By on March 24, 2020

General Motors Renaissance Center

Following in the footsteps of rival Ford, General Motors is drawing on credit to bolster its cash reserves. The company, which announced a temporary shutdown of its U.S. assembly plants last week, is in the same basket as pretty much any other automaker operating in the country.

As well, GM — again, like Ford — sees no value in its now-outdated guidance issued for 2020. That bit of predictive analysis, like a lot of things, fell victim to the sudden and disruptive appearance of the coronavirus.

As Pundit Twitter argues over whether a certain demographic should be quickly and mercilessly rolled into the sea for the greater economic good of the country, GM beancounters are more concerned with weathering this storm, however long it may last.

The company plans to daw on its revolving credit lines for an extra $16 billion of financial cushion, padding the existing $15-16 billion in cash it expects to have on hand at the end of the month.

“We are aggressively pursuing austerity measures to preserve cash and are taking necessary steps in this changing and uncertain environment to manage our liquidity, ensure the ongoing viability of our operations and protect our customers and stakeholders,” company CEO Mary Barra said in a statement.

With the benefit of hindsight, it seems the industry’s feverish rush to streamline businesses in advance of a hazy, future economic shock wasn’t a pointless exercise in paranoia.

On March 18th, GM announced it would wind down production at all U.S. facilities until at least March 30th, with the situation evaluated on a weekly basis after that point. The company’s hand, like that of Ford and Fiat Chrysler, was guided by the United Auto Workers, which pressed for a combined Detroit Three shutdown.

[Image: General Motors]

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88 Comments on “GM Pads Wallet to Weather Coronavirus Storm...”


  • avatar
    Rick Astley

    Which begs the question:

    Will this cash actually enable GM to float the company through troubled waters, or is this simply a move to grab debt, pay some people handsomely, then foist this (plus more) debt onto the taxpayers through another 3-day bankruptcy farce?

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Answer: “yes”.

      GM is doing what Ford did before the “great Recession” and bailout: Borrowing before the financial system makes it difficult to borrow. There’s not likely to be a seizure of the financial system like 2009, but Congress has to play politics before it passes another massive tax giveaway. It’s better to borrow now, while the loan window is still open.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      “Will this cash actually enable GM to float the company through troubled waters, or is this simply a move to grab debt, pay some people handsomely, then foist this (plus more) debt onto the taxpayers through another 3-day bankruptcy farce?”

      It makes me sad how so many of you have the memory capacity of a goldfish. That’s the only reason for patently dumb comments such as yours.

      or trolling. that’s the only other explanation.

    • 0 avatar

      Rick imagine you are CEO. What you would do?

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        I doubt “Rick Astley” is qualified to manage a Dairy Queen, nevermind a multi-billion-dollar corporation. he probably can’t even manage his own f***ing household.

        He apparently is too stupid to remember that GM’s bankruptcy in 2009 came after a long stretch of successive quarters of losing billions of dollars. Like I said, he has the memory capacity of a goldfish, and lacks the self awareness to understand that.

        • 0 avatar

          I think he would take golden parachute and run away to Mexico. After several years of overspending and losing investments lost all his money and be in back to square one.

          • 0 avatar
            -Nate

            ! .

            ? How do I get a golden parachute ? .

            =8-) .

            -Nate

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Become a CEO and it’s a done deal, Nate!

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “How do I get a golden parachute ?”

            Instead of becoming a street level sociopathic petty criminal one goes to a premier university, obtains a MBA or PhD, gets into the corporate or legal world, rips off the working class or everyone with less qualified lawyers and rises to CEO level than writes their own terms of employment.

          • 0 avatar
            -Nate

            Oh crap .

            That means getting a decent ed-U-mah-kay-shun and then working my ass off (or being the lucky born) for some years….

            Too late now even if I was smart enough .

            Sigh .

            -Nate

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            -Nate – LOL.

            Most of us are born with a conscience.

          • 0 avatar
            -Nate

            FWIW, I’ve lived in Mexico and Centro America, it was nice but I’d rather live my remaining year in the U.S.of A.

            -Nate

  • avatar
    -Nate

    As a former business man I’m very skittish about borrowing money because I knew I’d have to pay it back eventually .

    No corporate bailouts / bonus’ for me .

