By on July 31, 2019

autonomous hardware

With automakers investing heavily into the development of electrified and autonomous vehicles, it might seem there is a gigantic consumer base ready and raring to go out and buy them. But every study we’ve encountered suggests the exact opposite. Electric cars are still limited to tech fetishists with regular folks occasionally deciding to become early adopters. Meanwhile, AVs are still in their infancy with engineers keen to document every baby step they take as the public remains ill-informed on their overall status.

It was presumed, however, that this would change as development progressed and “mobility” became more mainstream. But a new study from J.D. Power, backed by Survey Monkey, has showed — once again — this is not yet the case. Based on a 100-point scale, the duo’s 2019 Mobility Confidence Index yielded a score of 36 for self-driving vehicles and 55 for battery-electric vehicles. 

“Out of the box, these scores are not encouraging,” said Kristin Kolodge, Executive Director, Driver Interaction and Human Machine Interface Research at J.D. Power. “As automakers head down the developmental road to self-driving vehicles and greater electrification, it’s important to know if consumers are on the same road — and headed in the same direction. That doesn’t seem to be the case right now. Manufacturers need to learn where consumers are in terms of comprehending and accepting new mobility technologies — and what needs to be done.”

A change in rhetoric would be nice. We know automakers are eager to convert vehicles into mobility devices that mimic our phones and tap into our personal data, but that may not be an ideal scenario for the average consumer. We’d argue that there’s significant portion of car buyers that don’t want this technology at all, with a bunch more too uniformed to have a strong opinion. In fact, the study confirmed our suspicions — showing 66 percent of respondents admitting to having little to no knowledge about self-driving vehicles. 36 percent claimed to have no interest in them whatsoever, regardless of application. 11 percent, claimed to be “extremely likely” to purchase or lease one when the time came but most of those respondents also claimed to have a great deal of understanding of the technology.

Aware that knowledge is selling power, the industry has attempted to accelerate the promotion of self-driving technologies to “build understanding, trust and acceptance.” Unfortunately for automakers, the marketing used to hype these technologies is frequently loaded with unpalatable corporate speak and broken promises. It’s all kind of dreary and unsatisfying, often conjuring visions of a sterile and sedated world.

The survey also showed a cavalcade of safety concerns surrounding autonomous cars. Ironically, safety is the number one talking point automakers use when promoting the technology. But 71 percent of respondents expressed fears that the car’s systems would fail and place them in danger. Meanwhile, 57 percent were concerned with malicious hacking and 55 percent fretted over the questionable legal liability of self-driving collisions. Over a third of consumers also bemoaned having to give up control of their automobile, with nearly as many saying they didn’t think autonomous cars would be any fun.

The positive attributes presumed to accompany autonomous vehicles garnered lighter support overall. The most popular presumed advantage, allowing disabled persons the ability to drive (which is not a guarantee), was approved by 47 percent of the surveyed group. Improved safety, reduced stress, the ability to do other activities while in transit all averaged between 31 and 37 percent.

Another interesting metric was traffic congestion. 21 percent of respondents claimed self-driving vehicles would reduce congestion while 17 believed they would worsen it. That largely depends on how AVs are implemented but we already now that Uber/Lyft vehicles with no passengers have helped to clog up city streets. If executed irresponsibly, AVs could be just as bad. Then again, the constant monitoring of their whereabouts could eventually streamline commutes if the infrastructure was setup to cater to them. But that’s highly speculative and assumes everything goes perfectly.

The electric vehicle index was a bit brighter. 61 percent of surveyed individuals believe that EVs were better for the environment but only 39 percent said they’d actually seriously consider buying/leasing one as their next car. The biggest negative was the charging infrastructure (64 percent) with range anxiety (59 percent) being a close second. Price was also a concern, with the vast majority (78 percent) suggesting that tax credits would absolutely factor into their purchasing decisions.

None of this bodes well for the industry. Automakers are really breaking the bank to swap over to electrification and, while the reasons are understandable (environmental regulation, the drive to be cutting edge, capturing a new market, etc) the audience needs to grow for it to become profitable. As for autonomous vehicles, consumers are in for a rude awakening. Perhaps misled by the media or the industry itself, most are of the mind that they’ll be available for purchase in under 10 years. Those in the know are aware that the reality will likely be much further out with delivery and taxi services arriving first. However, that’s not likely to matter much if the majority of consumers are still too terrified to actually ride in them.

