By on March 13, 2020

Eager to make a good impression with its first serious inductee in the wild world of electrification, Ford has released winter testing footage of the Mach-E crossover. While primarily an opportunity for the Blue Oval to show its pre-production prototypes drifting through a white background, Ford also wanted to take the opportunity to explain that the all-wheel drive variant has proven particularly popular among those placing preorders.

According to the manufacturer, reservations were strongest in California, Nevada, Colorado, Arizona and Washington. The Midwest also had elevated take rates, with snowier states opting for all-wheel drive three-quarters of the time. Ford said that ratio jumped to 9 in 10 pre-orders for areas like New England, proudly announced that reservations have finally been made in all 50 states. However, it stopped short of giving up the total number of orders placed, encouraging us to do some digging. 

After combing through several auto forums, it seems the company locked in about 45,000 orders based on assigned reservation numbers. That’s assuming Ford numbered the Mach-E sequentially — at least 4,000 are presumed to be intended for corporate use and were set aside by the manufacturer before the order books officially opened. However, if interest remains steady through the summer, its plan to build 50,000 units in the first year won’t be undone by a lack of demand.

The Mustang Mach-E starts at $43,895 (minus the available $7,500 federal tax incentive). That should make it a fairly appetizing item against the pricer alternatives coming out of Europe and California. Even if you’re not sold on the styling, Ford appears to be offering one of the quickest and most affordable electric crossovers on the market (at least on paper). We’re curious to see how it stacks up against the Jaguar I-Pace, Audi E-Tron, and Tesla Model X when deliveries begin this fall.

 

[Image: Ford Motor Co.]

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54 Comments on “Ford Mach-E Continues Amassing Orders While Playing in the Snow...”


  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    This is the most awesome thing in the history of things.

    (I know that because I watched the entire video, which was about 3 times longer than it needed to be.)

  • avatar
    JEFFSHADOW

    Reminds me of the excellent press the 1966 Oldsmobile Toronado received starting in the summer of 1965! By 1969 this FWD luxury car got standard front disc brakes.

  • avatar

    What, Ford, EVs do not suck? Common guys, EBFlex, cprescott, pile in, it gets boring here!

    Yeah, but what about range anxiety? Batteries do not last at cold climate.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      They are over in the Jeep Clutch forum blaming drivers for the exploding clutches.

    • 0 avatar
      rudiger

      Range anxiety in the cold Midwest was the first thing that came to my mind, as well. Not going to be so great with lots of stranded Mach-Es due to depleted batteries needing tows.

      Not to mention how useful all of that instantaneous electric torque will be in the snow.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        “Not going to be so great with lots of stranded Mach-Es due to depleted batteries needing tows. Not to mention how useful all of that instantaneous electric torque will be in the snow.”

        How many EVs have you seen stranded with flat batteries? It doesn’t happen, because EV drivers plan every trip.

        Torque: I’ve driven EVs through five winters now. Ever hear of traction control? “https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IaiA0a_6dF4”

    • 0 avatar
      syncro87

      Random anecdote. I was picking up my daughter from karate class and noticed another parent loading up her Bolt. Asked her how she liked it. Love it, she said. It was a cold day, so I asked about cold weather and range. Said in the really cold stuff, she loses about half her range. So maybe 125 miles instead of 250-ish. I’d be more excited about 250 than 125, but I could probably live with 125 the vast majority of the time. I live in a major (midwest) metro area, though, and could see how if you lived in rural Kansas, this might be a problem.

  • avatar
    Tele Vision

    I like that Ford had to sell thousands upon thousands of gas-chugging trucks ( like mine ) to fund this thing.

  • avatar
    Michael S6

    looks like a well rounded package and one of few Ford vehicles that I have any interest in. Will have to test drive it and wait a year for Ford teething pains before consider getting one. Generally speaking not a good idea to be first one on the block with a brand new vehicle.

  • avatar
    Imagefont

    But, but, but… Tesla has like a million orders for the Cyber Truck thing and it’s supposed to be even cheaper! And it’s coming out right after the Semi, if you can remember back that far….
    /s

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Once again, you’re suggesting that Tesla won’t deliver these products. But of course, Tesla has delivered every product it has promised.