    I wonder why the top brass @ GM Et Al. don’t take mandatory pay cuts like the rest of the work force ? .

    -Nate

    • 0 avatar
      Peter Gazis

      UAW members just got a 3% raise, and they will get another 3% raised in 2 years. When you make good money, and have a “CADILLAC” healthcare plan 3% is real money.

      – Not Nate

    • 0 avatar

      “No corporate bailouts / bonus’ for me .”

      Nate, I do not remember that Ford got bailed out by Government or got bonuses out of debt. Do you? I mean before making comments as a “businessman” get your facts right.

      • 0 avatar
        -Nate

        No, they’re being dishonest and boot licking, nothing new there .

        FWIW, I worked for decades without any raise unlike most here .

        When I was a union member, I worked eight years sans a raise although a different department got a 12% raise just by asking .

        Don’t be dishonest and try to deflect the facts, that makes you look weak and foolish .

        -Nate

        • 0 avatar
          ttiguy

          You went 8 years without a raise? To me that makes you the weak and foolish one!

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @ttiguy –
            Do you understand how collective bargaining works or how union politics works? Insulting people shows that you most likely don’t or feel safe hiding behind your keyboard.

            If one is unionized and the executive running the union sells enough of the membership on a contract, one can go 8 years and no raise. Another factor is the size or relative “weakness” of the union. A union with a large membership tends to be more powerful than a small union. Another factor is if you are in a small sub-sector of a large union. The union executive will keep the larger group happy at the expense of the smaller group. Unions in the USA have faced strong headwinds during economic downturns and have faced severe pressures from anti-union governments.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          Yeah so if you went 8 years without a raise and kept paying your union dues I gotta ask why?

        • 0 avatar

          “I worked for decades without any raise”

          You have to ask for raise, but then they will lay you off. When you are getting older you more likely to be demoted or laid off. Find the new job, but if you are over 50 it is unlikely. Unless you are member of club.

          I am talking about Valley. With unions you are screwed anyway.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            @Inside, do you understand how unions and collective bargaining work?

            A union member cannot ‘ask for a raise’. Union rates are set by the collective agreement. Which is negotiated, and then voted on by the members of the local. Often pay is set by ‘steps’ based on seniority or skill level.

            As for lay-offs, most collective agreements have lay-off provisions. These too are often based on seniority. If a more senior member is to be laid off then they can often bump a less senior worker.

            This is to prevent the employer from replacing older more experienced workers with younger cheaper ones. And also to prevent them from dumping older workers who may be slowing down due to age or repetitive over work.

          • 0 avatar
            -Nate

            Clearly the boot lickers neither understand nor care .

            I remained because I was able to take the long view, most Mechanics wind up old, broken of body and broke in dollars too even if they earned top money in their salad days .

            I’m old and disabled now but I don’t skip any meals and I like my little house and where I live too unlike so many here who endlessly snipe at anyone who’s doing better than they are .

            That’s weak, not making your way in life successfully .

            -Nate

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Nate I wouldn’t say this reflects one way or another on you. Union shop you get paid what you get paid…got it.

            But where the heck was your union in all this? I didn’t join the teachers union (did buy lawsuit insurance) when I taught because they always talked about fighting for better pay and couldn’t give me an answer when I asked why, if that was the case, teachers were paid so little in my district and had been for many years.

            Again, you do what you do when you are vested in the retirement and stuff, but it seems like the people representing you were not doing such a great job.

          • 0 avatar
            -Nate

            Correct Atr ;

            My union was close to useless but if we’d not had one at all management would have steamrollerd us like they did before America had unions .

            -Nate

          • 0 avatar
            -Nate

            Damn edit feature closed on me, sorry about mis spelling your name Art .

            The union stewards weren’t required to do much work and many wore suits instead of actual working togs so they weren’t on our side .

            When I queried this I was offered to become a steward, specifically I was told “don’t you want to get double pay and not have to work like me ?” .

            I said “no, I have a modicum of self respect unlike you” .

            Years later when I had a beef that went straight from me doing what I was told to do to a Skelly hearing (where you get FIRED) my union rep came, sat down and fell asleep .

            I had to defend my self with zero help nor idea of what the hell I was doing ~ only the single Gas Company guy saved my job .

