By on May 10, 2020

Elon Musk + Tesla Model S Circa 2011

California announced late last week that it will allow the cautious reopening of manufacturing operations across the state, but Alameda County resisted, claiming it will keep non-essential businesses shuttered until the end of the month.

Guess which county Tesla’s Fremont assembly plant is located in.

Now guess Tesla CEO Elon Musk’s reaction to the country’s announcement. If you speculated that Tesla might sue Alameda Country, with Musk launching an online tirade in which he promises to move Tesla HQ and all future products out of the state, you’d be right.

“Tesla is filing a lawsuit against Alameda County immediately,” Musk tweeted Saturday, following Alameda County’s announcement of a June 1st reopening. “The unelected & ignorant ‘Interim Health Officer’ of Alameda is acting contrary to the Governor, the President, our Constitutional freedoms & just plain common sense!”

This, after Musk hailed California Governor Gavin Newson’s announcement. After wrangling with county officials, Tesla shut down its operations after other mainstream automakers had already gone dark, with Musk later garnering headlines for his rants about the coronavirus and what he perceived as attacks on civil liberties taken by various levels of government.

Tesla did file a lawsuit against Alameda County in a San Francisco federal court Saturday, with the plaintiff calling the county’s move a “power grab” that was in violation of federal and state constitutions and in defiance of its governor.

Musk then promised to get the hell out of California.

Before the coronavirus pandemic reached these shores in force, Musk began a search for a second vehicle manufacturing site, with Texas being an early possibility. Musk later announced he as looking for a location in the central United States. Cities like Joplin, Missouri moved quickly to woo the CEO and his promised jobs.

While Tesla’s Fremont site houses the Model S, X, 3, and Y operations, its capacity is maxed out. Future models like the Cybertruck, Semi Truck, and perhaps the delayed Roadster will need to find a new home. Nevada currently handles Tesla’s battery operations.

Musk’s tweets earned backlash from the equally online political sphere, with California Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzales (D) stating “Fuck Elon Musk” in a tweet of her own. Other officials tempered their language.

As reported by The Guardian, Alameda County’s health department issued a statement claiming, “We look forward to coming to an agreement on an appropriate safety plan very soon.”

“It is our collective responsibility to move through the phases of reopening and loosening the restrictions of the shelter-in-place order in the safest way possible, guided by data and science,” it added.

Not everyone is on the anti-Musk bandwagon, with Fremont mayor Lily Mei expressing concern for the area’s economy. “We know many essential businesses have proven they can successfully operate using strict safety and social distancing practices,” she said in a statement.

Speaking to The New York Times, Alameda County’s supervisor for Fremont, Scott Haggerty, said Musk is being impatient.

“We were working on a lot of policies and procedures to help operate that plant and quite frankly, I think Tesla did a pretty good job, and that’s why I had it to the point where on May 18, Tesla would have opened,” Haggerty said. “I know Elon knew that. But he wanted it this week.”

The supervisor said he was in the process of showing county officials that Tesla had sufficient health protocol ready to go when he was threatened with a lawsuit on Thursday.

“It was only a threat, and as an elected official I get threatened all the time,” Haggerty said, adding, “It does at that point slow down conversations between my contact at the plant and myself.”

Tesla soon detailed its position and outlined its health preparations (and recent interactions with the county) in a lengthy blog post.

[Image: Tesla]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

128 Comments on “Tesla Sues County; Musk Promises to Pick up Toys, Go Home...”


  • avatar
    EBFlex

    I don’t know whats more funny.

    The fact that a fake car company who’s products don’t make money is going to waste more money on suing the county or the fact that the county wants to extend the pointless stay at home order.

    Gotta love Commiefornia.

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      There is nothing communistic about California. Your comment is 5th-grade playground material.
      Musk is an innovator, with the gall and creativity to come up with PayPal, the first major electric car company, a private space flight enterprise and enough other weird stuff that you’d think he came here from the future. (Personally, I’ll often root for the underdog just to support a bit of entropy.)
      He’s also arrogant and unrealistic, with no concern
      for health and safety, either before the current pandemic or at the present time.
      Take a few weeks to cool your heels, get past the growth part of the infection and death curve, and then we can get on with economic recovery. IN THAT ORDER. Putting the cart before the horse makes a hell of a mess.
      Musk is as arrogant as the half-witted keyboard warriors, and talks out of his @$$ just as much as they do.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        California is more organized crime than commie. They try to partner and share your company’s wealth by extreme taxation, and endless fees.

        Musk claims he’s ready to go to jail for Tesla, but clearly that will never happen. Tesla will be fined up to a million dollars a day for opening early.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Yes, because packing up a car factory that produces 300Kish vehicles (I only speculate as they don’t release overall numbers at their different facilities, 300K is likely a touch conservative) and moving it somewhere else is sooooooooooo easy.

    I mean, after the 2011 earthquake in Japan Honda and Toyota moved whole factories in just a couple of weeks.

    Oh wait, no they didn’t – and it was far more than an infrastructure issue. It is feckin’ hard.

    Not everyone is going to want to move. Not everyone can move.

    I also don’t see his customer base sharing his views.

    Honestly between the selling everything, the stock is too high, I’m moving, and his kid’s name — I think his cheese is slipping off his cracker.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      Who said anything about moving a “car factory that produces 300Kish vehicles”?

    • 0 avatar
      Superdessucke

      I totally agree with you that it’s very difficult to move an auto factory. But that being said, there are many states who would kill to have them and who would incentivize the living bleep out of them to do it. So it’s not as simple as just saying “hey, they’ll never move, bleep Elon Musk.” I mean, I’m sure the politician who tweeted that scored some major points with that red meat for her base but the relationship between business and government always has to be balanced carefully.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        “But that being said, there are many states who would kill to have them and who would incentivize the living bleep out of them to do it.”

        This is true. There are several states willing to give Elon Disneyworld levels of autonomy in exchange for building factories and HQ. That certainly should be considered in the argument.

        However I don’t think Elon actually plans to move out of CA. He just likes to stir stuff over Twitter.

        • 0 avatar
          Superdessucke

          A state like Tennessee will send a team of U-Hauls over there and move the factory for him, and pay Him per mile. But yeah, probably just talking here. I’m just saying it’s a little nuanced is all. And just because he has a big yap doesn’t mean elected officials have to also.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      When GM ran Fremont Assembly, it produced about 250,000 cars and trucks annually in two shifts on a five day week. I doubt Tesla now exceeds that number.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Musk likes to run his mouth.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    “Frankly, this is the final straw. Tesla will now move its HQ and future programs to Texas/Nevada immediately.”

