By on February 21, 2018

We covered this one a couple of years ago but it’s being featured again today because *just look at it*!! Plus, your author happened upon a fantastic example in rural British Columbia just yesterday, causing him to dance excitedly in the snow like a hotwired puppy.

The 4Runner showed up in 1984, based off the Pickup/Hilux platform and providing the off-road chops to challenge the original Cherokee. For its ’90 redesign (available in calendar year ’89), Toyota saw fit to depart from the agricultural roots of the OG 4Runner, which was essentially a pickup truck with a fibreglass cap grafted onto the box.

Now sporting handsome and cleanly contoured sheetmetal, the gen-2 4Runner arrived at the perfect time to ride the wave of customers trading their cars for SUVs, a trend which, it must be said, has not abated in the least.

The new-for-’90 4Runner had a remarkably high floor, ensuring that folks who wanted an SUV simply for the image would take one look at the liftover height into the cargo area and make a beeline to the nearest Ford store to sign the note on one of those new Explorers.

If a poser managed to make it past the jump-up-into-the-driver’s-seat cost of entry, at least we knew they were working for their social status. Buyers of all trims were greeted by a full complement of easy-to-read gauges, reclining cloth buckets, and a full fabric headliner. Hey, this was heady stuff 30 years ago.

If it appeared drivers were especially sweaty, that probably meant they were wrangling a base model SR5, where power steering was not standard equipment. Yes, power steering was an option as late as 1990, but think of all the money drivers saved on a gym membership. 

Base 4Runners of this vintage were equipped with a five-speed stick and Toyota’s legendary 22RE fuel injected SOHC four-cylinder. A 3.0-liter V6 was on offer, cranking out 150 horsepower, compared to the smaller mill’s 116 hp.

Not yet swayed by today’s trend of offering vehicles with all the visual color of a Charlie Chaplin movie, the ’90 4Runner was available in no less than 12 different shades of paint and four distinct interior colours. These things look best in Cardinal Red, always have. Feel free to disagree. Feel free to be wrong.

I maintain that early 90s Toyota was peak Toyota, cranking out good-looking, reliable machinery with well-screwed-together interiors. Asking price may have outstripped its competitors (witness a fully loaded ’90 4Runner for $25,779, or $43,943 in 2016 dollars) but, for once, buyers got what they paid for.

Bulletproof engine, baseball-bat manual shifter sticking out of the floor, rugged good looks, and some off-road chops. If that doesn’t check off the Ace of Base boxes, I don’t know what will.

[Images: Toyota]

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61 Comments on “Ace of Base Retro: 1990 Toyota 4Runner...”


  • avatar
    kcflyer

    What a great looking, timeless design. Too bad the current crop of designers have gone with the road going catfish look.

  • avatar
    redapple

    KC
    Agreed. Current Toyota styling is real real ugly.
    BAD

    RE: old Toyota trucks. The only thing worse than extended driving a car where your ankles are at the same height as your hips is vehicle like a 4 runner.

  • avatar
    Sub-600

    “but think of all the money drivers saved on a gym membership.” Hahaha, that’s funny. Power steering is really something we take for granted. No driving with your knees while multitasking without that assist. I parked next to a current 4Runner the other day, still not a bad looking truck.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      I put a necker’s knob on my manual steering 67 Mustang. It’s still a workout to maneuver around the parking lot.

      My wife (when a teenager) would occasionally borrow her Dad’s 1972 Chevy truck with 350 V8 and “Armstrong” steering. I’m amazed that 5’3″ dance team/cheerleader her could get it parked in the high school parking lot.

  • avatar
    MrGrieves

    Was this the generation of 4Runner that had a tilt gauge / artificial horizon built into the dash to help off-roaders avoid rollovers? Classic design. The generation after this one is probably my favorite 4Runner, though.

    • 0 avatar
      jjster6

      Believe you are thinking of the Mitsubishi Montero. If they still made this exact Forerunner today I would buy it in a heart beat. New one… not so much.

    • 0 avatar
      Middle-Aged Miata Man

      The original 84-89 4Runner offered an inclinometer/artificial horizon/compass combo, like the Montero as jjster6 notes. I don’t think it carried over to this generation.