            Nevertheless I always looked at the bigger picture and after 32 years of eating shit I’m doing just fine now .

            By they time i had 20 years in I was banned from City hall for being honest and I was also well known as a go – to guy to get problems solved, many of which were WAY out of my job description .

            -Nate

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            There has got to be an answer where Union membership can kick their union to the curb and affiliate with a better union. Between your story and the UAW taking bribes to sell their members down the river, I think maybe Unions need some competition as well. Having a shop with required membership in a particular union seems.like an opportunity to have to groups of people screw you instead of just your employer.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Because they think they are entitled to their pay and benefits. Corporate bonuses are based on stock price and earnings per share. Closing plants and eliminating products increases stock price and earnings. In retrospect it was smart to close plants and eliminate products because it is going to take a while to recover the longer the coronavirus goes on. I doubt this is the reason for GM’s current actions. CEO and top brass comes first before anything else.

    • 0 avatar
      fusaichi_pegasus

      The Detroit 3 aren’t normal corporations anymore. The government looks at them as a jobs program so theres no accountability since they’ll get bailed out.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        “The government looks at them as a jobs program so theres no accountability since they’ll get bailed out.”

        Oh aren’t we edgy.

        I’d say the ~$1 trillion the .gov spends on the military/DoD is the biggest ongoing jobs program in this country’s history. but hey, you do you.

        and why don’t you go look into how much more deeply involved European and Japanese governments are in their respective auto industries than the US .gov is in ours. You might learn a thing or two. Or apparently it’s one of those things it’s OK for them to do so long as you like their cars.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          I mean we could spend less on defense, but you can’t spend nothing. The big number could be less big, but let’s not act like we are just flushing a trillion for nothing.

          And by the way, it is 633 billion for 2020 which is a big number but less that a trillion by nearly half.

          Kind of puts the 2 trillion we are about to spend in perspective though.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            ” The big number could be less big, but let’s not act like we are just flushing a trillion for nothing.”

            strawman, since I’m not advocating spending nothing.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Maybe, but then again you are throwing around a number nearly twice as large as the actual number

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Maybe, but then again you are throwing around a number nearly twice as large as the actual number

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            I will admit I probably looked at a proposed figure from last year and ran with it.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            You aren’t wrong, the number is too big…just not that much too big.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            By most calculations the USA spends more on defense than the next 15 largest spending nations, combined.

            And Red Dawn fantasies aside, what nation is legitimately physically capable of threatening the USA?

            I do agree with the American ‘protectorate’ of allied, democratic nations. Such as Japan.

            Ike correctly predicted the undue influence of the defense industry. It is make work project that elected politicians use to pump money into their constituencies.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “Ike correctly predicted the undue influence of the defense industry. It is make work project that elected politicians use to pump money into their constituencies.”

            and tangentially related, look how cheaply and quickly SpaceX can get stuff launched vs. how many billions upon billions are being spent for Boeing/SLS to not have accomplished anything yet. All to make sure Sen. Richard Shelby can bring home the bacon.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            So @Jim, I work on Redstone Arsenal and am familiar with the SLS. I don’t think NASA could match SpaceX dollar for dollar. The SLS is, in theory not a profit making venture but something meant to push the boundaries of human exploration. It’s meant, again in theory, to put bigger stuff farther in the solar system in the name of Science and I know many talented folks on the program that could do that way more efficiently if unshackled.

            The problems is politics. The Alabama congressional delegation has shackled them with “You will do this in Huntsville (a great town, but not the easiest sell to perspective talent), and “You will utilize Space shuttle technology…most of which was developed in the 70’s”. They never really had a chance.

            At one point they were looking at modernizing the F1 design from the Saturn V. Why not look at tech from a cost no object development and see if it can get recycled and made cheaper by 50 years of advancement. Well you see, this company gives a lot of money to Mo Brooks and Jeff Sessions (back when he was there), so you need to use these shuttle main engines we have left over.

            SLS never had a chance because politicians were designing the rockets rather than the Scientists.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      The current crisis is demonstrating which jobs are truly critical to our economies. Cleaners, janitorial, public transit, retail, food, agriculture, transportation.

      It has also demonstrated the importance of maintaining manufacturing capacity, at home.