 

[Image: Ford Motor Co.]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

68 Comments on “Another Study Shows Consumers Hesitant to Embrace Mobility...”


  • avatar
    MBella

    Customers that have the current crop of assist systems, also likely are starting to see how extremely limited these systems are. The cameras can be easily blinded. The radar and laser sensors easily contaminated, false alerts. We are a long way away.

    • 0 avatar
      TimK

      I had a rental 2019 Nissan Rouge last week. It was equipped with a set of cameras and sensors that implemented what I called the “lane nanny”. It apparently looked at lane markers, other vehicles and my steering inputs and decided if I needed help. Constant beeps, yodels and blinkin’ lights made for an interesting ride. The system’s active steering and brake assists can be disabled, but the sound and light alarms are always on. At one point a sensor they called “sonar” put up a dire warning that I was about to back over an obstacle. The “obstacle” was just some spilled coffee, a wet spot, on the asphalt. Yeah, it gave me real confidence in trusting the rest of the gizmos.

      • 0 avatar
        thejohnnycanuck

        We are a week into ownership of a new Corolla Hatch and it beeps every time you go over lane markings. However if you’re overtaking on a two lane stretch of highway and you signal beforehand it won’t beep.

        I hate a car that promotes good driving habits.

      • 0 avatar

        I have enough warnings, alarms and distractions when my wife sits next to me in the passenger seat. So no, thank you, I already have much more advanced nanny in the passenger seat and do not need another one more prone to false alarm. My wife also is prone to false alarms and we are talking here about advanced AI.

    • 0 avatar
      dwford

      Heck, my 2017 Chevy Cruze can’t even keep track of whether the key fob is in the car or not, and has lost contact with the tie pressure sensors on multiple occasions. I have zero trust in these AV systems so far.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      People would rather die from their own mistake than from computer error

  • avatar
    dal20402

    I was also too optimistic about AVs, but EVs are going to be mainstream before we know it. First, other countries — including some markets more important than our own — are pulling out all the stops. Second, even within the US, it’s just a matter of time before places like LA and Phoenix with chronically poor air quality start to phase out ICE vehicles in most applications, or to tax them heavily. Third, in space-limited places like the big East Coast cities, SF, and Seattle, non-car EVs like ebikes and scooters are going to become more attractive than gridlocked cars for a lot of short-distance travelers. All of this will make charging infrastructure an attractive investment for utilities and even some dedicated companies. New houses and apartment garages are already coming prewired for EV chargers, and the trend will continue.

    • 0 avatar

      Electric vehicles will still only account for less the 5% of the market.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        I think EV market share will be half or so in the largest metros, translating to about a quarter nationally, in a decade or so. The transition will be driven by local and state rules, motivated by a combination of air quality and carbon goals. (At this point, in places like LA, nearly all of the remaining smog derives from cars and trucks.)

        Day-use fleets of both small and large vehicles will transition to all-EV. Two-car households will have at least one EV (our 1x EV/1x hybrid fleet works great). The main holdouts will be megacommuters and people who have no place to charge.

        Once people realize how nicely EVs drive, how convenient at-home charging is, and how rare range anxiety is when you start with a full battery every day, attitudes will change.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          25% of the new vehicles sold or 25% of the entire fleet?

          I don’t anticipate “heavy taxes” that impact low income drivers going over well. It is going to take a decent carrot (bigger subsidies) to make the stick worth it. The economy will also need to be sustainably strong for people to swap out of their current vehicles.

          I still think it is going to take a non-holistic tech advancement to move BEVs beyond a niche.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            New vehicles sold. But I also think air quality concerns will drive slowly increasing registration/property taxes on existing ICE cars. The more we learn about ICE vehicle exhaust, the more trouble even “clean cars” seem to cause. EVs don’t address all of that — they still have particulate emissions from tires and to a degree from brakes — but they cut localized air quality impact dramatically.

            You already see policy moving this way in other places in both Europe and Asia with chronic air quality problems.