  • avatar
    jh26036

    This thing is friggin’ sweet.

    I am a frequent visitor to the local pick n pull and so many of these were rusting away. It was actually surprising how many of them were manuals. I don’t see them at the junkyard anymore these days, most of these 2nd gens were gone around 8-10 years ago. They are now full of 3rd gen 4Runners, again, taken out likely by rust.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      Yep, frame rot gets the 3rd gens. You can have a totally clean body with just a bit of rust on the bumpers, but the frame is a horror show. My buddy bought an ’02 just like that for what seemed like a great price (128k miles, $3k). We poked a few holes in the frame with a screw driver while inspecting it after the fact. Nothing safety critical yet, but in 3-4 years it will be ready for the scrapper without some major welding. Sad, because the rest of the truck is so incredibly well built and long lasting.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    I think you made gtem’s day.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      Yep. haha

      I will selfishly argue though that peak 4runner was the subsequent generation: the vaunted 3rd gen 4runner (’96-’02 in the US).

      2nd gen is basically a more comfortable/solid body placed on top of the gen 1 chassis. Said body is very rust prone anywhere salt is applied to roads. The frame however, holds up well. It is a heavy duty Hilux frame. IFS is of the torsion bar kind, very durable but doesn’t ride or articulate particularly well. Motors are just okay: the 3VZ has a reputation for popping headgaskets due to a incorrect head-bolt spec as Toyota shifted away from asbestos based headgaskets, that’s how I’ve heard it anyways. On top of that the “3.Slow” doesn’t make very good torque or power considering the curb weight, and is quite thirsty. Finally, there are a litany of vacuum hoses and other nuances that make working on the 3VZ less than pleasant. Having said all that, they are very sturdy, very capable trucks.

      3rd gen: vastly better body rust proofing due to galvanization. Underpinnings shifted from Hilux to Prado 90 “medium duty” underpinnings. Lighter (thinner) frame that is more at risk of rust-through, and new double wishbone IFS. Rides a lot better, better wheel travel offroad, more accurate rack and pinion steering. Lower balljoint design can lead to unexpected failure at high mileage if not inspected correctly (unloading the joint). Longer wheelbase gives more stable handling dynamics and more passenger room. Engines better across the board: 150hp 3RZ chain driven 4cyl, 3.4L V6 5VZFE is substantially more powerful/torquey, better MPG, easier to work on, no systemic HG failures. These are 500k+ motors with a modicum of care. Another big factor was the introduction of a factory optional locking rear diff. This makes a big difference offroad. I’d argue a factory stock 3rd gen 4Runner with the factory rear locker is one of the most technically capable offroad vehicles solid in the US within the past few decades, up there (but not besting) Wrangler Rubicons and Power Wagons and such. The 4Runner is sized well for tight trails and has good geometric clearance and wheel travel.

      • 0 avatar

        I have more 4Runner incoming! Perhaps tomorrow or Friday.

        It’s got two doors.

      • 0 avatar
        stevelyon

        Thanks for the informative post, gtem – I dig learning about these trucks.

        I was in a 4-door one of these that suffered a rear tire blowout on Route 66 a few years ago. Got sideways in the ditch and rolled 2.5 times, but everyone was OK. Good little truck. Turned out the tires on the truck were 9 years old.

      • 0 avatar
        Lee Wilcox

        Mine is a 95 and I would prefer that is were a 96. After I bought it I read about the generatiional differences but I am happy anyway. No salt on these roads and no rust at all on the frame last time I was under it.

        My pastures are waterlogged and two days ago I went into them with a trailer and a round bale of hay. Couldn’t have done it with any other vehicles I have used for that purpose. Would have been hopelessly stuck. Went out in 2wd and shifted to 4wd when I felt the slippage. No problem.

        It is what it is and I’m very satisfied. If I could wave a wand and make changes it would have the 4cyl and roll up windows with no sunroof. The wife hates the aforementioned floorboard (which changed later I hear) so it doesn’t get many miles. I laugh about it being my Japanese Mercedes but it is the most solid vehicle I can remember driving.