    Hey, Elon, don’t let the screen door hit ya…

    I’m sure the stockholders will be thrilled

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      California has been saying “don’t let the door hit ya…” to so many manufacturing companies, you need a college degree to get a decent paying service industry job in the state, or know plumbing (they can’t ship a clogged toilet to Bangalore). That’s why the fastest expanding industry in the state is government.

  • avatar
    ttacgreg

    Poor Elon, he just can’t wait a few more weeks for his worker bees to start generating his wealth again.
    The COVID thing has really brought out the “snowflake” in lots of right-wingers who love slinging that insult around.

    Off topic, but here goes. Just a COVID side note here. The USA is per capita one of the very highest infection and death rates in the world, so even as restrictions are being lifted, and horrific numbers being swept under the carpet, the odds of contracting the virus are as high as they have ever been and look to be getting more likely by the day. It is even making the rounds in the White House. So take care of yourselves, all you rugged I got mine, F.U. individualists out there.
    83,000 deaths as of today, 85k tomorrow, 87k the after. How about this for a QTOD, how many COVID deaths by Election day? The USA true is #1! MAGA indeed.

    • 0 avatar
      Nick_515

      At least there is some level at which this nutjob is a revolutionary. There are actual cars. All we got from the other one is maga sadness and his lowlife cronies.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      “so even as restrictions are being lifted, and horrific numbers being swept under the carpet, the odds of contracting the virus are as high as they have ever been and look to be getting more likely by the day.”

      Gotta love the baseless and hysterical scare tactics. A lot of people get the flu what is your point?

      The Corona cold has a .1-.3 death rate. This lockdown stuff is completely pointless.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        @EBFlex; you still don’t understand. And it seems that you are impervious to facts or data. Perhaps you should speak to some healthcare workers, and ask them about their experiences? And no, the vast majority of healthcare workers do not compare this to influenza.

        The lockdown is designed to slow the spread of the virus. There were insufficient PPE’s for healthcare workers, not enough ventilators, and not enough hospital rooms available if the spread of the virus was not slowed down or contained. The system was not ready for something this infectious.

        That is the reason for the lockdown. And in the nations that have implemented and enforced these procedures, in time, they have proven effective at achieving the above goals.

        The next fear is that removing social distancing/lockdowns, the infection rate will again jump to numbers that will overwhelm the healtcare.

        • 0 avatar
          EBFlex

          Impervious to what facts?

          The fact that infection rates are 10-85 times higher than reported?

          The fact the mortality rate is far lower than reported?

          The fact it has been here far longer then originally thought.

          Aside from New York, our healthcare system was never overwhelmed and never in the dire position the media wanted people to believe.

          But I’m impervious to facts. Good one.

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            Researchers from EUA’s Norwich Medical School examined the impact of different social distancing measures used in 30 European countries using data from the European Centre for Disease Control, analysing how effective they’ve been in reducing the number of COVID-19 infections and fatalities. They concluded that the most effective measures are closing schools, banning mass gatherings and closing some non-essential businesses, particularly in the hospitality industry. However, some measures, such as compulsory face masks, have not been effective. In particular, indiscriminate stay-at-home measures are ineffective.

            According to Dr Julii Brainard of UEA’s Norwich Medical School: “We found that banning mass gatherings, closing some non-essential businesses, and closing educational facilities are most strongly associated with reduced incidence after a certain lag period. But widespread closure of all non-essential businesses and stay-at-home policies do not appear to have had a significant effect on the number of Covid-19 cases across Europe.”

        • 0 avatar
          thelaine

          “The next fear is that…”

          Fear is not science. Fear is not data. Public policy based on fear is what has caused the economic catastrophe. We did it to ourselves. 30 million unemployed. Millions thrown into poverty. Lives and businesses destroyed. Personal finances wrecked. Savings wiped out. Rent unpaid. Public finances imploding. All because of fear.

          Fear was used to justify a general economic lockdown, which is a policy NEVER used in the history of the country in response to ANY crisis because there is no scientific basis for it. We did it in response to apocalyptic “models” predicting millions of deaths, which were complete garbage but were endlessly hyped by the popular media and swallowed whole by a terrified public. It is long past time we came to our senses and targeted our response to the actual threat. Our panicked response has destroyed enough.

        • 0 avatar
          thelaine

          The clustering of complications and death from Covid-19 among the elderly and chronically ill, but not children (there have been only very rare deaths in children), suggests that we could achieve the crucial goals of social distancing — saving lives and not overwhelming our medical system — by preferentially protecting the medically frail and those over age 60, and in particular those over 70 and 80, from exposure.

          https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/20/opinion/coronavirus-pandemic-social-distancing.html?searchResultPosition=2

          David L. Katz is a specialist in preventive medicine and public health, president of True Health Initiative and the founding director of Yale University’s Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center.

        • 0 avatar
          thelaine

          The USS Theodore Roosevelt had a crew of 4,800. Given the acute sample, testing was holistic. This yields an actual infection rate of roughly 23 percent, and among those infected, the fatality rate is 0.09 percent. Among the Roosevelt’s entire crew of assumedly healthy and able-bodied sailors, on a floating Petri dish, during the thick of viral outbreak that shut down all schools and placed healthy citizens across America under house-arrest, the fatality rate was .002 percent.

          • 0 avatar
            TrailerTrash

            you are wasting your time.

            this is not the crowd to give actual data to…they require snake oil.

        • 0 avatar
          thelaine

          Dr. Steven Shapiro, chief medical and scientific officer of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, made a statement from which I have drawn the following excerpts:

          We indeed saw a steady stream of patients but never “surged.” At peak in mid-April, COVID-19 patients occupied 2% of our 5,500 hospital beds and 48 of our 750 ventilators. Subsequently, admissions have been decreasing with very few patients now coming from the community, almost all now being from nursing homes. Of note, in the 36 UPMC-owned senior facilities we have had zero positive cases.

          Our outcomes are similar to the state of Pennsylvania, where the median age of death from COVID-19 is 84 years old. The few younger patients who died all had significant preexisting conditions. Very few children were infected and none died.

        • 0 avatar

          Good nutshell of the commonsense version of this…

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            @TrailerTrash.
            Facts and or bona fides.

            One of my children is a practicing epidemiologist specializing in infectious disease control. So I get the actual facts.

            Two, I am an ex-government occupational health and safety specialist. In contact with my ex-co-workers.

            Three: one of my nieces is an emergency room physician.

            As a result I am privy to actual data. Not alternate website drivel or assumptions.