    • 0 avatar
      thornmark

      the opposite

      EV’s are a media pushed idea

      w/o crazy government subsidies EV’s fall flat

      reminds me of year 2000 computer crash hype

      and btw, Edison had your prediction in like 1910

      I think the autoextremist guy had a column or two on this

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        I know a few people in my area who bought an BEV, and a few that own a Hybrid Prius.

        While the Prius is used pretty much as the main grocery-getter for those owners, the BEVs are rarely used (if ever) once the novelty and the “show-off” factor had worn off for those owners.

        But they also have one or more ICE vehicles to drive around in.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          We have a Bolt EV and a Highlander Hybrid.

          The Bolt EV is used for at least 80% of our household car trips.

          The Highlander is used mostly for long drives and when we need to carry things too big to fit in the Bolt.

          • 0 avatar
            MBella

            There’s some completely usable EVs nowadays, and they work well in two car families like you mentioned. What’s being ignored is where we’re going to get ball the lithium to build the batteries, and where we get the electricity, especially since NIMBYs don’t want nuclear plants, and now there’s a big push by eco hacks to eliminate hydro electric dams.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            The rare earth issue is an issue, but it won’t scale linearly with the cumulative number of electric cars sold, because we’ll be recycling increasing numbers of old batteries.

            Total supply of electricity can be worked out, especially because EVs will mostly be charging at times when demand is currently slack.

    • 0 avatar
      civicjohn

      @dal, I live outside of Nashville. You mention scooters as a short distance traveling option. Yesterday, I saw 2 scooters run a red light, no helmet, and the best one was a boyfriend behind his girlfriend on a scooter, no helmets, blowing past a yellow traffic light. Some councilmen in the city of Nashville have tried to get rid of them, we’ve had several deaths from scooters, but the mayor seems unable to stop the ridiculousness. Of course, the last mayor was run out of town because of an affair with her security detail, and the only Blue county in the state is Nashville. Now, we’ve essentially decided that Nashville should be a sanctuary city and I’m sure that we’ll have homeless camps in the city. It’s a logical progression. All of our wonderful bike lanes reduced the lanes for things like, well, cars.

      You can bloviate all you want about the EV tsunami, bring it. But the parking doesn’t exist, the charging stations don’t exist, yet we’re supposed to believe this is going to be a seamless transition?

    • 0 avatar
      FordMan_48126

      @dal20402

      Electricity demand, especially in large metro areas you see it being the most practical application (and actually, most people agree this is the correct areas EV’s should be focused) will be the thing that will prevent 25% of new vehicles sold in the USA to being electricity demands

      From the website of the US Energy Information Administration:
      “In 2018, about 4,178 billion kilowatthours (kWh) (or 4.18 trillion kWh) of electricity were generated at utility-scale electricity generation facilities in the United States. About 63% of this electricity generation was from fossil fuels (coal, natural gas, petroleum, and other gases)”.
      From the same website:
      “Electricity trade between the United States and Canada benefits both countries. … During 2014, 60 companies in Canada exported 58.4 terawatthours (TWh) of electricity into the United States, making up 1.6% of U.S. electricity retail sales and 10% of Canadian electricity generation”

      In short, the USA already does not produce enough of it’s own electricity, never mind dramatically increasing the demand. It has not been an issue up to now due to the relatively flat demand for electricity, due to increased conservation as well as the long term effects of the 2008 recession. In addition, 63% of electricity in this country is produced by non-renewable sources, mostly oil, natural gas & coal.

      Unless there is a major change in either policy or people’s attitudes towards nuclear power, I don’t see how the current electrical infrastructure can support that many EV’s on the grid, no matter what time of day. Yet it seems no one seems to be talking about this issue with respect to EV’s

      • 0 avatar
        HotPotato

        Depends where you live, FordMan. Following the Enron debacle, California vowed never to be held hostage by the spot power market again, and approved power plant construction left and right. Now there’s such a surplus of natural gas generation in the state that some plants are at like 10% capacity. Locals are finally starting to rebel and block new natgas plants in their back yards, and the state’s nuke plants are aging out one by one, but for now there’s plenty of juice regardless (and more solar and wind capacity added all the time).

    • 0 avatar

      OTOH,California power companies are warning customers that power can be shut off if certain dry weather conditions are met,usually in the summer. Kinda hard to charge an ev if your power is shut off to keep the power company from being blamed for forest fires.

