By on July 12, 2018

While the returning Toyota Supra should be big news, the endless parade of teasers without any real information has left everyone feeling burned out. We previously announced that the vehicle would debut at the Goodwood Festival of Speed this week. But Toyota later clarified that the car we would see wouldn’t be the production version and remain camouflaged, resulting in rage-induced nose bleeds at automotive-media outlets across the globe.

Our expectations couldn’t be lower but we still had to check and see if any new information could be gleaned from the event. We definitely got a better look at it but technical specifications remained elusive. We did learn a thing or two, though.

Seeing the Supra in its A90 camouflage still doesn’t give us a clear picture of what the production unit might look like. However watching it pivot on the track did give us some new angles. The car is curvier than pervious still images would have you believe and it seems to borrow more from the A80 than initially thought. Although, it is definitely not a throwback vehicle.

Toyota already confirmed the vehicle would use an inline-six, which we already knew since it’d be sharing it with BMW. But commentators noted its output figures, assumedly based on the specs given by the manufacturer. While still estimates, they claimed roughly 340 horsepower and a curb weight of around 3,300 lbs — Nissan 370Z territory.

Those numbers also matched unverified leaks from Toyota’s home office. Back in February, rumors emerged that the new Supra’s 3.0-liter straight-six would make 335 hp and the car would weigh 3,284 pounds.

The commentators noted “that is ordinary sports car stuff these days,” which we are inclined to agree with. It’s certainly not awful and it should result in an incredibly fun package, if Toyota’s suspension claims are to be believed. But it’s also not a major leap foreword over its predecessor.

 

[Images: Toyota]

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28 Comments on “Toyota Drove the New Supra Around Goodwood, Did We Learn Anything?...”


  • avatar
    Sub-600

    That’s even better than WWII “crazy quilt” naval camouflage.

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus

    I’ve learned that there is no way this car, or any car, could live up to the hype they’ve built around it. They’re just setting up fans for disappointment IMO.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      Indeed, the problem with the A80 is that it came along in magical time for Japan and they could build a monster slayer at a fairly good price point.

      Easy were the days when Japanese manufacturers could develop vanity products at a loss and when the competition wasn’t altogether that sophisticated in the US at least. Now its a different ballgame. US manufacturers offer some outstanding product (if a little rough around the edges in some case – talking about you Ford and your less than industry standard fit and finish – but I digress) when it comes to overall performance that punches well above thier weight leaving more storied brands to rely on thier snob appeal to get the job done or just ladle on expensive and complex solutions to restore that delta in performance.

      As an example I remarked elsewhere about the Lexus LC500 for 92k in base trim and has a 5 liter V8 that is only marginally more powerful than Ford’s coyote and that may only be on paper since the Coyote V8’s performance in the Mustang via its drag strip numbers (both elapsed time and speed indicate a higher output) in a car that is nearly twice the price of an extensively equipped Mustang GT and never mind that in the real world on-ramp rush the Mustang would crush the LC500 simply by dint of the difference in weight (4300 pounds as opposed to 3800 with the loaded Mustang).

  • avatar
    Carroll Prescott

    This will be the only time it doesn’t cause projectile vomiting from anyone looking at it.

  • avatar
    W210Driver

    Why are people complaining about 335-horsepower in a relatively light and compact (by today‘s standards) sports car that isn’t even on the market yet?

    Maybe they should wait until it‘s been driven and reviewed. It is my understanding that more power isn‘t necessarily going to improve the driving experience since it can ruin the balance and fine-tuning of a vehicle that was designed with specific power outputs in mind for those exact reasons; balance.

    • 0 avatar
      Drew8MR

      My 325whp Evo VIII weighs like 32-33 and you absolutely cannot get on it on the street except very rarely. On the track? Yeah, further behind every year,but plenty,plenty of power for the street.

    • 0 avatar
      Lockstops

      I am most disappointed if that weight figure is correct. Horsepower isn’t really that important as long as it’s in the ballpark. Engine type is really important and this has a straight six which is probably the best engine type (except maybe a V12 but those are really heavy), but points taken off due to it being turbocharged.

      But that weight is a very big issue. One thing that could redeem it somewhat is that they don’t put in squishy bushings everywhere to take out all feel from everything and everywhere like is done in almost every other car.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      People aren’t complaining about the car as much as the needlessly drawn out release of it. Every time there’s a news article about it there’s no new info. Nobody cares that much about this.

      But since we are discussing the car, I don’t really see much point in getting excited about a Toyota 370Z for more money either.

