By on November 6, 2019

If you’re eagerly anticipating next year’s launch of the redesigned Ford F-150, Tesla CEO Elon Musk’s past claim that the Tesla pickup will rub its face in the dirt probably doesn’t have a lot of pull. Placed in a Venn diagram, these two camps — Tesla diehards and F-150 superfans — likely overlap very little, if at all.

That said, there’s still plenty of buzz surrounding the upcoming pickup, which we now know will make its debut on November 21st. Unless it becomes official, there’s no way we’re using Musk’s preferred name for the model.

That infuriating word is “Cybertruck,” which Musk used to refer to the electric pickup when announcing the reveal date via Twitter on Wednesday. Tech blogs will no doubt be in attendance when the model’s clothes come off at an L.A. venue near Musk’s SpaceX rocket facility.

It’s interesting that this reveal is scheduled to occur at the same time as — and in close proximity to — the L.A. Auto Show; in the past, Tesla has shunned the outdated concept of industry trade shows, preferring instead to march to the beat of its own drum. Disruption, and all that.

It was well known that the pickup would arrive in November, though Musk’s announcement contained no details about when future reservation holders might get their hands on a real one. The Model Y crossover, based on the Model 3, launched in March; deliveries aren’t expected until next summer. So yes, there’s a significant lag when it comes to Tesla products. The automaker uses that gap to collect deposits, find a production site, and get around to arranging suppliers and the necessary tools of assembly.

Calling it “a better truck than Ford F-150,” Musk has claimed the pickup will boast a range of 400 to 500 miles, offer a spacious cabin, and look like something that drove out of the future. Hence the name Cybertruck, a word that makes this writer’s skin crawl. Starting price is said to be less than $50,000, but you can bet that stripped-down model will not be first to land in driveways. If it’s anything like the Model 3, the entry-level variant might be the rarest thing on the road.

Adding a new level of nerdiness to the whole affair, Musk pointed to a cinematic coincidence to bolster the unseen truck’s cred — specifically, that the current month is the same one featured in the futuristic sci-fi film Blade Runner. That 1982 flick was set in Los Angeles in November, 2019.

The earliest you’ll see a Tesla pickup in the flesh, driven by a private owner, will likely be no sooner than 2021.

[Image: Tesla]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

32 Comments on “Tesla Pickup Has a Reveal Date; Availability Still TBD...”


  • avatar
    Hummer

    So is it going to be midsize or full-size? The F-150 EV will laugh this off the stage if it comes out as first gen Tundra sized.

    And according to the B&B the ROW have drivers incapable of driving a normal American sized vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      ” The F-150 EV will laugh this off the stage if it comes out as first gen Tundra sized.”
      — Why?

      “And according to the B&B the ROW have drivers incapable of driving a normal American sized vehicle.”
      — Who?

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        “ Why”

        Because the market for doing actual truck stuff is, especially today when the midsize trucks are using car engines, Pretty much reserved for the full-size class. You don’t see midsize trucks pulling a tandem axle dump trailer with mulch and you don’t see a midsize truck pulling cars on a trailer behind them.

        “Who?”

        Well you in particular.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          @Hummer: Well, the funny thing about that is that I don’t see F-150s pulling tandem-axle dump trailers either. Nor do I see F-150s pulling cars on a trailer behind them. Those kinds of duty tend to go to the F-250 or -350 models and equivalents.

          What I do see more often than not is mid-sized trucks carrying a fully loaded bed of ‘stuff’, anywhere from lawn and garden supplies to trash to … junk–indescribable volume of assorted objects that may or may not be work-related for the driver. Except in relatively rare circumstances, the smaller (not small) trucks are doing more real work while the full-sized trucks are serving as open-backed family station wagons–many even with bed covers that enhance the station wagon look.

          Oh, and I have seen midsized trucks pulling cars on a trailer behind them. After all, my own “car-engined” Chevy Colorado has a 7000# towing capacity–more than enough capacity to tow a car on a U-haul carrier. Some of the new Full-sized F-150s and Sierra/Silverados (and Rams) can’t even tow that much.

          And what is your definition of ROW, a group to which you portend I belong?

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Where do you live that it’s not common for F150s to be towing tandem axle trailers loaded with yard supplies or cars or etc? 3/4 ton seem to be more involved towing 38’+ travel trailers and skidsteers from what I see.

            They can make a Colorado with a 10k towing capacity for all it matters, you would be nuts to try and pull 7k #s with that truck more than just a short distance, weight and stability are important in towing and the Colorado doesn’t have that on the small and narrow platform it’s built on.