      • 0 avatar
        indi500fan

        No problemo, just cruise down to the local Muskcharger and fill up on solar juice. Or be like the guy converting the tapped out 3000 dollar Nissan Leafs with bolt-on solar panels all over the outer skin. 10 miles of range to get you back home from work after charging all day in the sun.

  • avatar
    thejohnnycanuck

    The current state of AV tech reminds me of owning a boat. Every so often you fill a wheelbarrow full of cash, push it down to the dock and start shovelling money at it.

    I hope the OEMs take notice of these studies. If the majority of their customer bases could care less then who is it exactly they’re doing this for?

  • avatar

    Wall Street in search of the next big thing has aggressively promoted autonomous technology. The truth is it will fade away like most overhyped ideas.

  • avatar
    Mackie

    Cars that can be trusted to truly and safely drive themselves are a very long way off. I, for one, never wanted this kind of tech. It feels like an answer to a question nobody asked. Why are all car makers so eager to shove this sketchy tech down our throats?

    • 0 avatar
      Tele Vision

      @ Mackie

      Simple. The reason is ‘content’. Ever wonder why Google and Apple wanted to develop cars? They, and now all automakers, with the looming 5G connectivity, want you consuming – and generating – content when you’re in a car. Same as in a cab or on a train or bus. You make them money whilst Internetting on your phone.

      ‘Cold, dead hands’ and so forth, but I own 19 Litres of displacement with no CarPlay extant. The only thing that might change is upping that displacement figure with a 1960’s hot rod for the Herself and, perhaps, an NA Miata for myself.

  • avatar
    JoeBrick

    I personally LOVE mobility ! The freedom to get in my car/truck and go wherever I want on whatever schedule I choose, making impromptu stops here and there and returning whenever I choose, it’s wonderful !
    Mobility as a word used in their context, NOT SO MUCH. Heavy emphasis on the F#CK NO !

  • avatar
    TimK

    Yes, it’s hard to understand given all the examples of autonomous taxis, semis, and garbage trucks plying the roadways just like those visionaries predicted. Waymo has tens of thousands of driverless Pacifica vans roaming all over the Phoenix metro area, proving how a bit of courage and a NVIDIA mobo can drag the rest of us luddites into the Future.

    Reality: Only a handful of AVs are on the roads, the software and hardware are demonstrably unsafe, and the legal frameworks for liability and accountability are not in place at any governmental level. The whole thing is yet another SillyCon Valley hype fest played to the hilt by dozens of companies.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    “The electric vehicle index was a bit brighter. 61 percent of surveyed individuals believe that EVs were better for the environment but only 39 percent said they’d actually seriously consider buying/leasing one as their next car. The biggest negative was the charging infrastructure (64 percent) with range anxiety (59 percent) being a close second. Price was also a concern, with the vast majority (78 percent) suggesting that tax credits would absolutely factor into their purchasing decisions.”

    39% BS; it’s more like 5% or less. I’d argue that 39% think someone *else* should consider an EV for their next car.

    The charging infrastructure response indicates consumer misinformation, for which I blame the mfrs, as well as a lack of a universal charging protocol.

    Range anxiety is real, but it doesn’t actually happen with a long-range car. Heck, it’s only happened to me once with my 124-mile Ioniq in 9 months. But it happened to me a lot with my not-73-mile Leaf 1.0.

    Tax credits were the tipping point for both of my EV purchases – can’t deny it. It will be good once they go away.

    I’d add another factor – EV depreciation, which is very bad for most EVs except Teslas. This is directly related to battery degradation. Early Leafs were Exhibit A for this problem. Maybe Bolts are better.

    As for “mobility” – you can keep it.

    • 0 avatar
      SPPPP

      “The charging infrastructure response indicates consumer misinformation, for which I blame the mfrs, as well as a lack of a universal charging protocol.”

      I am not so sure. A lot of young people rent, and don’t have a place to charge an electric. Many can’t afford to buy a house because of limited supply and low interest rates driving up housing costs. Many houses are owned by relatively wealthy older people who don’t plan to move into a group home. These older people may or may not be interested in an electric. If they are interested, there is still the problem of old housing stock with old wiring that may not support a charge station.