      Admittedly, the first one they *won’t* deliver will be Full Self Driving.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        The question of “Will Tesla deliver (x)” is obsolete. But the Cybertruck is so bloody weird that the questions people should be asking are:

        1) is it actually going to be like that in its production form, and
        2) if so are enough non-Tesla fans going to turn those piddly $100 reservations into sales of $40-70k trucks which look like it?

        retro-futuristic styling for its own sake is all well and good, but if the only people who are willing to buy one are sci-fi consuming Tesla fans for them to park next to their Model 3/Y, that’s not huge growth. Not everyone thinks Total Recall (1990) depicts a world they want to live in.

        IMO the part of the story people are missing is that if TTAC’s estimates are accurate, we finally have indications of a non-Tesla BEV that will actually sell in fairly large numbers.

        • 0 avatar
          SCE to AUX

          “we finally have indications of a non-Tesla BEV that will actually sell in fairly large numbers”

          And that would be great.

        • 0 avatar
          Pug

          Has anyone seen a Mitsubishi Xpander? It’s a 3-row CUV huge in SE Asia. It’s the closest thing I’ve seen in side profile lines and overall design language to a Cybertruck. Obviously it’s smaller. I’m waiting to see if some crafty Filipino or Indonesian chops one up and makes a mini single-cab Cybertruckish thing.

          https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/86/2018_Mitsubishi_Xpander_Ultimate_1.5_NC1W_%2820190623%29.jpg/1280px-2018_Mitsubishi_Xpander_Ultimate_1.5_NC1W_%2820190623%29.jpg

          https://s31.wheelsage.org/picture/m/mitsubishi/xpander_cross/mitsubishi_xpander_cross_50.jpeg

  • avatar
    Imagefont

    No, Tesla has not delivered every vehicle introduced and for which they took reservation money. The Cyber truck is a show vehicle and not really buildable as presented. It would have to change radically to become a real product. Projected pricing was completely unrealistic as well. $100 reservations mean nothing for a fantasy.
    There is no Semi.
    There is no Roadster 2.
    Nor is there a timeline for these vehicles.
    Why would they accept reservations and deposits, or whatever you want to call the money they have accepted, for vehicles with no production time horizon?
    Why not, I suppose, is the question, when it comes to Tesla.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      There is no Ford Mach-E, either. By your standard, Ford is lying.

      Tesla has laid out timelines for future product, but it’s TBD if they meet them. BTW, the Model Y is out 6 months early.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        The model Y is noteworthy (though I don’t believe deliveries have started) in that it is the first vehicle Tesla has delivered on time. That being the case, it is heavily based on the model 3 which has been in production for some time now.

        Someone taking the Cybertruck’s delivery date with a grain of salt is simply acknowledging the reality that Tesla has a spotty record in this regard. If you are willing to wait, cool, but given that they have yet to select a site for the factory I think again, acknowledging that the timeline may be optimistic on this one is simply acknowledging reality and past performance here.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          Model Y deliveries started today. Customers are already posting videos of their new Y’s on youtube:

          youtu.be/G013IzEAkLg

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Again, this would be a first. Given that they have yet to pick a place to build the plant I think it was going to be a stretch to make those deadlines.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            The Cybertruck is due late 2021. I think they could go from factory groundbreaking to production in less than a year. So, they could start in December 2020 and still make the schedule. Shanghai was in less time than that.

            You also have to consider that the Cybertruck is much simpler to construct than previous vehicles. No paint shop needed. An exoskeleton with flat surfaces and flat glass is far less complex than a unibody or body-on-frame to manufacture. We’re talking about brake presses to bend the panels and some welding. I admit it’s been a lot of years since I was in the business of helping bring new auto plants to life, but I think it might take less than 9 months for a Cybertruck plant even if they run into problems.

            https://www.cnet.com/roadshow/news/tesla-cybertruck-engineering-steel-production-sandy-munroe/

          • 0 avatar
            ToolGuy

            Today I learned that the Bollinger B2 can carry 16-foot cargo through the full-length pass-through (with both liftgates closed). [19’4″ with the liftgates open.]

            https://bollingermotors.com/bollinger-b2/

            Which means I could carry 20-foot sections of square tubing home with no cuts and maybe 2 feet flagged out the back (front liftgate closed).