            @LouBC is an actual healthcare worker. He also speaks the truth.

            The truth is that social distancing is/was required. That people can spread the virus despite being asymptomatic.

            And that to ensure social distancing closures were/are required. Otherwise the initial infection rate would have been so much higher that facilities would be overwhelmed.

        • 0 avatar
          thelaine

          Read this letter from the speaker of the House of Pennsylvania, Mike Turzai, to get a sense of how we were lied to about the impetus for such drastic action.

          Sadly, 3,106 of our citizens have died due to Covid-19. The average age of those that have passed away is 79 years old.

          To date, of these 3,106 deaths, 2,108 of these persons lived in nursing homes, personal care homes and assisted living residences. That means 67.9% those who have died lived in these types of settings.

          Of the 3,106 persons who have died, 11.9% had 4 comorbidities, 22.7% had 3 comorbidities, 27.2% had 2 comorbidities, 22.6% had 1 comorbidity and 11% had zero comorbidities. While these percentages only add up to 95.4%, these were the statistics that were provided to us verbally.

          Of the 3,106 persons who died, 61% had hypertension, 54% had heart disease, 37% had diabetes and 30% had chronic pulmonary disease.

          According to the Hospital and Health System Association of Pennsylvania (HAP), citing Pennsylvania Department of Health statistics, there are 37,000 beds in Pennsylvania hospitals.

          As of today, 2,572 of these beds were occupied by Covid-l9 patients, which amounts to 6.95%.

          There are only 539 patients in the hospitals on ventilators, which amounts to 1.46% of all hospital beds.

          Hence, we chopped our proverbial head off to deal with a very defined and isolated problem.
          There’s nothing unique about Pennsylvania. This is the story of nearly every state, where 95%-100% of deaths were in nursing homes or among those with several underlying conditions, and the median age of death was either at or above life expectancy.

          We knew from day one from clear studies of the Diamond Princess ship in early February that this was a problem almost exclusively for the elderly and those with three or four very specific ailments.

          All of our resources needed to be used to protect that vulnerable population in a targeted and strategic approach, as we do with nearly every public policy problem. Even after this became apparent, two to three weeks into the crisis, the politicians doubled down on failure and tyranny and are doing so to this day.

        • 0 avatar
          TrailerTrash

          Arthur Dailey
          we have classed before.
          now we do so again.

          it is you who do not know what you are talking about.
          there is NO DATA showing the lockdown prevented the emergency rooms from building up out of control, there is NO DATA showing the lockdown prevented the fast spread of the virus, and in fact, the IS DATA showing the opposite.
          see reports out today on the american flat tops that were highly concentrated with sailors, the virus, and still had fantastic virus results.
          even today’s news, not the sources you go to but those that do not use snake oils or “untested pseudoscience” when enforcing a free people into lockdowns, killing the greatest economy in the history of man.

          and i must inform you, with a long history of wold viruses and mass dyings, NEVER has a locking down of the healthy over the possibly endangered or weak and medically challenged EVER happened.

          So, who are you crapping?

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            Appearing on Sunday’s Meet the Press, Michael Osterholm, Director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota, courageously spoke truth to the public health establishment’s power when he warned that the coronavirus can’t be contained not even with massive testing. He confirmed the assessments of other experts that, within the year, 60% to 70% of Americans will have contracted the coronavirus.

            “We have to understand that we’re riding this tiger, we’re not directing it,” he said. “This virus is going to do what it’s going to do. What we can do is only nibble at the edges, and I think it’s not a good message to send to the public that we can control this virus in a meaningful way.”

            “Contact tracing and testing are important, but they won’t stop [the spread of the virus],” he said.

            “We can’t give people a false sense of security that we’re going to do more than we can, but we also have to figure out how to live with this virus, and that’s what we’re not doing,” he said.

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            Is such prolonged exposure more likely to occur in public places or by sheltering in confined spaces? Gov. Andrew Cuomo, the spiritual leader of the gubernatorial lockdown caucus, recently expressed consternation at a recent study showing that, of the 1,000 new COVID-19 patients admitted to New York hospitals over the last week, 66% had been staying at home and 18 % came from nursing homes.

            “Overwhelmingly, the people were at home … which is shocking to us,” said Cuomo.

          • 0 avatar
            TrailerTrash

            Arthur Dailey
            ok, see, this i8s the problem with you cowards and picnickers.
            I asked for data and you giver me name dropping.
            i don’t care who you know or that you were a former practicing government worker.
            you have no data or you would share.
            as i said…never in the history oif the world have we ever locked down the healthy.
            never…got it.
            we have locked down a whole lotta things, but NEVER the healthy.
            Never have we allowed government specialist to determine whose careers and livelyhoods were essential.
            NEVER.
            i can name 5 more personal relationships in this virus detail to every one of yours.
            that is not required.
            what IS required are facts. facts that prove not only what you did was warranted, but that what you did didn’t even make things worse long term and actually destroy lives forever.

        • 0 avatar
          thelaine

          BBC now says the models were garbage, massively overstated risk and caused panic. Lockdown deaths soon on pace to exceed virus deaths in UK. Watch the whole thing. https://twitter.com/aginnt/status/1259636253399580678 …

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        “The Corona cold”: There are about 30 types of coronavirus and they do cause about 20% of colds. This one has killed 85k people in only a few months. It’s outpacing the flu death rate. It’s more than the typical cold.

        • 0 avatar
          EBFlex

          Nope. Death rate is very similar to the flu.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            “Nope. Death rate is very similar to the flu.”

            That is a false statement. When have we lost 85k people in just a few months to flu? The flu is not as deadly. One reason is that we have flu vaccines.

        • 0 avatar

          @mcs and Arthur: The CDC says the death rate to COVID 19 in the US, last I looked which was last week, was .1 to .3% depending on area – similar to regular seasonal flu. That doesn’t mean I’m comparing it to the flu, I’m comparing death rates caused by two different diseases from the same family of viruses. Sweden, who did not shut down their economy like so much of the world, has a .3% death rate last I knew (3.5 weeks ago). All the recent serology studies I’m aware of – Stanford, USC, Florida, MA, etc. – came to the same conclusion – it’s been here longer than reported, more have already had the disease than thought and it’s death rate is, as a result, similar to seasonal flu. These are all facts as of 2 weeks back. Please do the research and find out for yourself. MSM does not generally report on this issue with a great deal of accuracy.

          mcs: you are quite correct about COVID 19. It is not a simple cold. From what I’ve read up to this point, and first hand experience, it usually lasts anywhere from 7 to 14 days.