      Meanwhile a great many, highly paid executives, financial service advisors, etc remain at home, doing next to nothing.

      Perhaps the system we use to reward workers should be turned upside down?

  • avatar
    Guy A

    GM made some good moves such as getting out of Europe (Ford is stuck with a loss making business in the best of times there). They also learnt a lesson from the 2008 situation by having a fortress balance sheet and not wasting billions on share buy back. Having $15 billion in cash before borrowing gives them flexibility.

    • 0 avatar

      they failed in Europe. geesh, grasp reality already.

      • 0 avatar
        Guy A

        Yes they failed in Europe (as has Goes as measures by financials). So as I said they learnt a lesson and got out instead of piling up losses. What have you against reality??

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          Ford of Europe was profitable as recently as 2018 and the Focus and Fiesta are actually competitive products over there in their current form and sell well.

          Thia wasn’t the case at GM.

          • 0 avatar
            Guy A

            I agree the Fiesta and Focus are competitive products (shame they can’t compete over here in the US with Honda and Toyota). But Ford has lost billions over the past 20 years, just like GM. GM made the right decision to get out a couple of years ago. This along with their large cash on hand m and they are in good shape to weather this crisis.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            They arent competetive at the price point US customers pay for them…which is part of the reason they aren’t sold here anymore. In Europe they far outsell the Japanese cars. GM on the otherhand seems unable to compete with them on any Continent.

            They are also in better shape since Uncle Sugar wiped a bunch of their debt away. Over the past 20 years Ford did far better in Europe than GM. I don’t think Ford of Europe was so much of a lost cause as Opel/Vuxhaul was. I don’t know if any of them survive this and Ford does seem like the weakest, but if they don’t it won’t be because they didn’t leave a market that has been profitable more often than not. Hopefully they make it through and scave off any bailout

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            Ford for many years dominated the auto market in the UK. They have found a way to squander that through poor management.

  • avatar
    Oldschool

    Maybe GM’s moves by shutting plants down all over the world wasn’t such a bad move after all especially considering what they are having to deal with at the moment with this shutdown.

  • avatar
    thelaine

    Why are we killing our economy?

    The vast majority of fatalities in the US are the elderly and those with compromised respiratory function. In other words, the typical victims of common flu and other viruses which kill tens of thousands every year without denuding the forests of trees to make toilet paper or bringing the American economy to a grinding halt.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      because it’s not just about “old people dying.” It can be incapacitating even for younger people.

      https://www.clickondetroit.com/news/michigan/2020/03/25/coronavirus-in-michigan-heres-where-we-stand-as-of-tuesday-night/

      38 year old 911 dispatcher -dead.

      30 year old news anchor- “excruciatingly painful.”

      2 FCA factory workers (no age, but not elderly) – dead

      43 year old community leader – dead.

      Beaumont Hospitals nearing ICU capacity.

      Look past the end of your nose for once. Even for younger people who don’t die from it, they’re often unable to work for at least a couple of weeks. So you don’t see the point of keeping this from spreading as fast as it wants to? So we don’t have people making each other sick, leaving millions of people unable to work?

      Oh wait, I forgot- it hasn’t affected you (yet) so you still don’t think it’s a big deal. anyone who thinks they’re too sick to be able to work just needs to be whipped into shape in your world.

      • 0 avatar
        thelaine

        You have really gone in for the personal attacks in your comments lately, Jim. Just look at you go in this thread! What has come over you? Are you emotionally affected by the current chinese virus panic?

        I have lots of links for you that will quell your fears, if you are willing to check them out. There is so much good information out there for those who are not hysterical.

        https://www.dailywire.com/news/stanford-professor-data-indicates-were-overreacting-to-coronavirus

        https://issuesinsights.com/2020/03/23/is-the-media-ignoring-good-news-on-coronavirus/

        https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2020/03/when_youre_a_carpenter_everything_looks_like_wood.html

        https://spectator.org/how-many-lives-is-our-national-lockdown-going-to-cost/

        https://amgreatness.com/2020/03/21/covid-19-the-elephant-and-the-house-cat/

        There is a lot of good information out there. I know you won’t read it. I am just using you as a foil to post info that other TTAC readers that you have insulted might enjoy.