  • avatar

    Just to set things straight: Tesla’s Cybertruck was designed with Lunar and Martian colonies in mind. While whatever Ford came up with is Earth bounded.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      LOL. like the Cybertruck would last 2 minutes on the surface of Mars.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        “LOL. like the Cybertruck would last 2 minutes on the surface of Mars.”

        A start would be to add a radioisotope power system and several kilos of plutonium dioxide to recharge the batteries and keep things warm. What else am I missing?

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          Radiation hardening of its electronics?

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            “Radiation hardening of its electronics?”

            That can be done. I’d think the tougher part would be rubber or any other parts that would have problems in the extreme cold. Close the door and the seals would probably shatter. Lubricants would be an issue too.

          • 0 avatar
            EGSE

            “Radiation hardening of its electronics?”

            Shielding for total dose. Triple module redundancy for single event upsets. Silicon on sapphire where you can.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “That can be done.”

            you make it sound so simple. it’s a matter of more than just shielding, you know.

            still no one explains exactly what about the Cybertruck makes it “designed with Mars in mind.” Other than the fact that it looks like what 30 year old movies portrayed rolling around on Mars, that is.

          • 0 avatar
            EGSE

            Jesus Jim, lighten up. MCS is right, it can be done. It has been done. And I’ve done it. On many projects, both short mission LEOs with modest rad requirements on up to Spitzer Space Telescope outside the Earth’s magnetosphere. There are space heritage designs in Mars orbit and on the surface to serve as guides for future missions. My design on SST lasted 16 1/2 years, right through the “warm mission” in a challenging environment to the day it was shut down. BTDT. And on other projects it was electrical ground support equipment under contract. Where my screen name came from.

            Whomever it was aimed at, your snap-back was unwarranted.

            Chill out.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            I’m just irritated at the blasé attitude about Mars and the people who act like it’s just a series of simple steps to full-blown colonies, and of course they’ll all happen because Elon’s done everything he said he would so far.

            I know radiation hardening can be done. I’m saying the notion that *this* Cybertruck is designed for life on Mars is nonsense.

        • 0 avatar
          EGSE

          “What else am I missing?”

          “Alex, I’ll take *magnetosphere* for 200”.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          Fix that window glass. Those storms get pretty bad on Mars.

      • 0 avatar

        All Mars rovers are/were EVs. I do not think ICE will function on surface of another planet unless you want carry liquid oxygen with you. I think I can surmise Elon’s thought process. Why does he need bullet proof truck which looks like interplanetary rover?

  • avatar
    tylanner

    One honest look at a Model Y and this turns into a kiddie 12V ride-on.

    Any serious prospective buyer should be highly skeptical of anything being produced by this company…

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Are you referring to the Model Y or the Ford Mach-E?

      I’d consider both Ford and Tesla experienced at building vehicles. The Model Y is largely a lifted Model 3, and a Model Y just became Tesla’s 1 millionth vehicle built.

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    Looks better than any Tesla and I’m pretty sure it won’t be manufactured in a tent.

    My FWD 2013 Volt has soldered through 3 MN winter on some of the worst snow covered roads without a problem. I’m sure the 350 pound battery helped. Those 2 -32F mornings on way to work last winter weren’t an issue either thanks to the ICE back-up generator.

    • 0 avatar

      “I’m pretty sure it won’t be manufactured in a tent.”

      Are you serious or just kidding? Never heard about new Explorer, I mean the process how it is built? It is worse than in a tent.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        Tesla’s are “Clown Cars” because they’re built in tents – get it! I like what they’ve done to push EV’s mainstream but I’d never own one because:

        A – Something about them just looks cheap and low rent to my eyes.
        B- I drive my vehicles a long time & I have no faith that a Tesla as a DD in MN can go the long haul.