      From my (limited) research, it seems that “free” charging around town is almost non-existent in a lot of the built-up Northeast. From what I see, there are a few EV charging spots here and there, most associated with parking garages or retail businesses. There are a very few Tesla Supercharger stations around, and most are associated with hotels or other businesses that expect you to spend money there before you can use the charger. Most offices don’t offer any kind of charging station.

      So I would say that looking at EVs specifically for the easiest use case of a daily commute, about 30% of potential customers don’t have the required infrastructure to buy an EV. When filtering out the older people that don’t even want an EV, I would say that maybe 45% of the people that might want an EV don’t have the required infrastructure.

      When you start considering the harder use cases of road trips, I could see the percentage of people concerned about infrastructure easily reaching around 60%.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        @SPPP: In the Boston area, there’s plenty of free level 2 or minimal charge stations. There are Tesla Superchargers around, but none of them are associated with businesses that expect you to spend money. An apartment without charging can make it difficult, but if you have something like a Model 3, just hit a Supercharger for a 30-minute charge once or twice a week. then again, if you can afford a Model 3, you probably aren’t living in an apartment. Someday, someone will figure out that a fast/super-charger combined with a laundromat would be a great combination. Do your laundry and charge at the same time.

        • 0 avatar
          TimK

          Our small residential community of 125 homes looked at putting in a public EV charger mainly because a new Tesla owner requested it, and the Sustainability Committee (largely clueless, retired .edus) thought it sounded like a good idea. The Future and all that. RFQs went out and installation estimates were $75K to $300K.

          Nope — not affordable in this universe.

          • 0 avatar
            indi500fan

            I’m trying to get the grandson’s high school to put some chargers in so I can get him a tapped out Leaf for commuting. What could signal more virtue than free juice “for the children” ?

          • 0 avatar
            HotPotato

            I’m thinking either they requested a quote for DC fast charging / Tesla supercharging — which literally nobody needs at their house — or you’re making stuff up.

            Chargepoint gives Level 2 public charging stations FREE to condo associations. You run the electric, they supply and install the charging station. The association can then charge people to use them by paying Chargepoint a monthly service fee of like $30 (users swipe their Chargepoint fob or use the app to pay).

            $300k my azz.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      @SCE: Here’s a paragraph left out by TTAC:

      Experience affects purchase consideration: Two-thirds (68%) of consumers say they have no experience with battery-electric vehicles, meaning they have never been in one. Among those who have owned or leased a battery-electric vehicle, 75% say they would consider repurchasing a similar vehicle. Among those who have never been in a battery-electric vehicle, only 40% said they would consider purchasing or leasing one. Universally, 78% say that tax subsidies or credits would factor into their purchase decision.

      Here’s a link to the full “non-curated” article:

      https://www.jdpower.com/business/press-releases/2019-mobility-confidence-index-study-fueled-surveymonkey-audience

      • 0 avatar

        mcs,
        So 1 out of 4 EV users wouldn’t even “consider” getting another one?
        And the other 3 would consider getting another-not that they would actually get one,just that they would consider it.
        Hardly a ringing endorsement of EVs.

        • 0 avatar
          SCE to AUX

          If their first EV was a Leaf 1.0 like I had, and they saw their gas gauge lie daily, and their battery degrade 5% per year, and their car’s value depreciate by 75% in 3 years, and Nissan ignored their complaints, then I can see why they’d not even consider another EV.

          YMMV, as with mcs here.

          Honestly, the same question asked of truck owners might yield the same results.

  • avatar
    aja8888

    The next big recession in this country and the world (coming soon!) will put a lot of this overhyped and overpriced electric and autonomous stuff under the rug.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      “The next big recession in this country and the world (coming soon!) ”

      Yes, I agree, but I also see this as an opportunity for the rest of us to get our financial ducks in line to weather the next global recession.

      People who already have money won’t be fazed by a recession.

      EVs, autonomous mobility, etc, won’t catch on until this planet runs out of oil. Until then dino-fuel will rule. Even in hard financial times, times of recession, and times of depression.