        There are many more links available, on request. The word is starting to get out. Economic suicide is not a good policy in response to this virus.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Interesting that you’re accusing other people of personal attacks…at the same time that you call people who are concerned and trying to do something about this virus “hysterical.” In days past, as I recall, the same people were accused of having frozen brains.

          Physician, heal thyself.

          BTW, still waiting to hear how you would slow down the transmission of the virus without slowing down the economy.

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            You are still waiting because you refuse to read information that is contrary to your fear-induced panic-stricken reactionary opinions. Your brain is frozen. The information is at your fingertips. Hint: you are asking the wrong question, as I have pointed out dozens of times. Your wide-eyed hysteria is preventing you from seeing what is right in front of you, Jim.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            you’re not the SMITR, thelaine, so stop acting like it.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Oh, no, I read most of the links you’ve put up. They just don’t answer my question.

            And thanks for calling me panic-stricken when I’m not. You were saying something about personal attacks, as I recall…

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @thelaine – mining the internet for articles that fit your particular ideology and/or world view is rather easy.
          The experts on epidemiology are for the most part all in on a 3 step process.
          1. Social distancing to stop the rise of the disease to maintain levels that allow the health care system to manage. An overburdened system is the primary reason for deaths over the 1.0% mark.
          2. Increase the capacity of the health care system to handle COVID – 19 cases
          3. Gradually relax social distancing measures and monitor rebound levels of disease.

          Ironically, culling the herd/letting the old and weak die wasn’t an option in a totalitarian Godless regime with scant regard for human rights..aka China!

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      Please tell us again what your medical or scientific background is beyond an anti-vaxxer-esque Bachelor’s of Googling? My wife is a medical researcher who’s been tapped as a front-line worker, and this is scaring the hell out of her. Why are the only doctors you seem to trust are the few who back up your position?

      • 0 avatar
        thelaine

        Even the Diamond Princess cruise ship, which was the ultimate petri dish of recycled air circulating an infection, with an elderly population, experienced a 1.25% fatality rate. New York, which seems to be, by far, the worst hot spot now, has a mortality rate hovering between 0.75% and 0.80%, and it is going down as they test more cases. That compares to 1.2% nationwide, which helps show that wherever we test and identify the virus, the numbers go way up, but the mortality goes down.

        https://www.conservativereview.com/news/horowitz-coronavirus-begin-us-matters/

        • 0 avatar
          Maymar

          So let’s say that 1.2% holds relatively steady, but it infects about 50% of the population as forecasted. With the typical mortality rate being about 0.8%, you’re adding a huge number of deaths to a system that isn’t set up to process those numbers, and likely in a much shorter period than one year. And again, this is assuming the health care system never gets overwhelmed.

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        Because it is easier for some people to advocate for sacrificing the health or lives of those they will never meet than it is to admit they were wrong in the first place.

        • 0 avatar
          thelaine

          Spring Break is over. Patience is running out and many pockets are getting empty. It is time for Americans to mobilize for war against both C-19 and fear, retake control of their own lives and go back to work armed with good hygiene, common sense and determination not to do stupid stuff. If we do not go back to work and, instead, continue on the road toward economic suicide, the damage to millions and millions of people for generations to come will be far greater and more certain than the “projected” casualty rates from C-19.

          https://issuesinsights.com/2020/03/24/time-to-step-back-from-economic-suicide/

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “Patience is running out”

            oh, poor baby.

            Boomers have never had any patience. They demand everything NOW NOW NOW. Starting with the Boomer in Chief.

            the sad thing is if they force an end to this and there’s a second wave of outbreaks, they’ll get up there and lie their a$$es off claiming they had nothing to do with it.

          • 0 avatar
            EGSE

            thelaine, do you ever get tired of displaying your sophomoric ignorance? Let’s walk your alleged mind through a few simple numbers…..

            The death rate in the U.S. is doubling every 3 days; as of this posting it is 728 total. (update, another source claims 792) If the rate of increase stays the same the total will be 1465 three days later.
            Nine days from now 2912
            12 days 5824
            15 days 11648
            18 days 23296
            21 days 46920
            24 days 93184
            27 days 186368
            30 days 372736
            33 days 745472
            36 days 1490944
            39 days 2981888

            So if the curve remains the same, in 5 and one-half weeks from today nearly 3 MILLION could be dead from this. That’s if the case fatality rate stays the same. Which it won’t because the health care system will be completely gone; the CFR will GET WORSE. And it WILL get much worse in red-state America with an older and less-healthy population with poorer access to health care. But by then there will be no health care FOR ANYONE.