        Gtem, I share your enthusiasm for the 4Runner. I note that the Highlander scores almost as high on the long term quality index and they are bested only by the Land Cruiser. I think I have become a Toyota fanboy after using Datsun/Nissan trucks for so many years. ymmv

  • avatar
    redapple

    Aint a great vehicle if you cant drive it for 3 hours.
    (uncomfortable).

    Nostalgia is best left in the past.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      FWIW I drive my ’96 (subsequent gen but similar seating position) for 13+ hours at a time, the record being a 17 hour straight shot from the OBX back home to Indiana.

      • 0 avatar
        Landau Calrissian

        Same with my 1998. I’ve heard other people complain about how low the seat is mounted (same with the Tacoma), but it’s perfect for my 6’3″ 260lb flesh vessel.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          4Runners have a reputation for the seat feeling like it’s mounted on the floor legs straight in front of you, right?

          If so I’ve got to test drive one just to see if it is like my classic Mustang, just much higher off the ground. (driving position that is)

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            Yeah, the 4th gen (’03-’09) started to raise the seat a bit, and by the 5th gen it is more or less a regular “chair” type position as I recall.

            I think it does make the roof lower and the overall COG noticeably lower (at least the COG perceived by the driver). Makes twisty road driving both on-road and off more confident and less tippy. Headroom suffers as well as a result. But loading canoes and such isn’t too bad either.

          • 0 avatar
            Prado

            I find the complaints of the 4Runners seating position to be overblown. Sitting in a 96 4Runner, is like sitting in a 96 Accord.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            Prado you’re spot on, but the thing is those Accords (and Honda sedans in general) have always been known for a low seating position, conversely most SUVs have traditionally had more chair-like seating arrangements. So when the Honda sedan seating position is encountered in an SUV, it is seen as unusual and worth commenting on. But I agree that it is not inherently uncomfortable or awkward, except maybe upon entry if you’ve removed the side-steps like I have.

    • 0 avatar
      geozinger

      At least for me, this was true of this generation of Toyota trucks. I’m 6’0″ with a 32″ inseam, but it always felt like my legs were too long for the cab(s).

      These were tinny little things too. I was a dealer rally (I sold these back in the day) and one of the competitive vehicles they had was a Ford Ranger and an Explorer. They considered them the target (for sales), against which we would sell.

      Maybe the mechanicals of the Ranger/Explorer were not the best, but they used better materials, thicker sheet metal and more of it, too…

  • avatar
    tonyola

    You didn’t see many two-doors of this generation, although they were neat-looking. I seem to remember that, unlike the four-door 4runners, the two door models were subject to the “chicken tax” and were therefore more expensive.

  • avatar
    cimarron typeR

    I literally drove by a 2 door of this generation this morning.Unfortunately it had rolled off of I470 likely last night, as this morning the freeway was mostly clear of ice.It looked like occupants were safe as passenger compartment was mostly unintruded(assuming seat belts were worn). Kinda reminded me of the Top Gear Hilux diesel that wouldn’t die

  • avatar

    For 1990 the 4Runner didn’t get the sombrero badge like the rest of the lineup?

  • avatar
    Landau Calrissian

    I have this truck, but the 1998 version. I’ve owned it for 9 years and 133k miles. Base model 2.7L, and the only options are an automatic transmission and 4WD. It still has power windows/locks/steering and AC. The V6 would be faster, but still not actually fast, and I would have gone through a few timing belts by now (291k miles). Manual would be even better, but when I bought it, it was a solid 3rd gen for the price of some problematic 2nd gen trucks, and I couldn’t pass up the deal.

  • avatar
    Marathon Mike

    I’m hoping for some good old fashioned advice. I’m about to replace my trusty 2008 Ford Expedition. I have been leaning strongly towards buying a 2018 Tahoe. I know about the new Expy, but am so turned off by the peeling paint issues I have, that I taking a pass on FoMoCo for this purchase. Recently the 4Runner landed on my short list. I know thery’re Not a direct comp to the Tahoe, but for me, it’s got me wondering… Advice anyone?

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      What is the primary use of your vehicle?