        I’ll wait for a Caddy EV or a Ford EV product. Maybe Lincoln will build/offer something.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Caddy EV? That did exist briefly and failed miserably.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            Cadillac has never built an EV, if your referring to the ELR that’s a hybrid like my Volt. If I didn’t have 3 kids to cart around I’d would have loved to have purchased the one that was at the same dealership where I got my Volt. They’re an awesome car, stunning styling & fabulous to sit in. GM’s mistake was they asked way too much for them.

          • 0 avatar

            It was hybrid.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    So many orders… but how many will not be cancelled and delivered?

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      There will be cancellations, but that’s par for the course.

      The Model 3 suffered many cancellations (including mine), but I attribute that to the long delivery wait and the iffy quality on the early builds. Ford should do better on delivery and quality, hopefully.

      Honestly, if this vehicle didn’t have the word “Mustang” in its name, I don’t think it would warrant much interest. Ford’s conversion of “Mustang” into a family of products was controversial, but genius.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I crunched numbers a while back and found based on the limited information I could find Tesla only delivered on about 1/3rd original reservations. This seemed to due more to cancellations than Tesla’s ability to manufacture that amount of Model 3s. Between standard cancellations, Model Y, and now CoronaChan it will be interesting to see how many orders/reservations etc turn into sales (this also assumes Ford delivers on time).

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Additional: Given the reality of the situation, I do not believe this model will succeed. While we all know the EV F-150 is for all the marbles, Ford was foolish to build this specific model in this styling and configuration.

          Ford wanted to showcase its EV technology ahead of F-150 in order to:

          1. Draw attention to themselves as an EV mfg.
          2. Get dealers trained/used to dealing with EVs.
          3. Attempt to capture the stylistic but useless SUV market (i.e. BMX X6).

          On the first point they will meet will medium success. By emasculating their second most valuable marque, Mustang, they have caused quite a stir between the Mustang faithful and well, everyone else. Their attitude to the “Ford” people is bite us because if you are really shopping Mustang there isn’t much else in the segment and Ford’s entry is probably the best one (Challenger though isn’t a pony car IMO). They will not lose you by insulting the marque but they hope to gain new customers (iffy).

          On the second point, yes I agree fielding something was a good idea. Dealer techs will need to be retrained, probably sales staff too and this buys time to accomplish it.

          On the third point, Ford will not succeed. People will not associate ugly hipster mommy mobile but Mustang with “cool” or “stylish”. Luxury can pull this garbage off but not a mainstream marque. Ford as a marque is not luxury, nor is it premium. They thought they could get around this by “Mustang=cool” but it won’t work, especially given Model Y (who could pull it off)and Corona-Chan.

          If they were serious they should have launched the Edge as an EV and attempted to capture whatever non-Tesla EV wagon market exists. If they were really serious they’d put out an Escape version of this within reasonable distance of the gas version as Toyota does with the hybrid version of its products now. But that’s probably too expensive, so the Edge/Flex crowed would have been a much better target since some of them will option up those things for whatever reason. Alas.

          The much smarter move for Ford would have been to quietly build a US intended Transit Connect/Transit and capture the small commercial transport market. Evidently they tried this ten years ago but it was priced at 57K:

          https://www.plugincars.com/ford-transit-connect-electric

          Then in the UK, they do sell products such as this:

          https://www.ford.co.uk/shop/specialist-sales/fleet/phev

          This is where I would have sunk my Mock-E money, in being the dominant player in this market.

          Oh and btw, unless something changes this model is going to debut in Q3 just when the whole world will be in the grips of financial recession. Guess it will just put more onus on the F-150 then.

  • avatar

    Something went terribly wrong TTAC style.

  • avatar
    SuperCarEnthusiast

    “ We’re curious to see how it stacks up against the Jaguar I-Pace, Audi E-Tron, and Tesla Model X when deliveries begin this fall.”

    The Tesla Model Y has just been delivered to the public! Model Y is the direct competitor to the Mach E!

  • avatar
    cprescott

    Good for Ford. Now if they can build them better than an Explorer and Tesla 20% first pass quality sales rate, then Ford could become a serious electric car producer. The only problem with Ford is that likely 5% will be built well enough to sell and send 95% to a rework lot. And that will make Tesla’s 20/80 seem like well built in comparison.

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