            THIS IS WHY WE HAVE BREAK THE CYCLE OF CONTAGION! G0D DAMN IT, why can’t people get this?

            I feel I’m wasting my time trying to explain anything to you so go back to your moronosphere and bitch about why you’re so inconvenienced.

            For those who aren’t brain-dead, check the link. Go to the graph and mouse over the trace for the U.S. Note that for the last *nine days* the trace is a straight line.

            https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/03/21/upshot/coronavirus-deaths-by-country.html

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          and it’s easy to cherry pick the handful of dissenting voices that tell you what you want to hear and convince yourself you’ve found the “real truth.”

          it’s how whackjobs like Alex Jones find an audience, convince gullible people that they’ve found the “Truth” and are now the SMITR.

          Then, of course, they make a lot of money off of those audiences.

          • 0 avatar
            EGSE

            @JimZ – “Then, of course, they make a lot of money off of those audiences.”

            Like the Dotard in Chief said, he loves the poorly educated. A ready crop of suckers to deceive with their bull$hit.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            If one is to look at this through the cold hard lens of people like “@thelaine”, the flip side to that coin is the fact that the majority of Republicans share similar beliefs to him.

            The deniers and “let them die” proponents tend to fall into the higher risk demographics of this disease.

            In other words… COVID-19 will most likely cull the herd primarily on that side of the political spectrum. A virus shifting the political spectrum to the liberal side of the equation. To quote the orange denier”No one saw this coming”

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          No, it is easier for people to sacrafices people they haven’t met than watch their life’s work be destroyed because the government tells them to stay home then offers no support.

          If you force people to choose between themselves and somebody else, and given the small portion of the population that stands to die from this, why would you be surprised at the results.

          Government needed to prevent that choice. This far they haven’t.

          • 0 avatar
            -Nate

            This is humorous , watching the few try to reason with a mental child here .

            -Nate

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            I guess I must have dreamed up the $2,000,000,000,000 in stimulus agreed to last night? Including both direct payments and expanded unemployment benefits?

            No it isn’t law yet, but considering the months it took to pass stimulus in 2001 and 2008 this is pretty good progress. And while I’m likely not to personally come out ahead on the bill, my wife and I are both “essential” and so far haven’t been hurt much.

            I understand the impulse in scary times to fall back on selfishness but the only way we as a country will get through this is to work together, sacrifice together, and think of our fellow citizens. Not risk more of their lives in a short-sighted attempt to get back to normalcy before that is scientifically possible.

          • 0 avatar
            EGSE

            Art, do you really believe there will be an economy to “get back to” if we say “fck it, let’s back down now” while it’s still roaring through the population?

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            No @EGSE, I do not. Well, thats not true, it would come back but it would probably be at least a decade before it did so I’d just assume avoid that.

            I wrote that when it looked as if Congress was going to play their usual political games. Looks like they have managed to put them aside so I feel a bit more optimistic.

            I was simply pointing out if you make people chose between their family and yours, they are going to choose theirs. It looks like they are going to work together now and prevent that choice.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            and @Jack as I am still working (from home now), I hadn’t seen that yet. I am not at all advocating selfishness…quite the contrary. I was simply pointing out that given the direction it was heading that people were going to be presented with an impossible choice and they were going to make it in the manner that kept their family afloat. I am relieved that it looks like we have avoided that choice for now assuming the House now does their job and the President his.

            It is a staggering amount though and when this blows over we as a nation are going to need to make some tough choices on paying the bill and hopefully learn some things.

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            @Art,

            I wholeheartedly agree.

            Unfortunately the political games played by everyone involved has already delayed the bill passing by a week, which will cause real hurt for people. That doesn’t give me a lot of confidence that anything will have been learned when this blows over.

        • 0 avatar
          C5 is Alive

          “Because it is easier for some people to advocate for sacrificing the health or lives of those they will never meet than it is to admit they were wrong in the first place.”