      Commute? How often do you tow? Do you go off-road? What are your “must haves”? (heated seats? Bluetooth? etc.)

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        Agreed with Dan, we need more user requirements. Tahoe will be the better highway mile burner hands down, and won’t give up much in the way of MPG. An SR5 4Runner can pretty seriously undercut a Tahoe on price which could be a factor. Both will have strong resale, the Tahoe’s very good, the 4Runner’s even better. I’d give the 4Runner the edge in reliability both short and long-term, although I think that’s not a huge gap aside from some of the early build K2XX GMs. A minor thing but incredibly handy and nice to have: the 4Runner’s roll-down hatch glass.

        Out of left field: have you considered a new Armada? Price splits the difference between Tahoe and 4Runner, superior road manners and interior room to both (third row especially). Beastly powertrain. The SVs with 1980s Japan-era quilted velour and piping are my fetish.

      • 0 avatar
        Marathon Mike

        I appreciate all of the good advice and responses. The primary use is just a basic commute of 15 miles round-trip. Having a dependable vehicle for snowy Winters and occasional towing of an 18 foot boat . Some off-roading but nothing my Expedition couldn’t easily handle. I test drove a 4Runner today and while nice, it did feel small for me and I found myself appreciating my Expy more. Surprised there’s no climate control. I really like the idea of something as close to bulletproof reliability, which is why I’m intrigued by this ride.

    • 0 avatar
      Cole Trickle

      These are wildly different vehicles, and the differences really come down to taste. Do you like driving a big living room down the road? I do. I have a 2015 Yukon and I love it. Gas mileage will be about the same in real world use. Resale values are different for sure. A 4runner depreciates slower, but after 10 years they’ll be worth about the same depending on condition.

      The Tahoe has no business doing any serious off-roading but it will tow more and more comfortably fit more adults.

    • 0 avatar
      Heavymetal_Hippie

      I just purchased a new 4Runner two weeks ago. I traded a recent F-150. After the shoddy interior and occasional problems with the Ford, I am done with American cars probably for good. Especially when you compare to how Toyota is building cars. I tell you: the 4Runner blows away anything out there currently. Sure, the Tahoe is okay and capable, but the fit and finish of the 4Runner are in a totally different league. Better price, as well. For under $38k, I got a 2018 SR5, three rows of seats (seats seven), beefy 4.0 engine which is unkillable, leather inside, just enough navigation/audio that you need, with nothing you don’t.

      The 4Runner is in one of its best years, as all the bugs and problems have been worked out long ago.

      Finally, look at residual value of the 4Runner. Top 3 or 4 out of any cars built in the last few years. USED ones that are a few years old are going for only a few thousand off MSRP. That’s some indicator of quality and buyer satisfaction years down the road. I can’t say enough good things about my new Toyota.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        To be fair the 4Runner third row is pretty abysmal in terms of comfort. The Tahoe’s isn’t great either but I’m willing to bet it’s better. From what I’ve heard, the Armada’s is legitimately usable for grown people (Expedition also excels in this area owing to IRS packaging).

    • 0 avatar
      TW5

      I’ve owned 3 different gens of 4Runners and 2 gens of Tahoes/Yukons. They are both body-on-frame with 2/4wd options, but they are very different vehicles in terms of operation and long-term ownership.

      Tahoes are wide and have lots of interior space. The passenger compartment seems to have narrowed over the years, but it’s still spacious. Tahoe offers third row seating. I think it’s still removable, but it might be fold down on the newest gen. Either way, it’s nice to have. The Tahoe is great for towing, and it has good road manners because it’s longer, wider, and heavier than purpose-built offroaders.. The newest Tahoes are also quite refined for a truck. Small-block GM V8s are about the only engines that can rival Toyota for longevity, but Tahoes are usually let down by auxiliary system failures, like alternator, fuel pump, etc. They also have a history of electronic gremlins in GM traction control systems.