            I didn’t include you in the ROW, I said that yourself among others have made it a point of contention that the ROW is incapable of driving pickups that Americans love.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            I own an F150 and routinely pull a car trailer (enclosed and open) as well as a 30 foot travel trailer. No way my old Frontier was up to that on a regular basis.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            And Hummer is correct…longer wheelbase is your friend when towing. The midsizers are all white knuckle rides with a big trailer behind them.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @Hummer; @Art V: I live in a county known as “Ceciltucky”, which is quite rural in and of itself, though also serves as a bedroom county for a couple of big cities both north and south. The vast majority of F-150s I see towing ANYTHING are towing utility trailers often smaller than their own beds. Until state laws banned “rolling coal”, I saw diesel versions with one or two gigantic stacks rising behind the cab. I still see them with big cans behind the rear wheel (usually passenger side) but they’re being very, VERY careful to avoid blowing smoke.

            F-150s (and other half-ton trucks) are currently limited to roughly 10,000# towing, plus or minus a bit. The ones using “car engines” (meaning 2.7L or smaller turbo fours) are typically limited to 5000# towing. And by no means is the Colorado a “small and narrow platform” as you describe; the old “compact pickups” maybe but those didn’t carry the Colorado name. And where I do see someone towing a travel trailer with an F-150, I have to laugh out loud because the hitch is almost invariably just an inch or two from the pavement because the driver doesn’t know how to hook up a load-leveling hitch properly. My Colorado is already rigged for towing and it has plenty of wheelbase for the job within its rated limits. I’ve already towed with it and it drove like there was nothing behind it; no instability whatsoever.

            So come back up to the present and realize that today’s mid-sizers are NOT the same as 20+ years ago!

            Oh, and you never did define “ROW”. Care to do so now?

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            You said you never saw F150’s pulling anything. I said mine pulls regularly. Because a truck isn’t pulling max payload/weight all the time doesn’t mean it doesn’t do so frequently. Curious, is your truck ever empty? Wouldn’t a Transit Connect suit your needs most of the time? I mean I should sell my Fiesta…typically the hatch and back/passenger seats are empty. Of course it couldn’t have pulled the Leaf to get a new windshield yesterday (it was destroyed…had a hole where the hood corner punched it so not drivable).

            And I am not sure what people in your neck of the woods inability to hook up a trailer has to do with anything. I rarely see such shenanigans on any tow vehicle.

            Bottom line, my truck, and most folks with trucks I know of any size are used for “truck stuff” way more than my old Miata was out doing “sports car stuff”.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            • You said you never saw F150’s pulling anything.
            — I said I never saw them towing anything such as you described. You know… “Real Work.”
            • Curious, is your truck ever empty?
            — Less often than you might believe.
            •Wouldn’t a Transit Connect suit your needs most of the time?
            — In two words, *ell no! I need an open bed for when I’m carrying aromatic items and I have a tonneau to protect things when they’re weather-sensitive–a folding tonneau so the majority of the bed is accessible, no matter what I might want to carry.
            • I mean I should sell my Fiesta…typically the hatch and back/passenger seats are empty.
            — If it only has two doors (not counting hatch) and it weren’t a Ford, I’d keep it. It’s a good toy car.
            • Bottom line, my truck, and most folks with trucks I know of any size are used for “truck stuff” way more than my old Miata was out doing “sports car stuff”.
            — Around here, most full-sized trucks are doing Miata stuff while the Real Work is done by mid-sized trucks. The exceptions are the ¾ and full-ton trucks that work for the farms, hauling and towing bales of hay that tower over the carrying/towing vehicle or tow some of a farm tractor’s plowing/disking/etc. tools that the tractor itself isn’t allowed to tow on the roads due to their slow speeds and large size or are already towing something so large it takes up a lane and a half on a two-lane highway. (No, I don’t know how many bottoms they have on their plows… it looks like at least 8 but I’ve seen some that have to be towed sideways (ingenious design) that are almost twice as long as the tractor itself (large four-wheel-drive rigs a Miata could dart under between front and rear axles OR straight between the wheels, were it not for whatever the tractor is towing at the time.

            In other words, there are work trucks and ‘toy’ trucks and the half-ton models tend to be the toys while the mid-size and ¾-ton-plus models do the work.

            Of course, YMMV.

  • avatar
    Imagefont

    No one is excited or expecting much from Tesla in terms of a pickup truck. $50,000 starting price is laughable and out of sync with the prices they charge for their existing vehicles. It would have to be a Model 3 with a pickup bed – and Model 3 Ranchero / El Camino to be priced anywhere near $50,000. Just more noise and free publicity, the vehicle has no future. No design, no development, no R&D, no budget, no nothing. And that puts it five years away if they start today, and they won’t do that. And it’s going to need a very big battery, the most expensive component of the vehicle.
    They can’t even redesign the S and X!
    Maybe they should work on the Semi and Roadster since they’ve already collected money for those.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      “No design, no development, no R&D, no budget, no nothing.”