          The 1968 Hong Kong Flu killed 100,000 Americans, yet in 1968 we did not shut down businesses, schools, sports or concerts. My big question is why? Reputable sources – the CDC among them – all point to a similar death rate. Why the extreme measures now in 2020? I don’t get it. If folks have reliable information on this that refutes what I’ve shared I would greatly appreciate knowing sources. My sources that I can remember are, CDC, WHO, New York Post, Off Guardian, and several physicians’ articles – some specialists, some less so but still in the medical community.

          A friend of mine that used to work for the DCI, worked 911 and other “disasters”, has a relative in the medical community who told him the hospital they work for has required them to log deaths, such as a car crash victim who comes in and subsequently dies, as a COVID death if they test positive in tests prior to death. Does that sound like a responsible thing to do or does it sound like some facilities are “padding” numbers to justify to mitigations taken to limit spread of COVID 19? Why do WHO and CDC documents on pandemic response list most of the mitigations being taken right now as having low to no effectiveness in limiting the spread of COVID? I’ve read through the sections in both organizations documents. I’d like to know the truth because it seems official trusted sources are not being heeded on some issues and are being guided on others without much logic applied to which is which.

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            THX. Outstanding summary. COD.

          • 0 avatar
            TrailerTrash

            mcs

            don’t be dragging around the false This Is NOt A Flu death rates.
            First of all, the flu data is over a 365 day period.
            we will revisit this death rate in the future completed 12 months.
            next..THE FLU DEATH RATE WAS NEVER INCENTIVIZED BY EXTRA MONEY PER DEATH
            that is stunning all by itself.
            and there is real data showing hospitals and government data using this as a means to increase funding and monies.

        • 0 avatar
          TrailerTrash

          you do not have the data on this…please stop spreading this nonesense.

      • 0 avatar
        thelaine

        Many countries (and members of their press media) have marvelled at Sweden’s relaxed strategy in the face of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic: schools and most workplaces have remained open, and police officers were not checking one’s errands in the street. Severe critics have described it as Sweden sacrificing its (elderly) citizens to quickly reach herd immunity.1 The death toll has surpassed our three closest neighbours, Denmark, Norway, and Finland, but the mortality remains lower than in the UK, Spain, and Belgium.2
        It has become clear that a hard lockdown does not protect old and frail people living in care homes—a population the lockdown was designed to protect.3 Neither does it decrease mortality from COVID-19, which is evident when comparing the UK’s experience with that of other European countries.

        PCR testing and some straightforward assumptions indicate that, as of April 29, 2020, more than half a million people in Stockholm county, Sweden, which is about 20–25% of the population, have been infected (Hansson D, Swedish Public Health Agency, personal communication). 98–99% of these people are probably unaware or uncertain of having had the infection; they either had symptoms that were severe, but not severe enough for them to go to a hospital and get tested, or no symptoms at all. Serology testing is now supporting these assumptions.4

        https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(20)31035-7/fulltext

      • 0 avatar
        thelaine

        Fact 1: The overwhelming majority of people do not have any significant risk of dying from COVID-19.

        The recent Stanford University antibody study now estimates that the fatality rate if infected is likely 0.1 to 0.2 percent, a risk far lower than previous World Health Organization estimates that were 20 to 30 times higher and that motivated isolation policies.

        In New York City, an epicenter of the pandemic with more than one-third of all U.S. deaths, the rate of death for people 18 to 45 years old is 0.01 percent, or 10 per 100,000 in the population. On the other hand, people aged 75 and over have a death rate 80 times that. For people under 18 years old, the rate of death is zero per 100,000.

        Of all fatal cases in New York state, two-thirds were in patients over 70 years of age; more than 95 percent were over 50 years of age; and about 90 percent of all fatal cases had an underlying illness. Of 6,570 confirmed COVID-19 deaths fully investigated for underlying conditions to date, 6,520, or 99.2 percent, had an underlying illness. If you do not already have an underlying chronic condition, your chances of dying are small, regardless of age. And young adults and children in normal health have almost no risk of any serious illness from COVID-19.

        Fact 2: Protecting older, at-risk people eliminates hospital overcrowding.

        We can learn about hospital utilization from data from New York City, the hotbed of COVID-19 with more than 34,600 hospitalizations to date. For those under 18 years of age, hospitalization from the virus is 0.01 percent, or 11 per 100,000 people; for those 18 to 44 years old, hospitalization is 0.1 percent. Even for people ages 65 to 74, only 1.7 percent were hospitalized. Of 4,103 confirmed COVID-19 patients with symptoms bad enough to seek medical care, Dr. Leora Horwitz of NYU Medical Center concluded “age is far and away the strongest risk factor for hospitalization.” Even early WHO reports noted that 80 percent of all cases were mild, and more recent studies show a far more widespread rate of infection and lower rate of serious illness. Half of all people testing positive for infection have no symptoms at all. The vast majority of younger, otherwise healthy people do not need significant medical care if they catch this infection.

        Fact 3: Vital population immunity is prevented by total isolation policies, prolonging the problem.

        We know from decades of medical science that infection itself allows people to generate an immune response — antibodies — so that the infection is controlled throughout the population by “herd immunity.” Indeed, that is the main purpose of widespread immunization in other viral diseases — to assist with population immunity. In this virus, we know that medical care is not even necessary for the vast majority of people who are infected. It is so mild that half of infected people are asymptomatic, shown in early data from the Diamond Princess ship, and then in Iceland and Italy. That has been falsely portrayed as a problem requiring mass isolation. In fact, infected people without severe illness are the immediately available vehicle for establishing widespread immunity. By transmitting the virus to others in the low-risk group who then generate antibodies, they block the network of pathways toward the most vulnerable people, ultimately ending the threat. Extending whole-population isolation would directly prevent that widespread immunity from developing.

        • 0 avatar

          @thelaine: well said.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            No, not well said, because no source quoted means more made up BS

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            “ No, not well said, because no source quoted means more made up BS”

            Translation:

            “I don’t like what you said and because I don’t know what a search engine is I’m declaring your words false!” *stomps off and has a tantrum*

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            EB, you’re too dumb to breath without Cliff’s Notes

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            What will happen if, after the COVID-19 frenzy has passed, we finally accept that our esteemed scientists’ projections were out of proportion all along and that the government’s devastating overreaction was unnecessary? (2.2 million U.S. deaths…really?)

            Who will be there to apologize and take responsibility for killing 33 million citizens’ livelihoods and leaving our prosperous economy — and the U.S. Constitution — in shambles?