      4Runners are built to satisfy the active lifestyle crowd. The top offroad trims like TRD Pro or Trail have excellent offroad performance and sophisticated 4wd systems, including locking rear diff and ATRAC passive front “differential” (active braking). The Limited 4Runner trims are comparable to the nicest stuff from GM, and Limited offers available 3rd row. 4Runners are narrower and smaller than Tahoes because smaller dimensions are generally preferable offroad. The Toyota 4.0L V6 is legend. Toyota auxiliary components also tend to last without issues. The weak link on Toyota trucks are the brakes and ABS systems. The brakes have historically been prone to warping, and the ABS systems have had bad controllers at various points in their history. The old frame rust problems have been addressed, imo, not sure about the braking gremlins.

      If it were me, I’d probably buy the 4Runner. Tahoes have become so expensive that ordinary trims cost as much as the 4Runner TRD Pro. The 4Runner TRD Pro is a coveted vehicle, and it will probably retain 50% of MSRP (or more) after 10 years of ownership because it is unique. However, TRD Pro is not the best family vehicle, and it broadcasts a certain personality, which you may not prefer, if you’re conducting business or picking up friends for a night on the town. Tahoe/Yukon are probably better at the $50,000+ price point for “normal” use. If you want to save money, get a 4Runner Limited. They top out with 4wd around $48K, and they are nice enough to impress anyone.

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    “Bulletproof engine,”

    The gutless, zero torque on the bottom end 3.0 V6? Your kidding right?…….LOL

    I only say that because I owned a ’93 Toy PU with that engine for almost 11 years. Seems to me it was in the shop for a week while Toy motors fixed that “bullet proof” engine.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    What a classic design (although I think I like the 4-door versions better). Peak Toyota, especially for those of us in un-rusty places.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      “What a classic design (although I think I like the 4-door versions better). Peak Toyota, especially for those of us in un-rusty places.”

      Agree. Remember when Toyota had some of the best looking trucks on the road. Don’t get me wrong in ’93 for a compact PU nothing compared to the Toyota. Despite the wimpy V6 under the hood I’d still buy one again but I would do it right the second time and get the SR5 trim vs the cheap $hit deluxe that I had.

      I sold mine to a buddy and it made 20 salty MN winters before the frame started rusting away. The body at that point I think was still in pretty good shape.

  • avatar
    cimarron typeR

    I’ve not driven the current Tahoe, but I know the Suburban version has a much more comfortable ride and nicer interior than current 4R Limited.Expect a trans rebuild at around 150-175k or so on the GM though, from friends’ experiences.

  • avatar
    TW5

    These 2nd-gen 4Runners are pretty cool, but they have their quirks. The 22RE is a legendary engine with solid reliability, but the 4-cylinder 4Runners were equipped with the old gear-drive transfer cases, not Toyotas updated (at the time) chain drive transfer case. Some people claim this is an advantage, but it seems like a dubious claim to me. The 2nd-gen rear suspension is known for sagging, a crazy state of affairs because Toyota upgraded the rear suspension specifically to avoid sagging problems experienced on the 1st-gen. Like many older 4Runners, the 2nd-gen has rust problems.

    The N120 is a funny vehicle, imo. It dies hard, but it also struggles to stay healthy. Take it or leave it.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      The 3rd gens have saggy-butt syndrome as well over time, I think Toyota was replacing rear coil springs for free under a low-key recall back in the day. Thankfully swapping springs on them is fairly trivial. I cheaped out and got Moogs, $55 for the pair IIRC, and some adjustable Monroe air shocks for load leveling while I was at it.

      • 0 avatar
        TW5

        Smart move. I should have put adjustable rear shocks on my 120. Luckily my N180 never had sagging issues. However, it only lived to 150,000 miles before it was taken. Maybe it needed more mileage.

      • 0 avatar
        brandloyalty

        The equivalent Pathfinder’s SE version came standard with adjustable shocks on all four corners. We sold our ’91 when it was 11 years old and 200,000 km, still with the original shocks.

  • avatar
    statikboy

    I have a bit of a hate-on for modern S/CUV’s but these things were built to a purpose. Look at that ground clearance. Look at those sidewalls! ZOMG!! Look at that glass!!1!