          Not easier, just far more rational. Similarly, it’s a knee-jerk instinct for those with Leftist proclivities to immediately elevate every individual tragedy into a national crisis.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            @C5 your post sounds just like the rationale of those who participated in Aktion T4.

          • 0 avatar
            C5 is Alive

            And your invocation of Godwin’s Law does nothing to alter my low opinion of your position as nothing more than emotionally-driven hysteria.

          • 0 avatar
            EGSE

            Oh don’t worry C5. I won’t shed a tear if you go.

            The gene pool could use an upgrade.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            @C5: Why? Weren’t you the one advocating allowing the old, weak and infirm to die for the greater good of the economy? What is the difference between that and the program I referenced?

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @C5 is Alive –
            “Similarly, it’s a knee-jerk instinct for those with Leftist proclivities to immediately elevate every individual tragedy into a national crisis.”

            Thousands to hundreds of thousands of deaths that are avoidable isn’t an individual tragedy.

            Have you ever watched someone die on a ventilator with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome?

            Ask a Nurse, or a Doctor, or a Respirator Therapist what it is like. Look into their eyes when they tell you.

            Here is a good explanation:
            https://talkingpointsmemo.com/news/a-medical-worker-describes-terrifying-lung-failure-from-covid-19-even-in-his-young-patients

          • 0 avatar
            -Nate

            Speaking of ‘knee jerk’ ~

            These are the same old tired worthless comments from the younger set, they’re emotional and educational children at best and also think either the holocaust wasn’t a bad thing or that it’s another hoax….

            It’s normal for these uneducated people to say / do things then blame everyone else for the inevitable failures .

            -Nate

    • 0 avatar

      Aktion T4. Google it.

      Right to Life only appears to be a thing with the right when the potential life is wrapped by a live woman.

      Useless Eaters.

      If you’re ever in Berlin, go to the Topograpy of Terror. Its’ a great museum about how a civil society of law became a fascist dictatorship. Minor changes in law, a few partisan judges, and some dehumanization of ‘others’. It’s become a playbook now, like the V2 is the open source missle for any upstart nation.

      This ain’t the flu, buddy. Lots of “not old”, “not compromised” people are dying of it. We can’t just put grandma on an ice floe and walk away.

      We are way better than this. Science informs us that this is a finite thing, but we must allow it to burn out. Money can be replaced, life cannot.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        “Right to Life only appears to be a thing with the right when the potential life is wrapped by a live woman.”

        well yeah, it’s never been about “life,” it’s always been about keeping women under their thumbs. Funny how after some psycho blew away a couple dozen schoolkids in Connecticut, those “pro-life” people sat on their hands, claimed there was nothing they could do, and said “my guns are more important than your kids.”

        “pro-life” my a$$. Liars and hypocrites.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Here are some links to the Studebaker Scotsman with beginning MSRP of $1,776.

    https://www.hemmings.com/stories/article/plain-and-simple-1958-studebaker-scotsman

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Studebaker_Scotsman

    “The Scotsman had features reminiscent of the “blackout” cars of the shortened 1942 model year, from which chrome trim was eliminated by war-materials rationing, though such refinements have been added by latter-day enthusiasts.”

  • avatar
    cprescott

    Witch Barra Motors should still have around $20 billion of taxpayer dollars to keep it afloat since they never made us whole with their IPO. I do hope that company bites it. Sinking it would be a delicious dessert.

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    I’m amazed nobody mentioned the Vega or the GM 1980s X-platform. Both were heavily advertised “breakthrough” designs that went to market way too soon, before the bugs were worked out.

    The X-platform was actually improved by the time the plug was pulled, but the Vega rusted away before all the bugs were worked out. If GM hd put out the 1985 model in 1980, the X-platform would have been a huge success, instead of sales dropping like a stone in ’81 when word got out that it was half-baked.

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    I’m amazed nobody mentioned the Vega or the GM 1980s X-platform. Both were heavily advertised “breakthrough” designs that went to market way too soon, before the bugs were worked out.

    The X-platform was actually improved by the time the plug was pulled, but the Vega rusted away before all the bugs were worked out. If GM had put out the 1985 model in 1980, the X-platform would have been a huge success, instead of sales dropping like a stone in ’81 when word got out that it was half-baked.

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