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            “Who will be there to apologize and take responsibility for killing 33 million citizens’ livelihoods and leaving our prosperous economy — and the U.S. Constitution — in shambles?”

            Well, certainly NOT the REPUBLICAN administration who shut everything down. They NEVER take responsibility for THEIR actions

            I swear, theloon, you’re worse then the 4 year old in charge

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            In New York City, an antibody survey found that 21% of the city’s population had been infected with the coronavirus. This indicates that over one and a half million of New York City’s 7.2 million residents under the age of 65 had been infected. Furthermore, approximately 78% of them had no underlying medical condition that puts them at risk from coronavirus. Around the time of the antibody survey, New York City had recorded only 58 deaths of people under 65 with no underlying condition.

            In the U.S., 79% of coronavirus deaths are people 65 and older. In the 23 states releasing long-term care facilities data, 27% of deaths have occurred in such places. The Washington Post reports the share of fatalities in nursing homes may be 50%. In Colorado, the share is 50%.

            Yet our reaction isn’t to protect the elderly and those with underlying conditions. No, instead we decide to force over 214 million people under 65 with no underlying condition who are under virtually no threat from coronavirus to restrict their activities, socially distance from each other, and go into lockdown.

            Instead of targeting the vulnerable population for assistance and infection avoidance, we shut down our economy. Many of the vulnerable are elderly and out of the workforce, yet we target the workforce and push 33 million people out of their jobs. We destroy countless small businesses, risk food shortages due to the supply disruption, drive oil prices so low that it could devastate thousands of Coloradans and cause political instability and international conflicts to rise, scare people who need medical attention away from emergency room visits, and cause domestic violence to rise.

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            “ EB, you’re too dumb to breath without Cliff’s Notes”

            Breath.

            Yep you showed me.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            “Breath”

            Doesn’t count unless you do it three times in a row without looking at your notes, EB

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            “I swear, theloon, you’re worse then the 4 year old in charge”

            *than

            But keep telling us how dumb we are without providing any sort of counter argument other than name calling and tantrum throwing.

        • 0 avatar
          Luke42

          @thelaine:

          “The recent Stanford University antibody study now estimates that the fatality rate if infected is likely 0.1 to 0.2 percent, a risk far lower than previous World Health Organization estimates that were 20 to 30 times higher and that motivated isolation policies.”

          My local health department is reporting 135 cases, and 6 deaths. That works out to a 3.5% in the real world, in my town.

          This would be really bad if everyone got it. Even if you choose to ignore our moral obligations, losing 3.5% of our population works out to a 3.5% hit to our economy for the next generation or so. I ran some joint probabilities, and the number of medical bankruptcies you’d expect is pretty close to the number of fatalities, and those people are knocked out of the economy for some years as well. So, our worst-case scenario is about 7% of people being no longer able to participate in life as we know it.

          Yes, these are pessimistic worst-case numbers. If we decide to just give up on mitigating COVID-19 and let nature take it’s course, maybe 2/3rds of people will get it, so we’re talking more like a 4%-5% hit for a generation. But those are the stakes.

          Alas, wishful thinking doesn’t change the numbers an order of magnitude. If wishful thinking cured COVID-19, Georgia (where I have family) would have beat this thing already.

          • 0 avatar

            @Luke42: The issue with your numbers which I don’t doubt are what was reported is that the serology studies undertaken have shown conclusively that the actual infection numbers are significantly higher to the point that the actual fatality rates are in the .1 – .3% range. I would encourage you to track down the Stanford, USC, Boise and other serology results and read for yourself.

            The country was mislead by officials on this one. I shared this before, but the “Gates” model (which includes all the current mitigation measures in the model) which our country is using as a guideline for proper mitigation measures was way off. Not more than the Imperial College model which appears to be the trigger for lock downs (2mil US deaths – don’t think so Tim). The Gates model, for example, predicted 1300 deaths in Iowa on Apr. 1. The actual number on May 1 was 185. The information is there if you take the time to find and read it. If you rely on the MSM, you will not get all the facts. That takes effort on your part which I get as being a deterrent in a sense, but isn’t finding out the whole story worth the time?

          • 0 avatar
            TrailerTrash

            Lie2me
            as your handle suggest, you fit perfectly into the leftist camp of lies.

            however, it didn’t take long for you tpo get around to blaming trump for this.
            absolutely stupefying.
            how totally dumb you are.
            EVERYBODY here knows trump was dragged into this.
            and damned early for not doing the shutdown…and damned ever since for everything he has done.
            it doesn’t matter if you and your crowd demanded this, HE DID IT.

            and i guess, in a way, i agree…this was his big mistake…listening to the idiotic medical leftist surrounding him.
            he did let his followers down.

            however…we understand how to draw his actions in total vs your leftist constant stupidity.

            bugger off.

      • 0 avatar
        Dave M.

        So Mr. Scientist, what’s the rate of contraction v. death between the flu and Covid? When is Covid ‘season’ over? How many mutations of Covid are there so far, including the new one they just discovered affecting children only? Sounds like you have this well under control. Thanks for your hard work.

        • 0 avatar
          thelaine

          A virologist and clinical computational epidemiologist has slammed the Chinese virus model created by fellow epidemiologist Dr. Neil Ferguson of Imperial College London, whose dire mathematical models of the Wuhan coronavirus’s spread formed the basis for lockdowns in the U.K. and around the world. Scientist Chris von Csefalvay labeled Ferguson’s work “somewhere between negligence and unintentional but grave scientific misconduct.”

          Dr. Ferguson, whose advice to the British Prime Minister led to the lockdown in that country, recently resigned as an adviser to the U.K. government after breaking quarantine rules to meet his married lover, left-wing activist Antonia Staats.

          The code used by Dr. Ferguson, called by some the “architect of lockdown,” has now come under fire from another epidemiologist, Chris von Csefalvay, who called the computational code, developed by Dr. Ferguson to simulate the global spread of Chinese virus, “somewhere between negligence and unintentional but grave scientific misconduct.”

          Writing on his blog, Csefalvay took aim at Dr. Ferguson’s use of 13-year-old code to model the current pandemic, something that makes it far harder to understand.