  • avatar
    jamesianLA

    “I maintain that early 90s Toyota was peak Toyota, cranking out good-looking, reliable machinery with well-screwed-together interiors”

    I couldn’t agree more! I drove a 2017 Camry and was appalled at the cheap interior plastics and wobbly switchgear. Toyota of 1992 would have never produced such a mediocre car.

    BTW, I think the 1990s was peak for most Japanese vehicles, especially Nissan, Honda and Toyota.

  • avatar
    crease77

    Great, great vehicles. Had a 98 Limited and an 86 Sr5 and I regret getting rid of them both to this day. Had no idea that the 2nd gen was even offered with 2 doors.

  • avatar
    ThomasSchiffer

    My neighbor had a 5-door diesel version. It was dark blue and was of course equipped with a manual transmission. I do not know the model year, but it was an early 1990s model (this was 1991/1992).

    I remember it being very loud (it always woke me up in the morning) and having rust issues within a few years. But it was a good-looking vehicle and I found it to be relatively comfortable when I rode in it a handful of times.

  • avatar
    brandloyalty

    The equivalent Pathfinder was a better vehicle, but Toyota fandom carried the day. The Pathfinder’s front torsion bar suspension allowed providing drive to the front wheels while mounting the engine low.

    The 4Runner ended up sticking the front wheel drive stuff below the engine, resulting in the nose-high stance. The consequences of the basically flawed design included a very high centre of gravity and that strange high floor. The seating area was as small as the same era’s Corolla.

    The cabin was so narrow that on bad roads occupants would hit their heads on the side windows. Been there done that. The narrow width, high COG and rounded styling resulted in rollovers. And they would just keep rolling. On the other hand the Pathfinder was far less prone to rolling and the square body resisted prolonged rolling.

    Both were prone to rusting, probably the 4Runner being worse. The 4Runner also had a power rear hatch window that always broke. Offroad they were equals. The only advantage of the 4Runner was its longer cargo area. As the less popular vehicle the Pathfinder was a far better buy.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      I assume you’re talking about the WD-21 BOF pathfinder here, not the R50 that followed.

      Nissans rotted worse than the 4Runners, especially in the sense that they had structural rust issues (frame) and not just on the sheetmetal like the gen 2 4Runners. I do like those old Pathfinders, they are incredibly robust vehicles. I’d be curious to learn more about the differences in IFS and front diff/driveshaft layout that you claim allowed Nissan to have a more compact layout with lower COG. I was always under the impression that the 4Runners just had higher clearance all around.

  • avatar
    Scout_Number_4

    I bought a ’92 SR5, 4-door, 5-sp, V6, leather new–$23,008. Mine was cardinal red, had those classic Toyota alloys of that era plus factory running boards. I drove it 175,000 miles all over Western North America, mostly in Oregon, Washington, BC and Alberta. It was fantastic in the mud and snow.

    The only problem I had was THE BIG ONE–head gasket failure at 99,900 miles which destroyed the motor. Luckily for me, Toyota declared the head gasket a factory defect and paid for a new engine and gave me a late model Camry to drive during the 8 weeks it took to make the repairs. When I arrived in the tow truck at the dealers, the shop was littered with trucks and 4Runners with the motors out–getting parts was apparently an issue.

    I loved that rig, but once married with children it became small. I sold it in 2001 for $7800. Not a bad run. Now that the nest is empty, I may get another one.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      Go for it! A clean low mile 2nd gen is getting harder to find, but it is easier to find with a 5spd than a 3rd gen 5spd (which carry a massive premium). A decent higher mile 2nd gen can be found for $2500-3000, a really nice one might top out near $5-6k. 3rd gens run the gamut from $3k for a mechanically sound higher mile (200k+) early-year 4wd/auto/V6 (no locker) up to $11-12k for a really clean late-year 5spd V6/4wd/locked truck (the true unicorns). Various modifications such as the TRD supercharger, lifts, degree of rust on the underside drive prices a lot as well. For reference I paid $6300 for a mint one owner ’96 Limited with rear locker, 99k miles and no winter driving for over a decade (excellent frame and underbody) back in 2013. At present with 146k it’d sell for about $7k here in the Midwest on an enthusiast forum owing to the clean condition, particularly the lack of rust on the frame.

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