By on September 28, 2018

Image: Toyota

The current crop of Toyota pickups are good, solid machines. This is proven by their continued sales performance, particularly the Tacoma and 4Runner. Their half-ton is behind the eight ball in terms of powertrain and interior gadgetry but continues to appeal to certain customers and enjoys healthy loyalty numbers.

Hard points are expensive propositions with which to tinker, which is why it makes sense that the Texas-based arm of Toyota is applying some paint & wallpaper to three of its offerings for 2019, including one model that can apparently do no wrong.

The 4Runner, despite being older than that half bottle of ketchup in the back of your fridge, remain popular with customers shopping that segment for a new rig. Its lantern-jawed appearance has a lot to do with this, in your author’s humble opinion. The prospect of sky-high resale values surely doesn’t hurt either, given that used examples are trading for big money, not unlike its FJ Cruiser brother.

Stoking the fires, Toyota is offering a Nightshade Edition on the 4Runner for 2019, adding blacked-out trim and a set of 20-inch wheels. Black chrome on the grille announces your buying decision to other commuters. Available only on high-zoot Limited trim, the Nightshade is available in 4×2 or 4×4 models and carries a price of $1,740.

Image: Toyota

Given its popularity, the 4Runner didn’t really need this extra option package, but it will definitely do something to warm the hearts of all hands in the Toyota accounting department: Bring the truck’s average transaction price up a bit.

Speaking of trucks, pickups are a segment forecasted to grow in volume over the next few years in spite of a potential decline in overall auto sales. Toyota’s mid-size offering, the Tacoma, continues to sell well. This explains why the company is resisting shovelling too much money into a revamp; after all, why spend the R&D dollars for an incremental jump in volume? Nissan undoubtedly feels the same about its Frontier.

Image: Toyota

Still, new trims are always welcome, which is why Toyota introduced the Tacoma SX yesterday at the State Fair of Texas. Here, the new suffix denotes a blacked-out theme, one which tints the badges, mirror caps, grille, and a few other items for a reasonable $560. Those are 16-inch alloys you see in the pictures. Smartly, Toyota is making this available on a variety of colors, not just black and white. The SX Package is based on the Tacoma SR grade and is available on 4×2 and 4×4 Access Cab models.

Image: Toyota

That leaves the Tundra. Here’s a fun fact for your Friday afternoon: the Tundra came within 12,000 units of the Sierra in 2007. The gap is, um, more than that today. For the upcoming model year, the half-ton also gets SXified, except here it is a color-keyed package rather than a blackout trim. Badges are shaved, grille surrounds and bumper trims are body color, and black 18-inch wheels are added. Available on the SR5 grade Double Cab in 4×2 or 4×4, this trim adds $1,630 to a Tundra’s note. Look for it in white, black, and Barcelona Red.

Those in the know opine that the Tundra won’t see any major revisions until 2022, at which time we’ll be looking at refreshes of the Ram and GM that appeared this year.

[Images: Toyota]

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74 Comments on “Old Dogs, New Tricks: Appearance Packages Keep the Truck Fires Burning at Toyota...”


  • avatar
    FreedMike

    My girlfriend’s kid is an aspiring farmer, and needs something to haul stuff around in. On a whim, I checked out a Tacoma.

    Thirty-two grand. With steel wheels. Oy.

    I know it’s durable…but wow. And used ones aren’t much cheaper.

    (If someone has a suggestion for a cheap used truck, let me know…30 large is way out of the kid’s ballpark.)

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      There are guys literally buying it just for the resale value, I need a small truck and I’ll just buy the one with the best resale.

      In 2006 I bought a 2004 F150 V8 standard cab long bed 2wd for less than $12K.

      Tacomas at that price had 100,000 plus miles on them.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Buying a vehicle for resale is a sucker bet, but I have a feeling that if that’s your goal, a Tacoma would be the way to go, unless you’re buying something like a Demon and putting it in storage.

    • 0 avatar
      R Henry

      My neighbor just sold his not rusty 1985 F150 work truck. Only 76,000 original miles–4.9L straight six and 4-speed manual. A Mexican landscaper paid $2250.00 for it. That hombre got the deal of the century!

