By on January 26, 2018

“Mr. Bond, they have a saying in Chicago: Once is happenstance. Twice is coincidence. Three times is enemy action.” Thus spake Auric Goldfinger — and I’m starting to think he had a point.

About this time last year, my 2014 Accord Coupe was smacked on the rump by a cheerful part-time weed dealer in a battered Mazda2. It could have been a lot more hassle than it was. The kid was willing to wait for the cops, his insurance company was slow to act but friendly enough once they got started, and the insurance-selected body shop actually did a half-decent job of installing and painting a new bumper.

I should note that part of the reason everything went so well was my determination to not get agitated about the incident and its repercussions. As long-time TTAC readers know, I’m very fond of my Accord, but it’s fundamentally a cheap little car built right here in Ohio by a bunch of teenagers.

Had it been my 911 or my old Audi S5 in that little fender-bender, I would have raised all sorts of hell and insisted on using my own body shop and having a third-party inspection and so on. Or at least that’s what I did every time one of my “nice” cars was damaged by someone else. Hell, when my 1990 VW Fox was dented on a downtown street some time in 1994 I contrived to have the repair done by the only Lamborghini and Ferrari certified shop in Ohio. It was too nice. The paint on the repair was deeper and glossier than the Brazilian factory spray.

If last year’s Accord injury was happenstance, then what happened to me yesterday was coincidence. Once again my car’s been damaged by an utter idiot — but as you’ll see, this time there’s nothing I can do but grin and bear it.


Whenever somebody asks me what I do for a living, I have no real idea how to respond. The truth is that I’m usually doing between two and four jobs at any given time. I have a pretty varied resume that includes time in fields as prestigious as management consulting and grocery bagging. I’ve owned a few companies and I’ve worked a lot of contract gigs as well. As fate would have it, I am in the middle of winding down one of those contract gigs as we speak. It’s with a Fortune 100 firm that has handed over pretty much its entire tech infrastructure to H1-Bs. I was the only native-born American on a 50-person team; it’s interesting to see how all the public-facing talk about “diversity” and “representation” goes straight out the window when the outsourcing companies get involved. There were 400 employees in my building. I never saw an African-American or a disabled person or a 50-year-old woman or pretty much anybody besides an Indian between the ages of 25 and 40.

With that said, the majority of my co-workers are pretty mellow dudes. Some of them are even car fanatics and/or motorcyclists. As I found out during my time in Malaysia, however, there are real and enduring differences between the way things are done in Ohio and the way they are done overseas, particularly when it comes to vehicle operation. So it pays to keep your eyes up from the minute you get on the access road to the office.

Pretty much every day there’s some kind of drama in the parking lot, and it’s not uncommon for the security department to issue sternly worded all-hands emails about the Camry or Corolla that has simply been abandoned in the middle of an aisle. Earlier this year, I had to bring my Honda CB1100 to a screeching halt and jump off the thing because there was a woman tearing around a corner towards me, on the wrong side of the aisle, at a fair rate of speed, in a temp-tagged 2007 Camry with her head pointed towards the back seat. She came to a ABS-skipping stop about a foot away from the bike, shot me a look that people commonly direct towards dog shit on the street, then leaned on her horn. I picked up the bike and moved it out of her way. On the trunk there was a sticker that said “NEW DRIVER BE PATIENT”.

Last month the company lost the lease on some parking spaces adjacent to the building and now we have 400-plus people competing for 300-ish spots. Things are getting crazy. I can’t take my truck to work any more because people will park in the aisle and leave me without enough room to leave my spot. So it’s the Accord or the bike. My contract ends in a few days and, to be honest, I was just in the process of congratulating myself for surviving the six months when I came out and saw a Maxima jammed into my Honda’s back bumper. Two hits to the rear in 11 months. What are the odds?

The damage is pretty minor — but it’s also pretty annoying. Although the bumper bent under the pressure of the Nissan’s license plate, it snapped back without too much trouble. Unfortunately, the chrome strip that lines the bumper on trimmed-out Accords has developed a couple dozen spiderweb cracks. It wasn’t meant to be bent like that. I’m not sure about the condition of the paint surrounding it — I will have to wait until I can clean the car up.

Had this happened to my Phaetons, I’d be utterly livid. With the Accord, I can’t bring myself to care very much. It’s a $76 part, although I’m not sure how to replace it. I’m not even particularly worried about the so-called “principle of the thing.” We have a lot of people in the building buying cars that they are explicitly incompetent to operate. There’s a nearly new Charger in the lot that has basketball-sized dents on all corners. The vast majority of the vehicles have some sort of damage on them. It’s probably a miracle that my Accord lasted five months and three weeks without being smacked.

I could file a report with the company, but doing so would cast a pall over my relationship with the various corporate entities involved in my placement. They don’t like troublemakers, particularly when there is an inexhaustible source of replacements across the ocean. Maybe it’s my fault for working gigs that amount to commodity labor. But I’m a parent, a racer, and a writer before I’m an employee. I’d have to reshuffle that order if I wanted to try my hand at being a corporate director or officer. It’s not worth it. I like seeing my son while there’s still daylight outside, even in the winter.

There’s one silver lining to the whole stupid incident: it reinforces a decision I made a while back. Around the time that the Challenger T/A 392 came out, I decided I was going to let the Accord go and get myself a proper six-speed Chally before FCA called time on the whole ridiculous operation. I looked at order books and I made some calls about getting a discount on the car. But then I got hurt in a bike crash and I kind of forgot about going through with it. Sitting here tonight, with my twice-scarred Honda sitting nearly paid off in the driveway, that lazy choice now seems more prescient than Paul Atreides walking the streets after the stone burner blinded him in Dune Messiah.

If somebody bashed up my lime-green Challenger T/A… I don’t care what Goldfinger says. How could I see it as anything but enemy action?

[Images: Jack Baruth/TTAC]

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141 Comments on “Trackday Diaries: Pull up to the Bumper, Baby...”