      What do you think Tesla will reveal on November 21 – an artist’s rendition? Tesla has had running prototypes at every product reveal in the past.

      Please enlighten us.

      • 0 avatar
        civicjohn

        SCE, please enlighten us. there’s 2 semis and 2 or 3 roadsters. So I guess we’re going to see a showroom floor of “cybertrucks” on the release day?

        • 0 avatar
          SCE to AUX

          “Imagefont” was suggesting that November 21st will bring us nothing to show, and that Tesla isn’t even working on a product. That would be a first for Tesla.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Another first would be it getting to market when they say it is supposed to. This will likely be the third electric pickup to market…behind both Ford and Rivian. Also all this cyberpunk bladerunner crap is nonsense and an answer to a question nobody is asking.

            I certainly think Tesla could build a real pickup, but all of the teasers lead me to think this will be something for the Tesla faithful, not a serious truck for people who make their living off of trucks. This truck from what I have seen won’t be different and revolutionary, it will be different to be different in a market that has spent 60 years with customers telling manufacturers exactly what they want and need. It’s a real shame honestly and I hope that isn’t the case.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      “$50,000 starting price is laughable and out of sync with the prices they charge for their existing vehicles.”
      — I don’t think so. ASP (Average Sales Prices) will likely be in the $80k – $90k price range.

      ” It would have to be a Model 3 with a pickup bed – and Model 3 Ranchero / El Camino to be priced anywhere near $50,000.”
      — An almost certainly invalid assumption.

      To be quite blunt, nothing you said is based on fact. It’s all opinion based on assumptions more likely to be invalid than true.

      Choosing not to remodel the S and X doesn’t mean they can’t.

      • 0 avatar
        Imagefont

        Vulpine
        Well I guess we’ll find out soon enough. But I base my assumptions on past behavior. If you recall there was a lot of lead up to the Model 3, because that was a real car. There was NO lead up to the Semi and the Roadster2, because those were “stock pumping” vehicles that were not (and are not) on track to actually be produced any time soon. You will note Tesla’s greatly suppressed CapEx. I think it’s likely they’ll have another hand built show car (truck) to show off and drive around the stage. That’s miles away from actual production. If and when they decide to build anything new I’m sure we’ll see it coming a long way off.
        Meanwhile: solar roof tiles….

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          @Imagefont: You’re making invalid assumptions. “There was NO lead up to the Semi and the Roadster2, because those were “stock pumping” vehicles that were not (and are not) on track to actually be produced any time soon.” Both vehicles are on track, with the truck due to start production next year, though I agree that we don’t know WHEN the Roadster will.

          I have not noted any great suppression of Tesla’s CapX; in fact, it appears higher than ever at $61B+.

          Honestly, I see you as an anti-Tesla zealot, working hard to belittle a brand for no apparent reason.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    This thing will command King Ranch money for what will amount to being an electric Ranger, and I mean the old Ranger. The silver lining here is perhaps it will be Tesla to finally offer a small truck again instead of today’s “mid” size trucks which are 80% of “full” size and full size trucks which are gigantic in nearly every configuration.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    Tesla has a pretty good sized cultish following.
    You see pictures of year old Model 3s rusting like a 72 Vega in Cleveland and the faithful claim its because the owner didn’t do a half dozen things like coatings, mud flaps, etc.
    Some percentage of those folks want a pickup truck, and I suspect Tesla is the only one they’ll buy.
    With the vaunted Tesla “autopilot” there will be fleets of these delivering landscape stuff, building materials, auto parts etc without need for expensive drivers.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Interesting summary of the quality problems, from insideevs (which is heavily, but not exclusively, pro-Tesla):

      https://insideevs.com/features/377882/issues-tesla-model-3-guide/

      For now at least, I’m glad I got a Hyundai instead – no drama, no quality issues.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        I was purchasing a Tesla but backed out. My friend has a 3 that has had some stupid issues. Also looking at the rebuild channels on YouTube and seeing how they are actually designed has made me steer clear. Bottom line, if those cars were Ford’s or GMs the “best and brightest” would be skewering them, and rightly so. My kid’s Leaf is a practical car that happens to be electric and you know what, when he wrecked it I ordered parts and Nissan shipped them to my door in a couple of days. No waiting, no authorized dealer BS. It’s like a real car from a real company. The supercharger network is currently the only real plus I see to more pedestrian offerings (lower range, but also tens of thousands less money). It is a real advantage but if electrics become truly mainstream it is a temporary one.

