, almost all low-volume exotics from “blue chip” marques (e.g. Porsche, Ferrari, Bugatti, Duesenberg) hold their value better than other cars of the same vintage. These are very much the exceptions that prove the rule, and even they will eventually decline in value (IIRC Duesenbergs and V16 Caddies are currently trading at well below peak values).

            A Miura is such a car; a split window Corvette (or any Corvette) is not. They made too many of them.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            I do expect prices will trend down on some 60s cars but I believe “dirt cheap” is overstating it. It’s not like a clean 30s Flathead struggles to get $10K today.

            I think the C2 especially will have more staying power compared to the C1 and early C3.

            In general I think you are being more pessimistic about the future of the automotive hobby than will be the reality. But we’ll see.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            I’m glad that you’ve figured out the classic car market, because very few people have. I’ve seen many mundane cars built before any boomer was conceived trading for seemingly ridiculous prices. As far as your gloom and doom forecast on the future of ICE powered cars, I doubt anyone here reading this will live long enough to see that day

  • avatar
    JMII

    Given the demand and backlog in production it is a bit surprising to see they haven’t tried to extract more money from buyers. I guess this is part of the Corvette’s claim to fame: maximum performance for the money, thus charging more would be anti-Corvette.

    I normally hate convertibles, but I think the C8 looks best with its top tucked away.

    • 0 avatar
      thornmark

      it’s a bath tub design

      belt line way too high for looking at or looking out

      no doubt safety reasons dictated that

      • 0 avatar
        JMII

        Its typical of this kind of car.

        As a C7 owner I can tell you that you are basically sitting on the ground, like a race car. When seated the torque tube is at kindey level, so yeah you are down inside the thing! I’d bet the main goal was keep the weight as low as possible to optimize handling as the C7 has a lower CG then a Lotus Elise. So I look UP at Camry bumpers. Lifted trucks might as well be airplanes they are so high.

        Visibility is said to be improved on the C8 due to the lower hood and cabin being pushed forward. Compared to my 350Z the ‘Vette actually has better rear and side visibility… but not out the front. You want really bad? Check out a Lambo – that was like looking out a mail slot due the windshield rake.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          ^^This is why I have a problem with sports cars, your description started to give me sweaty palms due to claustrophobia

          One of my take aways of owning a Corvette was being surrounded by hub caps and bumpers and not being able to see anything else

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    You guys are not Truth About anything. You are just parroting the press releases. Check Card and driver, same “holds the line” language. Sukkahs!

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Eh… Still don’t want one.

  • avatar
    relton

    I would suggest that the launch of the Cadillac V16 in 1930 was probably just as inauspicious, if not more so. A car that costs more than most homes in America, launched when 20% unemployment loomed, the dustbowl was decimating the economy of half the country, breadlines and soup kitchens dominated the landscape of most cities. That would be a tough sell.

    Sure the C8 Corvette is launched in tough times, but let’s keep this in perspective.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I saw one of these for the first time “in the wild” the other day. I’m a fan. Flame away!

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    The C8 is growing on me. At first I hated it but not now.

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