  • avatar
    Detroit-Iron

    Where I work the employees are almost all citizens, for reasons. My buddy moved on to a place with more flexible attitudes about hiring H1Bs. Hearing his horror stories about the condition of the bathrooms is both disgusting and hilarious.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      There was a story recently about India and driving safety. There are obvious cultural differences in relation to driving and vehicle damage. Those living in more rural settings with low population density are accustomed to “large personal space”. That extends to driving. We see that all of the time. How does one react when tailgated or someone squeezes in front of you? I’ve been in big cities that are very “white” and “personal space” is much less when walking around and when driving.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        True, but what evidence do we have that someone from India did this?

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @FreedMike – his entire story paints that picture.

          • 0 avatar
            Jack Baruth

            I didn’t want to come right out and say it but yes it was.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            And now we know.

            On the topic of Indians who are new to the U.S., I’ll just say this: fellas, you have a LOT to learn about living in America. I’m leaving it at that.

        • 0 avatar
          Detroit-Iron

          Who said anything about Indians? That is a pretty racist assumption. Maybe it was Icelanders that were mistaken for Norwegians and the wrecked bathrooms were a result of hákarl and the wrecked cars were a result of the famously poor driving skills of the nordic people.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Detroit-Iron –

            Jack is a very good writer. Good writers like any good artist paint a picture of the image they want to convey.

            “I didn’t want to come right out and say it but yes it was.”

            I was expecting someone to play the “racist” card after I made my comment.

          • 0 avatar
            Detroit-Iron

            @Lou, that wasn’t directed at you. It’s a little convoluted but the joke made sense in my head.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Detroit-Iron – thank you. I appreciate the clarification.

  • avatar
    gtem

    This is an aspect of owning newer nicer cars that I forget about. Even with my plebian 2012 Civic I was very choosy with parking spots, and worried when we got summer time hail storms. With my last few sub-$2000 daily drivers, it is a very liberating feeling to not worry at all about that stuff. The Ranger in particular. The windshield already had a crack, and the bumpers needed replacing (both things taken care of in time for sale). In the mean time I was king of the road and parking lots. The “$500” Pilot has some minor hail dings on the hood, and is painted a nice anodyne light grey that masks minor scratches, dirt, etc.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Yep. I protect my year-old car like a mama bear protects her cubs. It’s new, and I’m leasing it.

      A few weeks ago, I took out my old ’03 Buick (which I more or less gave to my daughter) to see how it’s running (pretty well, actually). I left it in a parking lot, and when I came back some idiot in CR-V parked quite a ways off center, which left about a foot between it and my driver’s door. I had to keep the door pinned against the other car and squeeze in. Needless to say, I just happened to open the door a little fast and – whoopsie daisy! – left a nice little ding on the other car’s door. Hey, if this a-hole wants to act like this is New York, then his car should look like it’s from New York, right?

      No way I’d have done that in my new car.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        That’s exactly how I did it in the Ranger. Squeeze me in on the side? Well buddy my driver’s side door detent is missing (it really was), and what happens, happens.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        That crap really grinds my gears. One day some zipperhead in an Audi with temp plates parked so close that it was all I could do to squeeze my fat arse into my old Volvo. So much so I put one heck of a crease in their passenger side door. Which I felt bad about for about a nanosecond.

        And under the heading of Indian drivers – last fall I lent my BMW wagon to a friend to use as his wedding car. He, the bride, and his parents were stopped in traffic when some Indian dude (in Portland, ME, the whitest city in the nation) ran into the back of them. I will give the guy credit, once I got an estimate from BMW for the repair he just wrote me a check for it. No insurance claim, but there is a police report so it probably will show up on Carfax. I may not bother to have it fixed, just a couple scratches and divots from the license plate screws, but the car was pristine. Sigh.

        • 0 avatar
          lnakamur

          Zipperhead? seriously? Were you raised in a barn? Do you think that there are no Asians reading this blog? I’m asian American and even I will admit that recent immigrants are often bad drivers. The extra racism wasn’t needed.

        • 0 avatar
          Hydromatic

          “Zipperhead”? Now there’s a slur I haven’t seen or heard in ages.

          • 0 avatar
            30-mile fetch

            Yeah, I’d be damned careful with that one. Some of the sources for the slur include tire tracks left on the corpses of enemy soldiers after Army jeeps ran them over, and a description of what a high powered round does to the head.

            That’s not sh*t you just casually toss out in conversation.

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            On the bright side, I learned a new word today and got to experience some interesting mental imagery.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Sorry, krhodes, that was out of line.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            I’ve never heard the term before. I’m quite sure I could have gone the rest of my life without hearing it, and would have been just fine doing so.

        • 0 avatar
          Malforus

          Damn its true the folks out in Westbrook don’t know how to speak respectfully.

          I mean, the folks over at 292 should build the fence a bit higher.

          Never know what kind of charming behavior is going next door.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        …Hey, if this a-hole wants to act like this is New York, then his car should look like it’s from New York, right?…

        What an ignorant statement, bub. If you were talking bumper to bumper parking, well the “audible” parking method is alive and well in NYC. Your CR-V driver was parked next to you, and although they parked like a jerk, they did not touch your car. Which means you have no right to touch their car. You are way in the wrong here. Had they dinged your car, well, then your physical response (not your stupid verbal response) would have been more than justified.

        • 0 avatar
          Detroit-Iron

          People who haven’t been there don’t know this, but native New Yorkers are much nicer than than they are portrayed in media. The last time I was up there we parked my new mini/giant van millimeters away from the beater next to us in the Staten Island Ferry parking lot. So close that we took pictures of the other guy’s license plate in case he banged up our car. Came back hours later, not a scratch.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Wasn’t saying anything bad per se about New Yorkers, guys…fact is, they park the way I’m talking about because parking there is nightmarishly scarce, and inevitably people squeeze into too-small spaces. As a result, their cars often end up battle-scarred.

            But there’s no excuse to park like that in suburban Denver. Anyone who does is an a-hole.