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    “The biggest negative was the charging infrastructure (64 percent) with range anxiety (59 percent) being a close second. ”

    The whole beauty of an EV is you charge at home. A charging infrastructure is not necessary. People who haven’t spent time with an EV just can’t wrap their heads around this. Last weekend I put gas in my Tahoe while in tow and getting up to a pump was a major pain. I spent more time dicking around getting that thing filled with then I’ll spend fueling up my Volt for the next two months. And that gets driven every day.

    For my DD I’ll never go back to ICE. The smooth, effortless torque of electric drive is addictive. Run it in sport mode my Volt is way more fun to drive than any 4 banger ICE car in its class. I drove the GF’s Mazda 3 with a stick the other day and 2 miles down the road was wishing I was in the Volt. I’m sure for what it is, it’s a decent car, but compared to my Chevy Volt…….a huge step down and backwards! It just felt so crude and unrefined and it’s 3 years newer with less than half the miles.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      “The whole beauty of an EV is you charge at home. A charging infrastructure is not necessary. People who haven’t spent time with an EV just can’t wrap their heads around this.”

      For people with garages or driveways, this is exactly right, and it really is amazing how much it baffles people. I’ve had the following conversation at least 10 times since buying our Bolt:

      “How long does it take to charge?”
      “About five hours if it’s empty, but it’s almost never close to empty, so usually an hour or two.”
      “Where can you wait that long?”
      “I charge at home, overnight, so it’s always full in the morning.”
      “You charge AT HOME? How much did it cost to install a charger?”
      “About $500 for the charger and $300 for the electrician to install the outlet. But that’s only so I can charge faster. It will also charge slowly from a regular outlet.”
      At this point their minds are blown. They think of a charger as something like a gas pump, that’s a giant piece of commercial infrastructure you have to go somewhere to use.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        And of course those “chargers” aren’t really chargers at all, that is part of the car and the EVSE is really just a smart cord with a place to hang the plug.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “A charging infrastructure is not necessary.”

      I disagree. What if you’re taking a trip and don’t have a Tahoe for a backup? “Take a rental car”, “take a plane”, or “use the existing EV infrastructure” are only good answers when EVs make up a very small market share. The number of people traveling by car over 300 mile during the holidays would be overwhelming to our current rental and air fleets as well as the available chargers.

      I’m not saying there needs to be a charging station on every street corner but I do think having level 3 charging hubs throughout the country (about as numerous as highway rest stops) for longer distance travel would be a major help for EV adoption.

      The other option are PHEVs like your Volt. You get to stay on nearly 100% battery power for daily commuting and have the ICE engine for distance. I personally like the PHEV option, but you do lose the simplicity benefits of a full BEV.

      • 0 avatar
        Wheatridger

        Lack of simplicity beats lack of needed content and features, unless you’re buiilding a true sports car. I happen to think two powerplants are better than one. The ICE and EV systems complement each other perfectly, sharing the task. I can use EV on crowded streets, and go hybrid when I need range or performance (8 sec. 0-60, anyone?).

        Working together, the loads of each propulsion system are optimized. The ICE doesn’t have to be used on short trips from a cold start. The battery doesn’t have to be so huge and heavy as an EVs, because you can always get home on gas. I expect better long-term durability from this kind of lightly stressed system, and so far, owners’ reports and websites are confirming this.

      • 0 avatar
        indi500fan

        After seeing the pics of long lines at the Muskchargers at the holidays, peeps need to budget plenty of time to get to grandma’s.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        “I disagree. What if you’re taking a trip and don’t have a Tahoe for a backup?”

        Good point….I should clarify that I see EV’s only as a 2nd or 3rd vehicle. IMHO battery technology just isn’t where it needs to be for them to completely replace ICE vehicles. As a 2nd or 3rd vehicle in a multi-car household they are pretty much a no-brainer if you pick one up used. I picked the Volt up for dirt as a lease return. Once battery costs come down they’ll make sense as new vehicles as well.

        “I personally like the PHEV option, but you do lose the simplicity benefits of a full BEV.”

        Agree and owning the Volt for a little over 3 years has convinced me to just go with a full-on BEV next.

  • avatar
    labelnerd

    As I’ve said many many times, until the average electric vehicle costs and performs similar to a standard Internal combustion engine, I will never buy one. The current target they have to hit is a Kia Stinger, so it probably won’t be in my lifetime (another 30-40 years if lucky).

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Tesla actually occasionally offers a Model 3 that is really close to the Stinger. It’s RWD, uses the 75kWH battery, does 0-60 in 4.7, has a 325 mile range, and was listed at $43K. It is usually called the “RWD Long-Range” or something like that.

      Unfortunately, like the McRib sandwich, this version seems to only be offered for very limited times. Plus, when it is offered Tesla doesn’t even put it on their website, requiring a phone call (WTF) or a showroom visit to order one.

  • avatar
    Wheatridger

    Personally, I’m not bullish on EVs. I sometimes make long drives out into the country, where chargers simply aren’t available. Fast charging is rough on battery life, so I don’t see this issue resolved soon. I’ll just have to be satisfied with my plug-in hybrid. It makes every local trip on EV, and yields high-40s mpg on the highway, for 65 mpg overall. Versatility and availability beats future perfection.

    As for automated driving, I hope I don’t live to see it widespread. The transition would be especially difficult, as old and new cars are mixed. Just look at the trouble and delay with implementing PTC, a centralized system to control train movements. Freight trains don’t move fast; they don’t need constant steering; they all are of similar size and tech; they are few and far between. Highway traffic is just the opposite, and presents a much tougher problem.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    I have been driving more for pleasure lately – different states, large cities, small towns, wide variety of roads. The U.S. road system is not *close* to standardized from the perspective of any autonomous driving system. (Even with something as ‘basic’ as lane markings.)

    In one day I counted four times when any autonomous system I can imagine would have had problems interpreting the conditions and situation and choosing an appropriate action.

    Every time I see an autocorrect spelling ‘error’ in the TTAC comments, I pretend that a theoretical autonomous driving system just had a collision.

    I run across a surprising number of very nice EV charger installations.

  • avatar
    FordMan_48126

    As someone whom has worked for over 25 years at one of the Detroit Big three, I can tell everyone here that much of the recent down sizing at them has to do exactly with this subject. All of them are spending huge amounts of money on a business model that as of yet as added less than zero to each company’s bottom lines. Yet due to inaction by the US Government and the constant ‘whispering’ in the ears of the C-suite folks by the $1,000/hr consultants, they are afraid to stop the spending for fear of being caught behind.

    ON a personal note, I make my personal decisions based on usage and budget – and currently and the foreseeable future, AV and electric vehicles fail me in both these areas. I suspect for many, the same situation applies. In addition, I also suspect that the reason for the low confidence and favorably perceptions have to do with the nagging feeling that we are being told we have to do this (i.e. adopt electrics and AV technology). It seems that more and more people seem to be rebelling on being told what to do rather than feel free to make their own decisions.

  • avatar
    Detroit-X

    Let’s just say something crazy, like the stock market price inflating gimmicks in the cars sort-of work, and let’s go on with the crazy saying people sort-of buy them. So now, we are at can the dealers fix them? Answer. Heck no! (This prediction based on many years of seeing dealers not fix much less complicated things.) Overpaid, under-skilled, CEO clowns simply don’t care how many lives they ruin on this through layoffs and crashes.

    • 0 avatar
      HotPotato

      Sh!tty dealer service departments are another argument for Tesla’s vertically integrated model. Every tech is factory trained, and they can come to you. I know they’re over-stretched at the moment, but I do think it’s a better model for servicing complicated machines.

      • 0 avatar
        Detroit-X

        But if the factory (manufacturer) is an idiot…
        But if the techs are not created, valued, and retained…
        But if the factory only worries about their stock price…
        etc.

  • avatar

    While Hackett foolishly tries to turn Ford into google, the stock price is heading south of 10 USD. When Fields was in charge thing were not this bad.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • FreedMike: I think you’re wrong, dal – even people who aren’t picky about performance can like or...
  • gtem: Really? I thought that for the era, the Accord Coupe’s NSX/alfa inspired rear end treatment was really...
  • roloboto: I ve a lot in B.C mountain passes so things can get pretty gnarly, pretty wuick. I have…. First aid...
  • ToddAtlasF1: “My faith in humanity is restored,” said Musk, who also called diver Vernon Unsworth a “child rapist”...
  • gtem: Yeah this guy is full of it. At the time, the Accord’s 200hp 3.0L was right up there with much pricier...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States