          Via Csefalvay’s blog:

          For those who are not in the computational fields: “my code is too complicated for you to get it” is not an acceptable excuse. It is the duty of everyone who releases code to document it – within the codebase or outside (or a combination of the two). Greater minds than Neil Ferguson (with all due respect) have a tough enough time navigating a large code base, and especially where you have collaborators, it is not unusual to need a second or two to remember what a particular function is doing or what the arguments should be like. Or, to put it more bluntly: for thirteen years, taxpayer funding from the MRC went to Ferguson and his team, and all it produced was code that violated one of the most fundamental precepts of good software development – intelligibility.

          https://chrisvoncsefalvay.com/2020/05/09/imperial-covid-model/

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          “So Mr. Scientist”

          theloon is NOT a scientist, he’s smarter, more like, say, a stable genius. Yeah, they know more then any doctor or scientist, because they just feel like they’re smarter, so they are

          • 0 avatar

            Lie2me: has it occurred to you that some folks have read more articles/papers written by doctors that do know more than you or I about this? theLaine mentions the sources of much of the info shared. Go and verify instead of deriding someone sharing facts you don’t agree with. When you find things that support your view, share them to refute the opposite view. Lot more productive than posting what you have so far.

    • 0 avatar
      bobbysirhan

      “The COVID thing has really brought out the “snowflake” in lots of right-wingers who love slinging that insult around.”

      At what time on which day did Elon Musk stop being a fan of big government subsidies, a command economy, and climate change profiteering and start being a “right-winger?” The word you’re looking for is kulak. It’s his turn to be sacrificed to manipulate the sheep, and he doesn’t like being the one whose rights are being violated by the left as much as he liked having the left steal money from others to buy his favor.

      I suppose it has been a tough week for anyone who ever believed in Russian Collusion, James Comey, Barrack Obama, #metoo, or CNN. It doesn’t mean that everyone who was right about anything over the past three years is a right-winger, or that people who are coming to grips with the error of believing in big government are doing so from a position of ideological purity. The zealots are those who would consider voting for a senile rapist because the alternative is accepting one’s own failings. Maybe the politicians who agree with you being horrible people isn’t a coincidence.

      Why do people still believe the Wuhan Virus death numbers from the CDC? Overall mortality rates are down even while de Blasio is murdering black and brown people in NYC to drive the numbers and they’re classifying many an unrelated death as Corona.

      https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8262351/Nurse-New-York-claims-city-killing-COVID-19-patients-putting-ventilators.html

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        Excellent article but anyone with a basic understanding of ventilators and basic lung anatomy could have told you that.

        Ventilators were never the answer. There was never a shortage, the whole scramble to make ventilators was unnecessary and they were not the answer that everyone thought they were.

        But facts usually don’t work with people here.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          “Excellent article”

          Hahahahahahaha!

          It’s from Great Britain’s worst tabloid the Daily Fail

          Has Bugs Bunny or Elmer Fudd weighed in yet?

          EB, do you ever tire of embarrassing yourself?

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            Lie2me: “you’re embarrassing yourself”

            Reality: I’m right and you don’t like facts.

            Tell me what part of that article was wrong? New York gave back ventilators because they were not needed. Do you know basic lung anatomy? Do you know how ventilators work?

            Clearly you’re in over your head. Typical from someone who just parrots the party line and is incapable of critical thought

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            EB, you haven’t been right about anything on this site in years. Why would anyone think you are now?

          • 0 avatar
            bobbysirhan

            Lie2Me, I didn’t post that link for the article. I posted it because the Chinese agents at Google, Facebook and the Democratic party couldn’t remove the video of an NYC nurse talking about the stress of being expected to commit yet another socialist atrocity for the greater avarice of the left. Did you choose your name because you never want to be confronted with the truth? Yours is the strangest brand of self-awareness I’ve yet encountered.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            “Chinese agents at Google, Facebook and the Democratic party couldn’t remove the video”

            Your tin hat is screwed on a little tight there, bobby

            So, bobby, what brings you to TTAC? You obviously have no interest in cars. What ARE you interested in?

        • 0 avatar
          thelaine

          The “VENTILATOR SHORTAGE!” story is a great data point in the proof that we have been in the grip of a mass hysteria.

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            “ The “VENTILATOR SHORTAGE!” story is a great data point in the proof that we have been in the grip of a mass hysteria.”

            It’s laughable how much overreaction there was/is. People screaming that we need ventilators when in reality we didn’t and ventilators were contributing to the deaths. Unreal

      • 0 avatar
        Zipster

        SirhanSirhan:

        You are so completely delusional your are psychotic. Why don’t you apply to become a member of the psychopath’s staff? There you can find other people who live in an alternate reality. Or is it just because someone is paying you that you emit these vile frothings?

    • 0 avatar

      Do you have a link to an official source for the numbers you shared? CDC is under 79000 last I knew.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/cases-updates/cases-in-us.html

        Cases: 1300696
        Deaths: 78771

        78771/1300696 = .0605606
        Death rate: 6.05%

        2019 flu stats
        https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/burden/2018-2019.html

        Total cases: 35520883
        Total deaths: 34157
        34157/35520883 = .000962
        Death rate: .0962

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          Gee, FreedMike those stats sound serious, so they must be fake :(

        • 0 avatar

          Thanks Mike!

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          I’m not going to argue the ratio of actual SARS-CoV-2 infections versus deaths attributed to COVID-19 disease. Both numbers are inaccurate.

          It is rather easy to prove that SARS-CoV-2 is more lethal than influenza.

          As per the CDC web site they state that the annual influenza death rate ranges from 12,000 – 61,000 deaths ANNUALLY since 2010.

          REMEMBER – ANNUAL DEATH RATE.

          The most current statistic for COVID-19 deaths is 81,378.

          Do the math.

          SARS-CoV-2 is 1.3 to 6.8 times more lethal AND that is ONLY the tally for the first 4 1/2 months of 2020. we still have 7 1/2 months to go.

          It is patently obvious that SARS-CoV-2 is more deadly.

          Only Trumpoid simians would argue against this point!

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Exactly, Lou, and those 81,000 deaths are in a span of basically a month or two.

            People who argue this isn’t more deadly than regular flu are just…wrong. And I have no f**king idea why they’d be so willfully ignorant, though I do have some basic theories:

            1) There’s a set of Trump supporters who hate the lockdown because it’s screwed up the economy, which is the ONLY thing their guy had to run on. The fact that they’re willing to watch more people die to get that gasbag re-elected tells you everything you need to know about this group.
            2) Folks who just like being obtuse because it makes them feel smart. These are the dingbats who say, “see, it wasn’t as bad as everyone thought” and ignore that the reason it didn’t get as bad as everyone thought was all the steps taken to make that happen…which they also opposed. So, the point of the exercise was to create an argument that they’d win no matter what. (cough…cough…thelaine…)
            3) People who’ve read way too much Ayn Rand.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @FreedMike – it is frustrating to deal with blind partisans that data mine sh!t that fits their narrow narrative. Some news articles cite reports but if one pulls the actual study, it often does not say what they claim.