            @Detroit-Iron:
            You’re right about New Yorkers – they’ll go out of their way to help you, but they’ll do it hurriedly. Some people take it as rudeness, but it’s not – they’re generally just pressed for time. Thus is life in the Big Apple.

  • avatar
    Detroit-Iron

    Back on topic. One time I was renewing my license at the DMV and watched as one person read the other the test in a foreign language. I am 1000% sure he wasn’t also feeding him the answers.

    • 0 avatar
      redapple

      If you cant read the test, how can you read road signs?

      This makes as much sense as having voting ballots in foreign languages. (start hate storm).

      My logic is (obviously), if you cant read and speak english, you are not participating in the knowledge and news flow that you should base your vote on.

      • 0 avatar
        mtunofun

        When I was in Quebec, all the road signs were in French. Imanaged.

        • 0 avatar
          Lorenzo

          The French use the standard western alphabet. A lot of countries have their own script. In college, I had so much trouble with the cyrillic alphabet, I dropped Russian and took German.

          I can imagine the difficulty of people who not only have to learn the most difficult language to master, but an entirely new script as well.

          As for French traffic signs, left is gauche, right is droite, straight ahead is tout droit, arretez is stop, lent is slow, and I don’t care what yield is because nobody does.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      Have a similar story about how I walked out of the County Title Office to find that my car had been keyed! (This after having just received the paper title to that car, which I had just paid off!)

      Thankfully, this time, the actual title arrived straight from Honda Financial!! :-)

    • 0 avatar
      Detroit-Iron

      I think you are both missing the point. Imagine if you had to take a standardized test of some kind, for example a driver’s license test. Only, instead of having to answer the questions as written, the person who created the test was reading you the questions. Even if you and the other person were not outright cheating, you could say to the the person reading that you didn’t understand the question and they could expound and clarify.

      I mean, like, what if like, American teenagers could have, like, someone translate the questions into emojis? Would you be comfortable on the road with the person who “passed” the test that way?

  • avatar
    Sub-600

    There would have been an incident and I would have been terminated. Damage to my car as an unwritten condition of employment? Not happening. I lack both the social skills and requisite patience. You must be a pretty centered person, Jack.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      It was having a child that did it.

      Changes your perspective on the worth of a product.

      • 0 avatar
        ClutchCarGo

        It’s also a matter of keeping perspective on what matters and not getting upset about things that don’t really matter. I find that I enjoy life more when I let things go even when I would be justified in making a fuss. There are enough things to get worked up about without looking for more.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      Did the same thing a year ago, when a customer at my parents’ garage sale backed into my car, which was parked across the street, as he was leaving! (Since he had an Ohio DUI plate on the car, I felt justified in ripping the SOB a new one! My Dad nearly had to wait with me inside the house, because I might have become violent!)

      Turns out this yahoo had a list of priors as long as my arm, though fortunately for him, he didn’t garner enough points for a suspension! (He went to the City violations bureau the same day and paid the ticket!)

      For diminished value to the car (and the week in a horrible Jeep Compass while my car was being fixed), he deserved a little wrath!

    • 0 avatar
      baggins

      Sub-600, maybe this sort of short term thinking is where you got your credit score.

      Why would you get lose thousands of dollars and damage your career by getting fired for cause over a bumper?

      • 0 avatar
        Sub-600

        My screen name has to do with a time when I owned a Mitsubishi and everyone thought I was broke, my credit is excellent. My kid is grown, has several degrees, and is on her own. When she was young I bit my tongue many times so I could provide for my family. Now I’m retired and don’t have to suffer imbeciles like the one who hit Jack’s car.

  • avatar
    PenguinBoy

    “Around the time that the Challenger T/A 392 came out, I decided I was going to let the Accord go and get myself a proper six-speed Chally before FCA called time on the whole ridiculous operation.”

    You have good taste!

    But it can be liberating to have a perfectly serviceable car that you’re not too fussed about in the fleet – seems like the Accord fits the bill perfectly for you.

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      This. Given how decent even mediocre cars are these days, there’s no point in getting too invested in a daily driver. I don’t want to have to worry about every idiot who might ding my ride.

      Couple years ago I was parked in a rest area when an idiot in a BMW pulled in next to me and threw his door open, banging into my passenger door loudly. Pissed me off, then I remembered I was driving a state-owned stripper Ford Ranger. I hope the moron scraped his door edge, but beyond that, meh. There’s a lot to be said for the car as an appliance mindset.

      • 0 avatar
        sgeffe

        Well, it wasn’t YOUR vehicle!

        Kind of like the bus driver who T-boned me (ran a red) in a body-shop loaner Focus on the morning I had dropped off the car at said body shop to have the key mark fixed that I received in the parking lot of the title bureau after paying it off! Then, that useless bus driver copped a “faulty equipment” plea!

  • avatar
    seth1065

    hey at least the had car ins , my car was hit 2 in 12 months with me stopped both times, no insurance either time, so my policy covered it and i was out $500 deductible but it was fixed by the shop of my choice.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Do you not get to choose the shop in your state? In mine no matter what, where the car gets fixed is up to you, and they can’t use used parts without your explicit permission (assuming the cost difference doesn’t total the car). Of course the insurance company will try to temp you to use their shop of choice with assorted BS, but ultimately it is your decision.

      And like Jack, I always have used the REALLY high end shops.

  • avatar
    NoID

    Yes, the freedom of driving a used vehicle that you don’t particularly care about anymore is divine.

    Good call on the Chally, though I recommend the Scat Pack Shaker. It’s just more fun to watch the intake bouncing around through the hole in the hood.

  • avatar
    Elusivellama

    >As long-time TTAC readers know, I’m very fond of my Accord, but it’s fundamentally a cheap little car built right here in Ohio by a bunch of teenagers.

    I hear the Acura models are made in the same factory as the Accord (Marysville, Ohio). Acura announced a new turbo V6 engine, big changes to the RDX (showing the way forward for future Acura models) and the return of the Type-S badge. These are indications that a hotter, spicier TLX SH-AWD turbo V6 are in the works.