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      So how big is his ballpark? Between the discounting and the PCOs floating around it should be no trouble to get into a stripper F150 for under 20 for taxes.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      Just buy any older rust free domestic half ton in good mechanical shape, the $20k+ saved versus buying new will give a nice fat cushion to either put into other farm expenses or throw in a reman transmission or rebuild the front end or whatever else comes up for relatively not much money.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        Pricey but loved Dakota:
        denver.craigslist.org/cto/d/1994-dodge-dakota-143k-4-new/6703282663.html

        Clean F150 with the 300ci motor:
        denver.craigslist.org/cto/d/1990-ford-f150-4×4/6709411614.html

        You should consider if he really needs 4wd, going rwd will save a bundle and save on some complexity. Remember, 4wd really didn’t become a big thing on farm trucks until the 90s.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          Denver area. Will need 4WD to handle winters.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Good ideas, gtem. Thanks. I like the idea of the Dakota – it’s smaller. He doesn’t necessarily need a full size.

          Any other general brands/models to look at that are newer, with more modern safety stuff?

          Here in Denver, 4wd is a highly desirable option.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            Used fleet spec F150 ’09-’14 era (XL in white, with 4wd and hopefully maintenance records from the fleet that ran it). I’m less of a fan of GMs of this era, although I like the 4.3L+4wd combo, I don’t think Ford offered their 3.7L with 4wd. I’d almost prefer the older 5.4L than the first few years of the 5.0L, there were a smattering of serious internal engine issues on those early Coyotes.

            My brother just middled a deal this summer, a farmer friend sold his neighbor a really clean 100k mile ’00 Silverado in classic farmer spec for $2500: V8, 4wd, reg cab and 8 foot bed. That’s the sort of thing I’d be looking for. Older but taken care of, pocket the change for a rainy day.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      If the kid is smart and he only needs a small pickup, buy a good second hand Frontier. It should be reliable enough and far cheaper.

  • avatar
    jh26036

    Not sure what you mean it is a sucker bet. It’s a calculated decision and try to minimize total cost of ownership. Another sure bet that you ain’t going to lose your shirt is a Wrangler…

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Right but if you didn’t hate the truck, resale value wouldn’t be a concern. I considered the Tacoma crew cab in ’04, only for its wow “resale”, otherwise wasn’t really a fan, but bought a comparable F-150 plus V8 for thousands less, that I’m still happy with, currently driving it into the ground.

      I’ll let a landscaper rebuild it, but hat’s where you get your money’s worth, not continually driving new trucks off the showroom for their resale value that you really don’t like.

      • 0 avatar
        thelaine

        Agreed. Unless it ends up having some particular design defect or gremlin, buy something you like, maintain it properly, and drive it until it disintegrates. I don’t worry about resale, because there is almost nothing left when I am done.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          My handyman already offered me $1,000 for my well worn ’04 F-150 Supercab STX when the engine or trans grenades (seats destroyed, 1 big side dent, hail damage, trail pin stripes, etc). I stopped servicing the truck years ago, just topping off fluids, so all it does is make me money.

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            Trail pinstrips…Pretty funny. I was told that those are called “Tennessee” pinstripes

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            What’s funny is the bright red paint still shines good, though it rarely gets washed, usually just a dry towel dusting, between washings.

            No clear-coat, just factory single stage, but that’s probably why it looks so good, especially on the hood and roof. Non metallic red hides a lot of the damage, probably from the glare in bright light.

            But at 30 ft and 30 mph, the truck still shows good!

      • 0 avatar
        salmonmigration

        I dunno, this screams fallacy to me. Almost nobody keeps their vehicles long enough for them to go to the junkyard when they’re done. The average length of ownership is about 7 years.

        For most people resale should still be a major concern that far out.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          That’s part of problem. Most don’t really like what they bought, and at 7 years they can’t stand it any more. I always say spend a little (or a lot) more for what you really want, and after 7 years if you’re bored with it, go for the custom exhaust, lift/susp/wheels, tuning, gears, stereo, and or paint, upholstery, etc.

          I’m sure you know many that can’t even go the 7 years. Even with incredible resale value, it’s still a waste constantly driving new vehicles off the lot they don’t really like nor intend to keep long.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          salmonmigration,
          I think you’ll find the average is over 11 years in the US and climbing. This means that people are hanging onto cars or cars are lasting longer than in the past (imports??)

          • 0 avatar
            salmonmigration

            Big Al, that number is the average age of cars on the road. The average length of ownership is a lot shorter.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            That’s not quite true, Big Al. At least, not here in the US. The typical buyer of a vehicle from the showroom tends to only keep that vehicle 5-7 years now. At one time it would have only been 3 years or so. They keep them longer now because the financing is stretched out to as much as 8 years today.

            On the other hand, the average age of vehicles on the road is pushing towards 15 years, usually in the hands of a second or third owner. In my own case, I tend to keep my cars and trucks longer (when purchased new) and have averaged about 10 years between three such vehicles in the last twenty-two years (owning two different vehicles with only one driver in the house for 15 of them.) However, I’m not average. Nearly everyone I know driving a car 10 years old or older, purchased that car or truck used.