    • 0 avatar

      If it’s priced right, I won’t complain.

  • avatar
    jalop1991

    “But Toyota later clarified that the car we would see wouldn’t be the production version and remain camouflaged”

    So Toyota said it wouldn’t remain camouflaged.

    And yet it’s camouflaged.

    Or maybe, just maybe, literacy is lacking here somewhere…

  • avatar
    ajla

    Keep in mind this is a BMW engine going into the Supra and those tend to punch above their weight.

    335hp would mean it’s basically the engine from the M240i. That car weighs 3500lbs and does 0-60 in 4.3 (12.7 @ 111). The lighter Toyota should be a tenth or two quicker.

    Price is the big question. If the MSRP begins with a “4” then I think it might have some legs. If its price starts over $60K then I think it is sunk.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      I agree 100 percent. If the number starts with a 4, I’ll buy one. However that is 330 money. Sadly I am thinking a 6.

    • 0 avatar
      Drew8MR

      The Supra cost $45 in 1995. I’d be surprised if it was that cheap, but the numbers aren’t as impressive versus the competition either.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        My thought is that the M240i starts at $45K, the 440i starts at $51K, and a full-whack M2 starts at $55K.

        So I’d think a high $40s starting price would be reasonable (after all this is a Z4 cousin, not a fraternal 8-series or LC), and I’m hoping Toyota is looking to bridge the gap between the high $20s 86 and mid $60s RC-f.

        But, OTOH, something like an Evora is high $80s, so I guess we’ll see.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      Aside from looks or extensive track duty I struggle to think of why anyone would get this over a similarly priced/equipped M240i, or even a 340i

      I had a stock Z and a modded G… the G was every bit as fun to live with as the Z without the 2 seater impracticality and deafening hatchback tire roar. And speaking of the Z, a 370Z Sport with the 19″ Rays, VLSD and Akebonos is $34K. If you are really hardcore you will get the base for $30K and furnish it out yourself. I would do Tein Flex Z coilovers ($900), RockAuto Akebono calipers + 2 piece rotors ($1500 or so), some light 18x10s on meaty tires ($2000 or so), Quaife LSD ($2000 installed) and a 3″ exhaust with a Varex muffler ($1000 tops). So $36K for a real hairy chested track machine. Throw in another $500 or so for a double DIN head unit and you’re done. And that’s all of course if you go new. I would look for a salvage 350Z for track duty

      • 0 avatar
        Lockstops

        Exactly: if it’s going to weight the same as a 3-series then why the hell would anyone pay even the same amount, let alone more than a 3-series for a car with no rear seat?

  • avatar
    VW4motion

    By the time those stickers come off the toyoder it will be out of date like the other 98% of toyoders.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    I would have rather seen a throwback to the day when the Celica and Supra were closely related than this nonsense. Give me the 86 with a more sophisticated suspension and either the STI motor or a warmed up Subaru 6 and call it good. Yeah the “purists” will scream, but it would be closer to the original than a BMW.

  • avatar
    Lockstops

    The most surprising thing is that apparently this was the result of a trade between Toyota and BMW: Toyota gave their hydrogen tech to BMW and BMW gave Toyota this sports car to share. Strange if true, one wouldn’t think that the hydrogen tech is so valuable or necessary as BMW has done its own hydrogen research for decades. Could be that it’s the fuel cell tech that was the main thing, that I can understand might be very valuable.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    Borrrrrrriiiiinnnggg.

    This is coolest thing to happen at Goodwood this year – a chase up the hill by an original Bullitt Mustang *and* an original Bullitt Charger.

    https://www.hemmings.com/blog/2018/07/13/goodwood-festival-of-speed-hosts-bullitt-chase-reunion/

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Toyota with BMW engine!

    WHAT COULD GO WRONG?!?!?!

    • 0 avatar
      06M3S54B32

      Nobody makes a better inline 6 than BMW. Should be a cool car.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Hopefully it is a BMW engine with a Totoya cooling system.

      • 0 avatar
        Lightspeed

        Yeah, I’m quite worried about that. Why turn over the thing you do most reliably to another company? I think too Toyota has kind of botched this thing. The introduction has been drawn out waaay too long, people have gotten fed up and bought other cars by now. The camouflage trick at Goodwood only made it worse. The only thing they’ve done right is return to an inline six. Sad to say, it’s going to be a slow seller seen as an overpriced 86, unless the driving experience is magical unicorn quality.


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