    Would you let the place of manufacture and its workforce stop you from buying one of these, if it was made there? What about Acura’s engineering talent and such? Genuine question – I’m aiming to upgrade in 3 years or so, and a 350 – 400hp TLX SH-AWD with that 10 speed transmission is very tempting to me. My fear is not paying enough attention to WHERE the car is made, and the team behind it…just wondering what you think.

    Of course, I know the above TLX model is not even a rumor at this point, nobody really knows how the new engine is going to be used, or even if Acura is going to do the TLX justice, or whatever. I guess I’m just looking for a general sense of what you think about Acura now, and what Acura says it is trying to become in the future and whether to believe them or not.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      The current TLX is a nice car and the turbo would be nicer.

      The Marysville Assembly Plant is old and it’s not very robotic but they do good work in pretty much everything but paint.

    • 0 avatar
      MartyToo

      The 2019 TLX should be wonderful but is the Acura paint as crappy as the Honda paint? My 2013 Accord coupe has 3 failings:
      Paint
      Seat support and leather
      I’m so old I forgot the 3rd one!

      I really want AWD and I’m worried the 19 TLX might sport a turbo 4.

      Assuming I’m alive in a year I’ll be attempting a deal on 12/31 or 1/31. Anyone know how too score discounts on Acuras?

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    What kind of bozo just leaves his car like that, jammed into someone’s back bumper?

    Sounds like it was time for that job to end anyway.

    • 0 avatar
      Dirty Dingus McGee

      4th word in your comment explains it.

    • 0 avatar
      cbrworm

      I can’t tell you how many times I’ve left my rental car parked somewhere in a city and have had a hard time getting it out of park because the person who parked into me didn’t even roll back afterwards.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      I read somewhere that “park by braille” is very common in some big cities.

      https://www.google.ca/search?q=bumper+protectors&rlz=1C1GGRV_enCA764CA764&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=GOtyxHcGxX_ZVM%253A%252C-KYIOOOs1wDFMM%252C_&usg=__3q5qV71nT9Rl2NpyESbUPiGXQiE%3D&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwir1v_l1vbYAhUM3mMKHYr4D98Q9QEIQDAC#imgrc=GOtyxHcGxX_ZVM:

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      I found a Jeep that had backed into my then-girlfriend’s Escort back in high school, the vehicle was still in contact with ours. Not only that, but since we had parked at the very first space, the Jeep was blocking half of the exit where busses came out. We called the police over there (he was nearby) and he shrugged his shoulders and walked off. If the Escort had been 2/10ths of an inch past the beginning of the red line, we would have gotten a ticket, guaranteed, but a school administrator? Nahh, its cool.

  • avatar
    Plamry

    Sucks when people don’t care about taking care of their stuff and thereby don’t care about yours

    Jack. Two words: used Hellcat. My local dealer has a 2015 Challenger Hellcat manual with about 6000 miles on it listed for 48K. I bet they would take less. It’s in New Lisbon, WI. Ask for Derek.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I don’t think I’d buy a used Hellcat unless the owner was a very close friend. Lord only knows what kind of abuse that thing took over those 6,000 miles.

      • 0 avatar
        Sub-600

        Used Hellcat? You wouldn’t have to remember where you parked, just follow the smell of the clutch.

      • 0 avatar
        rpn453

        I don’t think a used Hellcat is a scary purchase. I’d be nowhere near as cautious as if I were buying a used WRX, where you can seriously abuse the engine with just a programmer and do horrible things to the clutch on launches. You wouldn’t be able to put much of the Hellcat’s power into the clutch before the tires break loose, so any excessive clutch wear would have to come from incompetence.

        Also, Hellcat buyers are typically older guys with money. A far more caring and knowledgeable previous-owner demographic than most used cars.

    • 0 avatar
      Fordson

      So, let’s see – thats 6,000 X 4…so 24,000 times past the christmas tree.

      And the original clutch, you say – ?

      Such a deal…

  • avatar
    JMII

    So the parking lot is the track? I was waiting for “trackday” part of this story to kick in.

    I tend to park AWAY from others just for this reason. Less chance for door dings and other love taps, plus I get a few extra steps for the day. Granted if I lived someplace where ice and snow made walking miserable I might fight for a spot closer to the door. But that is whole point of a winter beater I guess.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @JMII – I’m careful about where I park my truck. it has a few dings in 7 years. My ex isn’t so careful and her 2010 Sienna looked like it was attacked by woodpeckers.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        My 95 Probe GT is still 100% ding free…and it took a lot of extra walking to keep it that way. I will often use my station car to “protect” one side of a nice car, but that can backfire. I had a Vette owner make some comment under his breath about “with all the spots you had to choose the one next to me..”. I looked at him and pointed to the sticker on the side windows that says “My other car is LT1 Powered”…if he did not get what I was doing from that then he should just sell his car.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      Yep! I park on the ends of rows where possible or, failing that, I park out where there’s more spots than cars! (I can walk..WTF! :-) )

      Started doing that with my previous car, the one keyed in the parking lot of the title bureau, after it received a YUUGE door ding..at CHURCH! If they aren’t going to take care there…!

  • avatar
    dal20402

    My condolences. Even with a 2014 Accord I would be so damn mad.

    This is why it’s really nice to take the bus to work every day. On the few occasions (maybe once a quarter) when I have to drive the LS460, I drive all the way down to the bottom level of the garage and park it in one specific spot where there are concrete pillars on both sides (and which is usually available because the yahoos don’t have the skill to back into it). Fortunately, at $369/month or $34/day, the garage is not oversubscribed.