          • 0 avatar
            CaddyDaddy

            Don’t argue with big ol’ Al. To him facts are a messy subject. If you read his posts he suffers from a serious case of Trump Derangement Syndrome. It’s getting old.

            Tacoma, most uncomfortable, underpowered, gas guzzling Stone Age vehicle out there. As I stated before, Toyota does an excellent job of marketing perceived quality. If you drive a BMW and need a truck, you buy a Tacoma. The official truck of virtue signalers from the micro brew pub parking lot in Boulder to the cross country skiing trailhead in Nederland.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            https://www.cnbc.com/2017/05/28/car-owners-are-holding-their-vehicles-for-longer-which-is-both-good-and-bad.html

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            https://www.energy.gov/eere/vehicles/articles/fact-997-october-2-2017-average-age-cars-and-light-trucks-was-almost-12-years

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            This link is interesting as it states that the data is showing domestic vehicles are around 3 years older than imports.

            https://www.ratchetandwrench.com/articles/6136-average-vehicle-age-in-us-reaching-record-levels

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            salmon,
            I will take what you state into consideration, as many people only buy used. Thanks.

  • avatar
    TwoBelugas

    “The current crop of Toyota pickups are good, solid machines. This is proven by their continued sales performance, particularly the Tacoma and 4Runner. ”

    By that logic Jeep Wranglers are the best vehicles sold on the market today since it has better resale than both and sales numbers are through the roof with minimal incentives.

  • avatar
    Carrera

    I was impressed by the Tundra’s back seat. Most spacious among 2018. I haven’t tried the 2019 New Ram yet. The rest of the inside screamed “cheap” though. Even their Limited 1795 or whatever wasn’t that special. As for the Tacoma…I went and sat inside an Extra Cab. Very dissapointed. Slightly better than the ancient Nissan. But this was a V6 SR5 for 32,000 MSRP. Crazy. Driving position bad as always, thin sounding doors, materials as cheap as in my Corolla.

  • avatar
    jfb43

    Gotta hand it to Toyota. They put zero effort into these three vehicles, and they still sell well. Any other brand, and they’d be destined for fleet sales or discontinuation. I see the allure of the 4Runner in today’s marketplace, but I have no idea what keeps people paying a premium for a Tacoma or Tundra with the alternatives that are out there.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      Reliability is more important that latest gadgetry.

      • 0 avatar
        jfb43

        Based on recent rusting problems with their trucks, I don’t know how one can assert Toyotas are more reliable or better made than anything the Big 3 offer. Simple systems may be cheaper to fix, but they aren’t necessarily more reliable.

        I guess perceptions from the 90s and early 00s are tough to shake, and Toyota keeps riding that wave.

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          …I guess perceptions from the 90s and early 00s are tough to shake, and Toyota keeps riding that wave…

          Took Detroit a good 25 years to destroy their reputation. Toyota hasn’t slid down anywhere close to the level of ineptitude, but “peak Toyota” was about two-decades ago now. This is most visible on models like the Camry and Corolla.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          Rusting problems on Tacomas are anything BUT recent; yet they still command the highest resale rate of all pickup trucks as they age at nearly 50% after five years. This suggests that despite the rust, the Toyota keeps going when the others would have fallen apart.

      • 0 avatar
        SD 328I

        In terms of resale, not in terms of sales. The Tundra sales are very small compared to Ford, GM or Ram sales.

        However, it’s not like the domestic fullsize trucks are terrible with resale, they have higher than average resale value as well, just not as high as the Tundra.

        Part of that is Toyota’s reputation for reliability, which is important on the used market. But part if it is simply there are less of them sold and less to go around.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          There’s a difference between resale rate and resale value. One is the highest amount of dollars, which the high-priced American trucks tend to sell for more, even used. But those resale dollars are typically well below 50% of MSRP compared to the Toyotas.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      jfb43,
      Toyota here in Australia have done the same, selling previous generation tech for motor vehicles and making a good profit. I suppose reliability is higher using proven tech and production costs cheaper. Add that to high mark ups and you have a winner.

      I’d bet this iteration of the Tacoma and 4Runner will be the last in the US. I think the US will modernise and move to the Toyota IMV platform as the Hilux uses. The US might even get the Fortuner and Prado then. That would be great.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    The Tundra has the best looking front end of all the full-sized trucks, with the Ram coming in second. All the rest are still trying for Fake Big Rig.

    On the other hand, the Tacoma is looking like the Ford Ranger’s new nose.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Vulpine,
      I’d have to say the new Ram is a great looking truck. Makes the F-150 look out dated with it’s unstylish slabs of aluminium.