        I actually like the Mini electric. Yes, it is compromised but it is the one so far I could foresee getting me out of my Fiesta ST if the handling lives up to the hype.

        • 0 avatar
          Luke42

          I’m one of those Tesla superfans, BUT the reason I’m a fan is that they’re accelerating the future. Musk is actually doing all the stuff that my friends and I talked and dreamed about in engineering school.

          There’s room for more than one EV maker.

          The more people at the EV party the better.

          If your driving anything other than a boring ol’ gas engine, I’m going to find what you’re driving interesting.

          P.S. I’m going to be excited to see the electric F-150, too!

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I see your overall points but I’m not sure economics will allow for another Tesla. I very much doubt even the established players are making dime one on the EV products they offer. The fact Tesla still even exists is proof it had/has very powerful backers.

  • avatar
    BrandonHarlow

    I think if I can lease it for 3-4 years at the same cost of a lariat ultimatum…its worth trying. Why not? Fun to have something different. Big plus if it’s a drag racers nightmare. I’m all for it! I’ll take the first one for a discount just to show people it’s not that bad. I’ll also tell Elon he built a joke if it completely sucks! Bring on the e truck!

  • avatar
    N8iveVA

    I assume it really won’t be called Cybertruck when it comes time for production. Too bad Model T has already been used.

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    When I get rid of the Volt, I’ll go full on EV but as fas as my PU truck I’ll keep that gas. An EV PU wouldn’t work for me about 90% of the time I got in it. They might be good in a fleet application.

    Tesla’s manufacturing abilities leave something to be desired……..look elsewhere for your EV PU.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      Can’t argue your statements–you’re quite right about being ideal for fleet work in construction and services where they don’t drive all that far.

      On the other hand, I have to ask how you use your pickup that would prohibit the use of an EV version. 90% of the time for me is still local driving in my Colorado but I do take the occasional longer trip that would require the use of high-speed chargers (at 400-500 mile range not an issue when lightly loaded) but I bought the truck because the wife wants to tow an RV, where range would be halved (even a gas/diesel sees reduced range when towing.) I just want to understand your reasoning as to why it couldn’t work for you.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        All my local driving is done with the Volt. Currently I don’t have a PU but in another year or two I’ll get rid of the ‘Hoe and get a FS crew cab PU, most likely another GMC, because having owned one I find them much more useful than an SUV.

        The ‘Hoe gets driven on weekends and almost always has something hooked to the back of it. Round trip is never less than 300 miles and not much for charging stations in rural MN or WI. Last time I drove it was 2 weeks ago. Put 320 miles on it in a day towing a 3000 pound boat. Drove home with the lights and heat on. Will be making the exact same trip this weekend. 400 – 500 miles of range won’t cut it towing in cold weather with the heat on for 5-6 hours.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          Just so you know, there are more Tesla Superchargers in those two states than you might believe, though I acknowledge they may not be near the route you personally take. They appear to be about 80 miles apart according to their maps ( https://www.tesla.com/findus?bounds=51.67787708995455%2C-72.89531624530127%2C38.760775654886935%2C-104.28691959594062&zoom=6&filters=supercharger ) so the issue may not be as bad as you think.

          I will note that my typical routes from Delaware to Tennessee and Florida are significantly more dense with Superchargers, so such a run for me, especially since I use expressways for long-distance driving, would be no more difficult than they already are with my ICEs. And the Tesla, at least, will tell you where the nearest charging is and how to get there.

          Not trying to convince you to buy a Tesla, mind you; only pointing out that much of what you believe is based on hearsay and you should do your own research when the time comes. Too many people claim a BEV cannot do what the Teslas already do.

  • avatar
    Luke42

    The word “cyber” grates on my nerves, too…

    It has a history of being used to describe IT — but mostly by people who have no about IT.

    Ted Stevens would have used the word “cyber” to describe what Linus Torvalds does. Linus Torvalds, not so much.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    Anyone watch The FasT Lane Car try to take a trip in a garbage Model X from Colorado to Oregon?

    That’s all you need to know about how big of a joke EVs are when it comes to just about anything.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yjklex38lkQ

    An electric Ford or Tesla pickup? Complete garbage.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Vulpine: Just so you know, there are more Tesla Superchargers in those two states than you might believe, though I...
  • danio3834: It makes sense in that it’s a popular platform that actually has a hope in hell in recouping cost....
  • FreedMike: I think China figured out “industrial processes” a long time ago, and I don’t think...
  • danio3834: They lost money, plain and simple. It shows what it takes to make a “good” compact car, the...
  • tankinbeans: Just lop off the backseats already. I don’t know of a single human, save maybe my three year old...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States