  • avatar
    deanst

    This is why I like relatively inexpensive cars, and cars that have actual bumpers. One of my first cars was rear ended on the highway, with some minor damage to the bumper. On this $6500 car (new price), they spent about $1500 realigning the bumper and repainting it. A week later someone hit me on the highway again – I just told them to go – there was some blemishes on the previously beautiful bumper, but I couldn’t be bothered fixing it. One of my current cars has been hit 3 times in the back, with the bumper cover replaced twice. If they made a fuel efficient car with nice big shiny bumpers I would buy it.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      It’s especially nice how easily steel bumpers on a BOF vehicle are to swap out (using my aforementioned Ranger as an example). 4 bolts, a quick zip with a cordless impact and it’s off. Same procedure with the junkyard replacements, plus adjusting the side to side alignment using another set of smaller bolts in slotted holes. $40 a pop from the junkyard, where 1990s Rangers abound. And with close encounters with frozen snow banks and minor bumps, a steel bumper is much less likely to even show any scratches or damage in the first place. Gotta love it.

      • 0 avatar
        MartyToo

        Folks in NYC have started sporting this offensive weapons on their bumpers.

        https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/XVMAAOSwR0JUQCDq/s-l400.jpg

        I remember during the 73 or 74 gas crisis that a VW Bug whose driver was mad that he didn’t really have an “odd” license plate backed up into my chrome Torino bumper and put a 1/2 scratch in my chrome but a soccer ball size dent in his bug. He drove off and I took down the plate> I subsequently tracked down this beauty and every so often left a note on his windshield expressing my admiration for the way the dent was rusting.

        These days I would be arrested for stalking!

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      A few years back, I got rear-ended in my old Buick. The damage was limited to a crack and dent on the bumper, and a cracked taillight cover. All of this added up to a $1400 check from the guy’s insurance company. Did I spend that on cosmetic repairs for a 12-year-old car with over 120,000 miles? No way. I found a $75 replacement taillight from a junkyard that was on Ebay, and banked the rest (and as this was right after my divorce, Lord knows that money came in REAL handy).

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        My family cashed in when a friend’s neighbor backed their nice A6 into the driver’s door on our ’90 Civic wagon (valued at $1400 at the time per KBB). They were very apologetic and honest, and their insurance adjuster was very pleasant and cut us a $1200 check plus about $200 worth of rental car money we didn’t know we were entitled to. Buffed the minor impact, and sold the car a year later for $1400.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          I recently dented a car through a moment of inattention (kid ran the wrong way in parking lot, shopping cart rolled away while I chased him). Unfortunately it wasn’t a $1400 Civic but a pristine pearl white Porsche Cayenne. Cost me $1300.

  • avatar
    Middle-Aged Miata Man

    “Grin and bear it” is often the way to handle such incidents. Around this time last year, my neighbor’s wife scraped the front of her gargantuan Escalade against the left rear quarter panel and bumper of my parked Cadenza. There wasn’t a lot of damage, but a sheetmetal crease meant it would need more TLC than simply replacing the bumper.

    Despite the value I place in keeping my cars in excellent condition, and that the accident was caused by a contempt-provoking stereotype (oversized SUV, inattentive driver… yes, there was a cellphone involved) I was somewhat surprised by my nonchalant response to it. I never got angry – I actually laughed in good humor when I saw the damage – and she quickly got on the phone with her insurance company admitting guilt and arranging the repair appointment at the body shop of my choice. One week later, the car was fixed with a near-perfect match between the new and existing “Snow White Pearl” paint.

    The absolute worst part of the experience was the thoroughly subpar Chrysler 200 loaner. There’s a time and place for all behavior, and perhaps I should have angrily insisted on a better rental car.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      “near-perfect match between the new and existing “Snow White Pearl” paint.”

      This would kill me. I don’t care if I was driving a $10,000 Versa, if I bought a new car and someone damaged it, anything short of putting it back to 100% right would drive me up the wall. Call it OCD or an eye for detail, but paint mismatch drives me up the wall.

      • 0 avatar
        Middle-Aged Miata Man

        I’m the same way since I used to work in auto detail and paint & body repair. Unfortunately, it’s all-but impossible to match pearlescent paint as the newly-applied pearl coat will always “flop” differently than the original.

        This was seriously as good as it gets, though. Even I couldn’t spot a difference until the car was in direct sunlight; then, I could see an ever-so-slight yellow tinge in the new paint, but I had to really look for it. The new paint also exhibited far less orange peel than Kia’s finest.

      • 0 avatar

        YES.

        Non-matching paint by 1.4% and I’m probably gonna sell the car.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          Every other panel on my Coneston Green Rover has faded to a slightly different shade. I just call it camouflage.

          But the risk of not-matching is a lot of the reason I am probably going to just live with the scratches on my BMWs bumper. I had to have both ends of my white Saab 9-3SC done after two idiots in two weeks had their way with that car, and they definitely did not match well. But I sold the car soon after so never bothered to deal with it.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        My old Frontier didn’t match from the factory. The red on the plastic facia on the front wasn’t even close to the rest of the body. It was a fleet spec truck so I guess they figured it wouldn’t matter. I see several around like this.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      Next time I have to spend time in ANY Enterprise rental (Nationwide captive rental agency), I’ll pony up my own $$$ to get a Charger or something worthwhile!

      When I pranged my then year-old 2013 Accord on a stop-sign stanchion in my local Kroger parking lot, I spent a week in a Dodge Avenger with the 4-speed auto and wheezy four. Worst car I’ve ever driven! (Including my first car, a used-up, neglected 1978 Cutlass Salon with the Rocket 260!)

      Then in 2016, after my car got bumped (see up-thread about the “party plates” moron), my rent-a-wreck was a Jeep Compass with the same wheezing four, but the six-speed slushbox helped a little!

  • avatar
    Rick T.

    Got a couple of sweet spots at my current gig where there is a lightpole in the middle of a double roll of parking which practically results in about an additional 2 feet of width to park away from the next spot over.

    Practiced “safe parking” for many years in Chicago and now in Nashville. Had only one door ding in my 15 year old MB – may it burn in hellfire – and that was a result of an errant shopping cart being blown into it by a 30 mph wind gust.