            Are we dealing with actual partisans or are they provocateurs of a hostile power? The latter is easier to accept over someone’s just plain stupid by choice.

  • avatar
    Lockdown

    He’s got another kid to feed, he needs his money machine back up and running. If the factory’s not running, he might have to stay home and change a diaper. That’s his real anger being stuck at home with someone more needy of attention then himself

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      According to a Forbes’ announcement this past January, Elon Musk is the 28th richest person in the world, with a net worth of $32 billion.

      I don’t think he depends on his Tesla paycheck to pay the bills.

  • avatar
    Imagefont

    The day one of those hypothetical Semis get delivered to a customer, or road legal Cybertruck is ever built, or anything remotely approaching FSD ever comes to pass, then I’ll believe he intends to make good on any of these hollow threats. Until then, well, he can just go “bleep” himself.

  • avatar
    Greg Hamilton

    Nice to see that all the commenters here believe in the Constitution.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      The constitution doesn’t matter to them. The media told them not to believe in it.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        Everything you spiel is word for word what you heard on FOX News last night

        I just wish you and like minded people would cluster together and have a party, that will sure show the rest of us how stupid we were

        • 0 avatar
          EBFlex

          Your stupidity is on display every single day. We don’t need to get together for that to be known. You are incapable of critical thought and, like a good little puppet, just regurgitate what your party wants you to believe.

          We now have at least FOUR studies showing infection rates are vastly higher than reported. Two in Commiefornia, one in New York and one in Germany. But don’t let the facts get in your way.

          Also, I don’t watch Fox news.

      • 0 avatar
        Zipster

        EBFIX

        One thing is for certain, you never went to law school.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      So if you think lockdowns make sense, you don’t believe in the constituion. Grand.

      I suggest sending your concern to the following email address: [email protected]

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        You mean the guy who declared a national emergency, shut everything down then got scared and dumped the whole mess in the governor’s laps?

        Just send your emails to chiefweenie.com, he’ll get it

    • 0 avatar
      Sloomis

      Nice to see that all the commenters here believe in the Constitution.

      The Constitution allows for legal measures that restrict individual rights for the sake of public health and well being. This was decided by the Supreme Court well over 100 years ago. So yeah, sounds like they do. It’s the right-wingers, on the other hand, who seem to have so little use for it (except for the 2nd amendment of course)…

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    I’m not sure what’s happened to that man but it wasn’t alcohol or marijuana that did it, had to be something stronger.

  • avatar
    honda1

    Elon, come to Texas, we would love to have you, preferably North Texas. Screw commiefornia the land of the mentally ill libtard politicians.

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    I’ve worked through the Pandemic at a manufacturing facility with sizable labor force. Covid cases are present. Mitigation efforts are ongoing.
    I’ll add that I am a scientist. My field is not epidemiology.

    Remaining closed or opening an automotive manufacturing facility is best left to the subject matter experts. Is Alameda County choosing it’s path based on science or politics?

    Musk and Gonzales are credible sideshow entertainers. Myself, not a fan of sideshows.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    If Elon goes, so be it .

    As mentioned, other states will pave the way for him .

    -Nate

  • avatar
    Rich Fitzwell

    I don’t have a dog in the fight, but I enjoy watching the Wall Street thieves heads pop open on Twitter as they lose their shirts shorting Tesla.

    Their invective is priceless.

  • avatar

    Those idiots in Sacramento. We already knew that. Then why we keep electing them? Yeah, Sacramento, let’s kill electric car, again, alright!

  • avatar
    anomaly149

    Eh, Musk should move part of Tesla out of Cali regardless. Why pay Cali wages to line workers, when you could pay Kansas City wages, or Wichita wages, or literally any other wages anywhere in the US?

    This is one area that shows Rivian has a good head on its shoulders: Body Engineering is in Michigan, where the good body engineers are / where you can pay Michigan wages. Manufacturing is in Normal, Illinois where you can pay smaller midwest town wages for skilled line workers. Only software (bay area) and electrical hardware (San Diego) are in Cali.

    This is also why Lucid is building a factory south of Phoenix. California wages make sense for tip top value workers, like a select few engineers and C-suite types, but not for the vast majority of the workforce.

  • avatar
    bullnuke

    I can’t really fault Musk on this regardless of what he says or does. He’s getting on that very popular and lucrative bandwagon of “Never let a crisis go to waste” that many folks regardless of motivation/political bent/et al are playing these days. Regardless of the truth (or bending of truth), sources of data (or extrapolation of data), interpretation of data (or manipulation of data) there’s a lot of money and power to be gained from this crisis.

  • avatar
    Periodic

    I very much doubt that words will turn into actions. Easier said than done…

  • avatar
    Imagefont

    Yikes, the crazies are out in force. Too much isolation?
    Too much 24/7 breaking news?
    Turn off the news, go outside and get some exercise, do an art project, plant some flowers, mow your neighbors yard just to be nice. Do something useful. And stop sounding like a bunch of conspiracy theory but jobs.

  • avatar
    Daniel J

    It wouldn’t be surprising that more and more businesses start suing the states and counties of the “public use” clause of the 5th amendment.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Elon can always pick up all his toys and go to China. I really don’t care where they make Teslas or even about Teslas. Even if I eventually bought an EV in the future I would not buy a Tesla.

  • avatar

    So, like many of us, I’m bored and looking for interesting TV. I come across a documentary about Mars and SpaceX. Now I’ve read about the cult of Elon, mostly on forums like this, but never saw it in action. They talk about the Falcon 9, which is relevant as this month, two astronauts are going up to the ISS from Florida, like God and JFK intended. They cover the design of the Falcon, and after just seeing Apollo 11, the documentary from transferred film in HD, it was a great contrast between the 60’s and 20’s “How to get into space”.

    The Mars bit was grafted onto the Falcon 9 content, but overall, every person speaking, was fully a fan of Elon. To get back to the real point of this thread, it was almost MAGA rally in love. Now, I don’t own a car company, nor have I come up with a private ride to space, but there are some accomplishments here….it may require ego-a/hole to be able to do this. Best moment-Elon tells.his 8 or 9 year old son “that’s the car we drove in” when the car in space is shown….and the kid, like all kids, doesn’t really care. They did have to put a payload in the test flight, so making it an advertisement is just good leveraging.

    May 27th, mark it, US astronauts get into space on a US built rocket….finally.

    I’m way more impressed with the Falcon program than the cult, the cars, or anything else Elon. further research shows they also took less money than Boeing for the same concept, although with Boeing, who knows what slush for other projects exists…..