      GM are Tonka derivatives.

      The Tundra I’m so hot on, could use a new front end.

      I think the Colorado is by far the best looking midsizer, until the Ranger comes along, that’s a sharp looking pickup.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        Prior to the trims above, I agree with you 100%; the Ram has been the best LOOKING model for years and the more recent grilles look far more sleek and ‘sexy’ than those big slabs of fake chrome that GM and Ford have been presenting with their latest iterations. That said, this new trim for the Tundra brings the trucks back to what they are, personally operated vehicles meant for individual use, not Fake Big Rigs. Even Ram has been moving in this direction somewhat but the Tundra is the first one to actually get there.

        I’m taking delivery on a brand-new Colorado myself very soon and I will be looking to see how much chrome it carries. If I recall correctly, the bodywork around the grille is body-colored. If I find chrome, even if it’s just the bar across the center of the grille, I’ll be looking to get it painted or skinned to match or blacked out. The chromed strips that used to surround the windshield or edge the window slots in the doors would be acceptable but I’m not looking for flash; I’ve got other things in mind for how to decorate the truck.

  • avatar
    White Shadow

    The 4Runner is a joke at this point. This 5th generation has been around since 2009 (MY 2010) and still uses an ancient 5-speed automatic transmission. It’s low tech, inefficient, and ugly. Yet Toyota somehow manages to keep selling them. Can there really be that many Toyota fan boys out there? Then again, it seems that soccer moms are perhaps the people most often driving these things. Personally, I don’t get it.

    • 0 avatar
      jfb43

      To be honest, I’d consider it simply because it’s still body-on-frame. Imagine the demand if they actually updated the powertrain and gave people what they’re actually paying for? $45k+ for a TRD Pro in current form? That’s pretty nuts.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      I’m not a Toyota fan boy by any means but if they gave the 4Runner a headunit out of the 21st century instead of the outdated unit in it now, they could keep selling it for another 6 years otherwise unchanged. The 5 speed always knows what gear to be in, something my 17 Z71 with 5.3 and 6 speed has no idea on how to accomplish. I give big kudos for that. Likewise my 4Runner averages 19.8MPG with lots of city driving, no Traverse, highlander, pilot or otherwise is going to be getting significantly better MPG than that. And to top it off the 4Runner has no air dams to contend with, has a solid length frame, and solid axle, and a nice decently sized engine.

      It’s a great package no matter how old it is, but Toyota desperately needs to update its infotainment.

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      Spend some time in a 4Runner and you might get it. I felt the same way when a friend bought one but after being it it for awhile there is something about it that grows on you…

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        @husky: “Spend some time in a 4Runner and you might get it. I felt the same way when a friend bought one but after being it it for awhile there is something about it that grows on you…”

        —- I’m betting it’s not the off-road prowess.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          ” I’m betting it’s not the off-road prowess.”

          Why not?

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @gtem: Because not once in any off-road activities in which I’ve participated have I seen a single 4-Runner. I’ve seen full-sized pickups trying the trails but never a 4-Runner.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            You might want to get out more then. No doubt for weekend offroad romps or serious crawling the solid axle Jeeps own that space, with SAS’d old yotas playing second fiddle. But for people living in mountain towns that need to actually rely on something to get them around, Toyota 4wds have been a staple for decades now. In the fairly new (to the US) “overlanding” space of offroading, Toyotas rule the roost. And going off the of video below, Subaru has perhaps outgunned everyone altogether.

            youtu.be/xNfSW7yJ4HI?t=506

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      Plus one on the don’t get it…

      I rented one out of Midway a few weeks back and put a couple of hundred miles on it in Chicago traffic. It had some quirks that really bothered me after about a half hour in traffic and I would need to try another one before advising against it. The thing just about made me sea-sick. I was in rush hour stop and go traffic (the only kind of traffic in Chicago grr…really don’t like that place) and every time I had to apply the brakes the front end would drop 3 inches or more. Then travel back to even as soon as brake was released. I can’t fathom that all them do this, it was awful and would be a deal killer for sure.

      Granted I was in garbage traffic, so of course it drank fuel. Which is fine, so does everything else in that type of traffic. But….at least the rental grade Silverado can get the heck out of its own way when you mat it. The 4Runner is not going to win any speed contests…ever.

      I am going to grab another one in the near future to see if I had a bad one.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        “. I can’t fathom that all them do this,”

        Nope that’s normal. Short of the KDSS system or other adjustable or expensive suspension, it seems to be the cost to pay for a durable suspension with a reasonably comfortable ride, adequate suspension travel, and good durability. My old 3rd gen used to dive more, until I put KYB shocks on it. Much improved handling with less pitch, at a cost of ride comfort.

  • avatar
    Bob Roberts

    The “Texas-based arm of Toyota” is responsible for the Nightshade version of the 4Runner?

    That’s interesting, especially since all 4Runners are manufactured in Japan at Toyota’s Tahara Aichi factory, unlike the Texas built Tundra and Tacoma models…

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Design studios are often far away from assembly plants. Or we’d have the Tacoma TRD Baja Tacos de Pescado Run Edition.

    • 0 avatar
      Peter Gazis

      Most Tacomas are built in Mexico. A DW explosion about Tokyo/Tijuana motors can’t be that far off.

      • 0 avatar
        el scotto

        DW doesn’t roll that way. He does spin up on poorly managed companies where management hubris prevents them from understanding their own ineptitude and overall clueless-ness about the industry. Or, Lexus/Toyota parts made in China for JDM/NA bound vehicles ain’t happening. Parts that are deep in the bowels of an Escalade/Silverado are being made by Chinese companies who were the lowest bidder. Big hint: few if any GM quality personnel or GM quality subcontractors are at the Chinese plant. You with your hand up? Nope, lots -o- ‘Muricans at the Foxcon plant. Even in NA the Japanese can (and often do)run stricter quality controls for sub-assemblies than their American counterparts. Those are some of the twigs that make the kindling for DW’s fires. He provides his own gas.

      • 0 avatar
        el scotto

        Also, Mexico = Not Communists, likes us overall. China = Communists, don’t like us overall. Or, there won’t be a “Fox News Alert” over the Battle of Ensenada. A “Fox News Alert” over contested island somewere in the Pacific? Maybe.

  • avatar
    whynotaztec

    I never drove a 4Runner until just recently as a rental in LA. Not too bad in most respects but the drivetrain was overwhelmed on any type of hilly highway.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      4Runners are rental fodder???

      I’m stunned by that. <– not sarcasm.

    • 0 avatar
      markf

      “but the drive train was overwhelmed on any type of hilly highway”

      Hell yes. I have a 2017 4Runner Off Road. It’s great when actually driving off road and ok on flat highways but as soon as I drive West out of Colorado Springs you fight the damn transmission on every hill/mountain.It is terrible and needs to be updated. Hell, my 2011Sienna has a 6spd transmission they can’t stick a 6spd in the 4Runner?

      I think leaving the 4runner old is some type of strategy to push people to a Lexus GX with an 8cyl and modern transmission…..

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        You could always buy a Yaris. 100ish HP lawn mower engine tied to a 4-speed automatic with torsion beam suspension, steel rims, drum brakes…

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          “100ish HP lawn mower engine tied to a 4-speed automatic with torsion beam suspension, steel rims, drum brakes…”

          Sounds like something that will last 400k miles.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @gtem: If you’re going that small, go Fiat 500 with the 6-speed automatic. A surprisingly lively little car for only having 101 horses.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            “@gtem: If you’re going that small, go Fiat 500 with the 6-speed automatic. A surprisingly lively little car for only having 101 horses.”

            I can think of no better polar opposite of a simple small car that can rack up serious mileage than a Fiat 500. Absolutely epic sh*tshows of cars, the multi-air engines especially, going off what my brother and his friends have seen in the seedy underworld of used car diagnostics on Staten Island.

          • 0 avatar
            Fordson

            This makes me feel old – I can remember when this site was at least somewhat dedicated to automotive enthusiasts – now it seems like the intended audience is those who wanna play fleet manager, whose sole interest in things automotive is keeping TCO as low as possible.

            If someone told me I’d be spending 400k miles in a Yaris, I’d try to bargain for maybe 500 hours of community service and 5 years probation instead.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @gtem: If you actually drove one for more than 5 minutes, maybe, just maybe, you’d learn to appreciate just how good that little car is. Believe me, it’s nowhere NEAR as bad as you want to believe, no matter what your prejudicial friends say.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            My prejudicial friends have to write those turds up for multi-air valve solenoids/actuators all the time ($$) so I’ll go off of that and steer clear. Why couldn’t they just use a regular valve train?

  • avatar

    The SR trim of the Tacoma doesn’t even get Intermittent windshield wipers. While Keyless entry and Cruise are options. (and the only two options you can purchase).

    This this appearance package bring anything else to the table besides back trim and wheels?

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    @gtem: That’s what you say/they claim. However, now having owned two DIFFERENT multi-air vehicles with no engine (or other drivetrain) issues in either one, I find the claims questionable at best. Not outright claiming they’re false, just finding them hard to believe.

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