  • avatar
    MrGrieves

    I got rear-ended while driving a rental car several years ago in El Segundo, CA. We both got out, the young man saw the damage he did, yelled “Aww, sh-t!” and jumped back in his car and got the heck out of there. Luckily I got his license plate. But since it was a rental paid for by my company (and their insurance), it ended up just being a funny story told to friends and relatives.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    I’m one of those who parks as far away as possible. Heck, I’m at the gym 5 days a week, why not add some extra walking time?

    What gets me is how many times I park far away from everyone else only to return to my car later and find some dipsh*t parked right next to my car, usually on my passenger side, with nothing but empty spaces around us.

    Actually waited once to ask the person who did this, why? Their response was “I figured that by parking where you did, that you were the type of person who takes care of their car, so I wouldn’t have to worry about my car if I parked next to yours.”

    Didn’t ask them why they didn’t park next to my driver’s side if that was their rational.

    Once went to a Wal-Mart (my mistake), came out and a shopping cart was jammed right into my driver’s side headlight assembly, breaking the lens. It had to be rammed in there deliberately as no gust of wind, etc would create the force required for that type of damage.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      My wife lived in a less than great apartment complex for a year and did some shopping at a walmart nearby. That and working at a hospital (using the general patient parking lot) left her then-almost new 2012 Camry with some pretty serious battle scars. On the flip side, she now had a very reliable newer car that no longer needed to be babied in regards to cosmetics. We’re just running the poor thing into the ground and it’s eating it right up. That’s not to say I don’t change the oil or neglect to touch up paint, but that car sees some absolutely brutal streets every day, and is lucky to see a carwash a few times a year.

    • 0 avatar
      Dingleberrypiez_Returns

      You actually waited for them? That’s hilarious. I’m pleased to hear their rationale, although I think there are just as many people who do it to intentionally irritate us.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      You’d be surprised what a rogue shopping cart can do. The Porsche Cayenne incident I related above came about from a shopping cart rolling about 25 feet on a gentle slope. It produced a large and very deep ding that couldn’t be handled through PDR and had to be taken to a traditional body shop. If the same amount of force had been applied to a plastic headlight I’m sure it would have broken.

  • avatar
    AndyYS

    In today’s high-traffic environment it makes sense to have two cars – a lesser car for everyday use and a nice car for special occasions and long trips. I was considering getting rid of my battered 2010 Sonata in favor of a 2018 model but now I’m thinking of holding onto it for a while.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      I always keep a beater around for the daily grind. I’ve doing the retired cop car thing for a few years now because it does make people either think you are a cop so they don’t cut you off, or because they think you are some poor dirt bag that has nothing to loose so they give you a wide berth.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    At work I park on the very end of the lot, as far as I can squeeze, and even partially over the farthest line. I’ve seen – too many times – people just open their doors all the way without even looking. My son is guilty of this. And I sound just like my dad when I lecture my son about it ;)

    MINI metal is pretty rugged but not _that_ rugged, especially against a F250 door.

  • avatar
    Secret Hi5

    Boston, NYC, Philly, etc – I see cars protected by a bumper “pad” that can flip in/out from the trunk. That’s what he needs, although not sure if such a gadget exists for the front bumper. It’s rather silly if one thinks about it: A protective shield for a bumper.

    Found it:
    https://www.amazon.com/BLACK-Bumper-Bully-Protector-Protection/dp/B000WLHGJA

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I think your ride would first have to have a front bumper.

    • 0 avatar
      MLS

      I’ve seen front bumper guards that mount around the license plate. Obviously would only be effective in some scenarios (i.e., similar bumper heights, with offending vehicle backing straight into the protected one behind), but it’s better than nothing, I guess.

      https://www.amazon.com/BumpShox-3-0-Protection-Ultimate-License/dp/B00B0QWXW6

      Living in Boston, I simply avoid on-street parking at all costs.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Or buy a vehicle that is also available as a “police interceptor” and you’d be amazed at the available bumper guards.

        http://blackhorseoffroad.com/ has some protectors for all kinds of vehicles, even a few minivans.

  • avatar
    pb35

    I park my 2017 SS in one of the parking garages at a large state university during the day. I always (used to) park in the corner spots to avoid door dings. One day while washing my car at about the 3 month mark, I noticed that the lower valence was had several large-ish scratches and a small dimple above the exhaust. After getting mildly peeved about it, I stepped 5 feet back and could no longer see it. I didn’t rush to touch it up or buy a new valence for $120 painted.

    My point is Jack, once you get to be ahem, our age these things just matter less. Same thing with interior rattles, I would bring my new car back 5x attempting to get a rattle fixed and they would often wind up breaking something else in the process. Now, I just turn the stereo up and I feel fine.

  • avatar
    azmtbkr81

    One of the benefits of owning a Wrangler with steel, powder-coated rock sliders is that door dingers suffer much worse than I do for their carelessness.

    • 0 avatar
      MoparRocker74

      ^THIS^. I’ve owned 5 CJ’s and Wranglers, most had beefy tubular rock crawler style front bumpers, nerf bars, and a reciever hitch. 3 had lifts and oversized tires. When theres little sheet metal at all and nothing below mid-thigh level and rarely even doors, it’s amazing how hard it is to pick up idiot damage on the road. In the boonies it’s different, of course. The first time I owned a normal car (turbo hatchback) it was shocking that I actually had to be careful. Short sidewall tires and low air dams do NOT like curbs.

    • 0 avatar
      MoparRocker74

      ^THIS^. I’ve owned 5 CJ’s and Wranglers, most had beefy tubular rock crawler style front bumpers, nerf bars, and a reciever hitch. 3 had lifts and oversized tires. When theres little sheet metal at all and nothing below mid-thigh level and rarely even doors, it’s amazing how hard it is to pick up idiot damage on the road. In the boonies it’s different, of course. The first time I owned a normal car (turbo hatchback) it was shocking that I actually had to be careful. Short sidewall tires and low air dams do NOT like curbs.