  • avatar
    Zipster

    Thaline:

    What compels you to lie like you do? The Stanford “study” has been widely criticized. It was not peer-reviewed. Obviously you, or the source that provide your frothings has no mathematical ability or just likes to lie. Total cases: 1,400,000, deaths 80,000. What percentage it that? People like you presently exist for the sole purpose of spreading lies and propaganda. That is your purpose on this site and that is too subvert the truth.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      The only thing these numbnuts know is what FOX faux News tells them. Critical thinking is NOT part of their political ideology

      Their new political slogan to replace Maga is going to be “Dumb and Proud of it”

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Their political ideology is about being “anti-liberal.” They perceive the lockdowns as liberal. Therefore, they oppose them.

        Apparently states don’t have the right to enact things that restrict the rights of their citizens on “health grounds” within their borders.

        Given that most of the same states who are whining the loudest about COVID lockdowns are the same states that are spending millions of dollars in taxpayer money to bring cases to the Supreme Court seeking to restrict abortion rights on “health” grounds, doesn’t that tell you everything you need to know?

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          “They perceive the lockdowns as liberal. Therefore, they oppose them.”

          You mean the lockdown imposed by the REPUBLICAN President, that lockdown?

          The same REPUBLICAN President who is in so far over his head that he tossed the whole sticky mess to the governors then tells them to reverse what he started, then throws them under the bus (Kemp) when they do?

          Yep, it must be a liberal plot

        • 0 avatar
          Sloomis

          “most of the same states who are whining the loudest about COVID lockdowns are the same states that are spending millions of dollars in taxpayer money to bring cases to the Supreme Court seeking to restrict abortion rights on “health” grounds”

          Yep. It’s all the “pro-lifers” out there who are now saying we need to sacrifice the lives of the elderly and the vulnerable for the sake of the Republican elite’s stock portfolios, errr, I meant “the economy”. So much for sanctity of life…

        • 0 avatar
          Daniel J

          @FreedMike,

          Its also to easy to say those who are pro-lockdown are “anti-Trump”.

          I’m so tired and exhausted, even before the pandemic, of someone lumping things with a political side.

          Issues need to be issues, not political sides. We can’t even discuss constitutional issues without bringing in politics. Roadway projects? Politics. Business supply chains? Politics. The NFL? Politics.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Not really…Trump was “pro-lockdown” for quite some time as well, so was he being “anti-Trump”?

            And I’d say that the problem here isn’t that, as you say, **politics has infected everything** – it’s that our **current toxic state of politics** has infected everything. There’s nothing wrong with politics, as long as the conversation is conducted in good faith. It’s the good faith that’s missing.

      • 0 avatar
        Zipster

        Just look at all Thelying has posted in a relatively short period of time. Is he also a “very stable genius”? Hardly, he is merely drawing upon prepared sources that his far right wing employers provide him. Perhaps it is a better life than standing on street corners, wearing a dress and calling out to passing motorists. I have some respect for those poor souls. None for people like him.

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        “The only thing these numbnuts know is what FOX faux News tells them. Critical thinking is NOT part of their political ideology

        Their new political slogan to replace Maga is going to be “Dumb and Proud of it””

        Why does everything with you have to boil down to political ideology?

        Why do you ignore the fact that there are far more infections than reported?

        Why do you resort to name calling rather than supporting your position?

        Do you like seeing small businesses closing and small business owners losing their livelihood?

        The survival rate for the Corona Cold in the US is 99.983%. In Great Britain it’s 99.972%. Even that the patently false 3-5% mortality rate that means the survival rate is 95% to 97%.

        But we’re the bad guys because we want to get back to normal.

  • avatar
    redapple

    Elon’s baby momma is FREEKIE DEEKIE.
    WOOOOOOOOOOOH

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    I knew Musk would come to regret locating his factory in California, a state openly antagonistic toward business in general.

    I suspect one reason the paint on Teslas is notoriously bad is that California has outlawed the chemicals needed to make paint effective.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    Musk: How can someone so smart so consistently act so dumb? His short sighted, emotional outbursts get co-mingled with trying to dig under LA to alleviate traffic. It’s incredible these things come from 1 person.

    Can Elon’s doc up his dose of ritalin?

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      I just started watching the recent appearance of Musk on Rogan’s podcast, but the first one gave me the impression that he is tired and wouldn’t mind a break. He probably constantly and obsessively thinks about all the things he has going on and there are times when he feels worn out to the point that he’ll say whatever he wants because in that moment, deep down, he gets some relief from the idea that it may free him from his burdens.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        I’d like to free him of a couple of billion of his “burdens”

        Being a billionaire is HARD

        • 0 avatar
          Zipster

          One thing all this accomplished: Thelying overplayed his hand and established beyond any doubt that he is a paid propagandist. Does anyone believe that he composed all his long diatribes in the time he used to respond? Actually, he shamelessly and repeatedly drew upon the reservoir of prepared lies his puppet masters have prepared for him to unload to the unwary at this and other sites that he is paid to monitor. This is the kind of people we now have in this country.

        • 0 avatar

          Having billions of of $$ is a huge burden. You have to resist the urge to spend it at once. You have to come up with investment plan, financial adviser a.k.a. crooks. You suddenly discover millions of friends and relatives you were not aware about. Your wife wants divorce to get her share. You children, you children’s friends, activists, politicians – everybody want their share. Paparazzi hiding in bushes watching your every step. Man that’s tough life.

        • 0 avatar

          Having billions of of $$ is a huge burden. You have to resist the urge to spend it at once. You have to come up with investment plan, financial adviser a.k.a. crooks. You suddenly discover millions of friends and relatives you were not aware about. Your wife wants divorce to get her share. You children, you children’s friends, activists, politicians – everybody want their share. Paparazzi hiding in bushes watching your every step. Man that’s tough life.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            There are plenty of billionaires who live in relative anonymity…then we have Musk, who made himself a celebrity and says stupid crap all the time.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • namesakeone: One of the last comments on this bringatrailer.com entry, apparently from the winning bidder, states...
  • starskeptic: That mask is one of the worst photo-shops I’ve ever seen – it looks like two half masks...
  • jthorner: Tavares is realizing Marchionne’s dream. Perhaps had Marchionne never dreamed it out loud, Tavares...
  • jthorner: Hmmm, it looks like PSA might end up as the sole surviving French(ish) auto maker.
  • krhodes1: DuhMuro is an idiot on a good day. I’ve had a P38a Range Rover and now a Discovery I. Both with lots...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber