By on December 19, 2018

As the media obsessively focuses on the upcoming, mid-engined C8 Corvette, the C7 languishes. Vette sales exploded in 2014 following the release of the seventh-generation model, declining ever since. Chevrolet only sold 25,079 Corvettes domestically in 2017 and, even though year-end sales aren’t yet in, General Motors looks ready to fall short of last year’s volume for 2018.

While it is not abnormal to see the popularity of a high-profile sports car wane in the years following a debut, it’s slightly less common to see an automaker increase its price without adding some new hardware — and that’s what General Motors is doing with the Corvette in 2019. 

How much more you’ll be paying depends entirely upon which C7 you’re in the market for. According to Corvette Blogger, Grand Sport models and below will tack on an additional $405 ($905 for convertibles), while the Z06 adds an additional $1,000 on top of that. For the ZR1, consumers are looking at a $2,000 price increase for the hardtop and $2,500 for the convertible — resulting in an MSRP of $125,400.

Opting for the eight-speed automatic also results in a small price increase for 2019. Formerly $1,725, the transmission will now cost $1,995. You’ll also want to account for GM’s $1,095 destination fee and the gas guzzler tax applicable to the Z06 and ZR1.

Fortunately, the new prices only affect cars invoiced from this point on. Corvettes currently relaxing in showrooms will not be subject to the price increase. But the same can not be said for the next vehicle that rolls off a car carrier and onto a dealer lot.

Our best guess is that General Motors assumes dealers can sell discounted C7s for more after the mid-engine Corvette hits showrooms. We also suppose a grand or two isn’t going to change the minds of most prospective buyers, who probably view the model as a relative performance bargain, anyway.

Chalk it up to inflation if it makes you feel any better. Of course, it likely won’t — unless you’ve one of the precious few Americans who actually received a raise or meaningful holiday bonus this year.

[Image: General Motors]

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13 Comments on “Corvettes Are Getting More Expensive Just in Time for the Holidays...”


  • avatar
    schmitt trigger

    A decision which does not make rational sense?

    Welcome to GM groupthink!

  • avatar

    The CT6 and Corvette are the only truly world-class vehicles in GM’s lineup. Unfortunately, the CT6 is headed for the extinction leaving the Corvette as GM’s only elite vehicle.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    Last November when GM had its 20% off SS sedan sale I compared the price between the discounted Holden and the then current discounts on the Corvette. The SS were going for around $38-41k and the Vette was within a couple grand. Many in the $42k range.

    The C8 is a beyond boneheaded move that further convinces me of GMs incompetence. Say goodbye to the affordable Vette, not to mention destroying the nameplate in a similar manner to the Blazer.

    Sure give us a midengine sportscar but don’t destroy the Vette which has acrued a legacy over 7 generations and countless decades as an affordable front engine rear drive sportscar.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      What dealer has new Corvettes for $42K advertised?

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        It was on cars.com in Nov ’17 but I’m sure it included the senior buyer, new to the brand, new driver, loyal customer cash back discounts.

        I’m sure they’re still doing similar deals depending on the specials of the month.

        • 0 avatar
          TheAnswerIsPolara

          cheapest near me is ~53K. Looks like they’ll continue to be just out of reach.

          I should be happy about that based on my experience with my last two Pontiacs.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            You can find monthly specials on GMs website, the only specials this month is low lease offers on the Vette, depending on the time of the year you can get 10k off, same for trucks.

  • avatar
    SaulTigh

    The current Corvette is awesome, and particularly compelling in base Stingray trim.

    Biggest problem with buying them? They’re sold by Chevy dealers, all of whom seem to be much more interested in selling some SUV blob to subprime buyers, or pickup trucks. Ford dealer experience isn’t much better, but I come out pissed off every time I try dropping in on a Chevy dealer.

    • 0 avatar
      lwest

      I agree.

      Horrible experinces with Chevy dealerships. Didn’t seem interested or even know what they had in stock.

      Porsche deler much happier to see me and work with me.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      This…and it’s true of Dodge dealers as well.

      When I bought my Jetta in late ’16, I shopped a Cruze and a Dart. The sales staff at the Chevy and Dodge stores I went to looked at me like I had a third eye sticking out of my forehead or something. The Dodge guy actually said something to the effect that little cars were for gay guys and highly suggested I buy a RAAAAMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM Rebel. Okey dokey.

      In retrospect, questioning my interest in the ladies aside, can I blame them for trying to push trucks on me? Not really. If these guys were being paid on commission, they’d probably make a “mini” on the compact car sale, but could actually make enough on the truck to pay their baby mama that month. Gotta have priorities, y’know.


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