  • avatar
    Dingleberrypiez_Returns

    Inconsiderate parkers are the worst, and unfortunately are the norm. I garage park my weekend car, and street park my DD immediately in front of the garage. My neighbors who own their homes and have been there a while are typically excellent, but the renters who haven’t been here long are freaking horrible. This one woman in an Insight has scratched my bumper parking by “feel” twice already; I’m sure it’s her, because you can clearly see how the license plate screws line up perfectly with the scratches. Zero remorse for her actions, completely unaware of what’s she’s doing. It’s to the point where if she’s parked in front of my house, I park around the corner.

    As a bonus, I think this is her typical parking method, and it appears to have pissed someone off. A few weeks ago I noticed someone had keyed the entire left side of her car.

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    Actually, as ya’ll sit in whether a Fit or a Jaguar, or a Moronello FXV-SPWSHAW, bumbling along at your high intensity 14 mph over the speed limit whilst slowing down for highway joints, a realization should come upon you that all cars are commodities and all of them are just as fast as the car in front, and the car behind you.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I was about 90% at fault in my last accident, which was at work.

    The parking lot at a recent employer was shaped like a picture frame around the building, and traffic was permitted in *both* directions. Cars could park against the building, or on the outer rim, as it were, and traffic passed between them.

    Returning from lunch on a sunny day in November 2014, I was temporarily blinded by the sunlight as I rounded the first corner of the lot, heading counter-clockwise. But I cut an inside track, and spotted a coworker’s 6-month-old Accord coming straight at me on the apex of the turn, but too late. He stopped cold, but I slid into him hard. Neither one of us was speeding, but he was in the center of the road, and I wasn’t paying close attention.

    His bumper cover fell off – along with countless little plastic push fasteners – requiring $2000 worth of repairs. My Leaf took $4000 to repair. But running into a previously-unknown coworker was far more painful, and he barely concealed his anger at my mistake.

    Interestingly, traffic in the lot was subsequently changed to be counter-clockwise only, which would would have prevented the accident to begin with.

  • avatar

    “I like seeing my son while there’s still daylight outside, even in the winter.”

    Per your article last week, that makes you a loser! :(

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    My daily drive Chevy Avalanche has been rear-ended 3 times since October 2017, and less than 2 months getting it back, got custom fender work from someone in a parking lot.

    Had an Uber driver back out of a parking spot at ramming speed and slammed into my Avalanche on the rear wheel. Perfectly square on the rear wheel. Destroyed the rear bumper of the Prius, and appeared to leave me damage free – operative word there – appeared.

    Then 3 days later, an E-350 van backed into my Avalanche in a parking lot while I sat and watched in my backup camera at a dead stop. I even said out loud, “don’t hit me,” right before I laid on the horn but it was too late.

    Then 5 days after that, ANOTHER Uber driver hit me when I came to a stop in Seattle. I went to get out to see what the Hell happened and they drove off, with someone on the sidewalk saying, “they just hit your truck.”

    The only stroke of luck there was the hit was exactly in the same spot the E-350 hit me.

    Body damage was only $1500, and the insurance of the E-350 covered, no issues – but wait, it gets worse.

    Get the truck back and there is a massive water leak. Within days my carpet is soaked. Remember that first accident where the Uber driver hit me on the side wheel? Apparently, that flexed the body enough to pop a seam, which allowed water to gush into the cab. That repair was out of pocket, $576.

    Then two days ago, my wife asks me, “what happened to your truck?”

    “What do you mean what happened to my truck,” I asked?

    “There is a dent in your truck.”

    “What?”

    Go outside and sure enough, there is a nice crease in my passenger side rear fender, down low. The dent gets progressively worse as you get toward the end of the fender. Classic, pulling out of a parking spot, crease the side of the vehicle and drive off dent.

    God I hate driving in Seattle.

  • avatar
    Sigivald

    “at a fair rate of speed”

    Yes, I *am* going to pick this hill to die on.

    There is no “rate of speed”.

    There may be a “rate of travel”, distance/time, if one insists.

    We also call that “speed”, which is *inherently a rate, thus*.

    “A fair rate of speed” is just “fairly fast”, made confusing and overcomplicated.

    (It especially baffles me to see engineering types using “rate of speed”; if *anyone* should know better, it’d be them.)

    Now, if we mean “rate of change of speed”, that’s … well, deceleration or acceleration.

    (I mean, GOD. Even Jalopnik evidently got this right: https://jalopnik.com/stop-saying-rate-of-speed-1794417494)

  • avatar
    Danny

    In your experience, does the Challenger not feel as large and heavy to drive (compared to its competition) as the magazine articles suggest, or is the usable back seat your primary reason for choosing it over other powerful rwd coupes?

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      I think a lot of the griping about the size of the Chally comes from people who never drive large cars. It seems fine to me and I like the way it looks.

      • 0 avatar

        I had zero problem with the size and all of a problem with the rear visibility in the absence of backup camera.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          I just think they are boats. Which sums up my feelings about most anything bigger than a Golf.

          That said, I had a loaded (other than Hemi) 300C Platinum recently for a rental and I liked it. I currently have an Infinity Q50 as a rental and think it is a dog’s breakfast. Ugly and cramped inside, if OK looking on the outside. Though it is certainly fast.

          • 0 avatar

            Wonder if it has the Digital Suspension. If it rides like something cheap, it doesn’t.

            Check the trim alignment on the center stack. The Q50 RS was all sorts of wrong in that area.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    We’ve had countless parking lot incidents in the family:

    Ford 500: Wal Mart (of course) parking lot, someone backed into it and broke the AC. Not long after repairing the AC an xB ran a red and hit the Ford in a way that the frame broke, but no one was hurt.

    Dodge Neon: At a college an oversized Chevy SUV dug into the side of it, totalling the car. We bought it back and it drives fine, it just looks old, can’t complain though when insurance paid out $3000 for it (which is generous for a Neon!).

    Scion xB: This cars a magnet for incidents, one particular case had a hit and run at a drug store that left scratches on the side.

    My own Vic: Someone pulled up in a red SUV, door slams open into mine (thanks to wind), no damage done other than red paint on my trim (which I removed with lense polish).

  • avatar
    redapple

    My next 2nd car.
    $4000 pick up.
    Rail Road Ties for bumpers. Front and rear.

    YOu want to play [email protected]@ck? You came to the right place.

  • avatar
    redapple

    50 % of engineers leave the field within 5 years of graduating. They find they are not valued by the employer and the wage rate is watered down 30% due to H1-B flood.

    I was at Cummins HQ in Columbus IN at quitting time last year. As the hordes disgorged the building PROMPTLY at ‘quitting time,” I thought i was in Calcutta.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      It’s okay, Senator Hatch wants to double the current in-country headcount from 3 MILLION to six or more.

      What could go wrong?

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      That’s what happens when US employers cannot find qualified Americans to do those jobs. America has to import the labor.

      But things are changing. More employers from all over the planet are opening plants and opportunities in America and the demand for US labor is rising every day.

      That’s what happens when national economic policy and tax policy are changed to be more employer/industry-centric than welfare-recipient centric.

      Biggest problem I see is lack of qualified Americans to do the jobs in the future. BT (Before Trump) millions of high-paying job vacancies in America went unfilled because there weren’t enough Americans smart enough to do them.

      That hasn’t changed. Only thing that changed is that we now have even more job vacancies opening and still not enough qualified Americans to fill them.

      So we still have to LEGALLY import more labor.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I disagree, I see it more as wage dilution – esp from the “tech giants”.

        • 0 avatar
          Hydromatic

          Same here. If Corporate America wanted to, it could train and hire more American workers. But the catch is paying them a decent wage. This is where the H1-Bs start looking more and more attractive.

      • 0 avatar
        Sub-600

        Sen. Kamala Harris recently claimed that ending DACA would cost “thousands of teaching positions”. Is “school teacher” one of those jobs that “American’s just won’t do”?

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          School Teacher – depends WHERE. My district (roughly 12,000 students) currently has about 40 positions to fill.

          Why?

          Because it is easier to graduate college and move in with Mommy and Daddy than go out in the cold cruel world and find work that might be 500, 600, even 1000 miles from where you grew up!

          These “kids” today seem to think it beneath them to take a job to “get their feet” wet, give an impoverished community 3 or 5 or 10 years and then take that experience and find a job in the place they really want to be in.

          In my profession we DON’T want to spend the extra money to sponsor someone from out of the country, but when you’ve got NO choice. What are you going to do?

          Our jobs are posted online and we go to scads of college job fairs every spring, but still have trouble finding candidates.

          • 0 avatar
            Sub-600

            Wow, that’s interesting. I just assumed that teaching was a field where there were people competing for positions. Some districts, while the pay may be relatively low, have pretty good benefits. I live in one of the poorest districts in the country, the foreign born teachers here are necessary due to the fact that none of the kids speak English. The students are Hmong, Somali, Nigerian, Nepalese, etc. My neighbor’s a teacher, he’s in his twenties, nice guy. A high school teacher was stabbed here last year, assaults are common but mainly perpetrated by the indigenous population. Sad state of affairs.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I seem to recall your district is a bit out in the cut. Whiny snowflakes aside, I do see why some might hesitate. I suggest you sponsor a trip for prospective candidates to come out there so they can see your region is better than they might think.

            I’m not a teacher but even if I was and I was out of work the idea of going to play Breaking Bad the classroom edition out in NM doesn’t feel attractive to me. But, I’m probably being obtuse and in fact maybe the region has a lot to offer and I’m just ignorant? Perhaps so the candidates?

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            My larger point 28 is that the millennial’s have no interest in doing some hard lonely work for a few years to beef up their resumes until they can get that sweet assignment and stupid expensive apartment within walking distance of avocado toast.

            I came because I was desperate for work in the field I had spent 4 years and lots of borrowed money (that I was due to pay back) studying.

            I stayed but that doesn’t mean I expect them to. Give it a shot. Heck stay 5 years and you can get quite a bit of your loans forgiven.

            Then leave for wherever you think the promised land is.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Makes sense to me that a lot of Dreamers would end up wanting to teach.

          Our elected idiots in Congress really need to get over themselves and figure out a way to make these kids legal. Polls show an overwhelming majority of voters want it to happen. It should be a no-brainer for either party.

  • avatar
    05lgt

    Could not agree more with the priorities. As to how to view the action with a lime-green Chally, shouldn’t that be Sub-Lime? I’m old enough to think that’s what it’s supposed to be called. 392 RT with clutch and kid capable rear seat….

    Damn you. I most likely won’t, but … I’ll be thinking it for a while.

  • avatar
    dont.fit.in.cars

    “I like seeing my son while there’s still daylight outside, even in the winter.”

    Spending time in the arena of fatherhood…it makes all the difference.

  • avatar
    Tele Vision

    Driving an older car around can have benefits, as opined above. My ratty old SubHuman was nearly immune to door dings but extremely vulnerable to being boxed-in whilst parallel-parked. On one glorious Summer afternoon in downtown Calgary, on a busy shopping/bar/people-watching street, I had to engage 4-Low to push both the new Toyota Cressida in front of me forwards and, for good measure, the old Chevy 1/2 ton behind me backwards just so that I could get away from the curb. No real damage as both vehicles were parked within an inch of my bumpers. My then-girlfriend and I received polite applause from the several passersby as we effected the manouver and then very slowly pulled away, mostly because I was still in 4-Low.

  • avatar
    JREwing

    At least I’m not the only Accord owner out there whose rear bumper seems to be a magnet for this kind of stuff.

    My bumper showed signs of having been hit before when I bought the car, but it was easily ignored. Note to self: Insist on seeing the car in daylight, after all the snow has been washed off, before making an offer. Or, as I would later discover, after a rear-ending.

    A few months ago, I’m in the western Chicago ‘burbs and the person behind me bumps me after mis-calculating her stop. Then she just drive off like nothing happened! I flag down the Aurora PD and get her pulled over.

    Her license plate is crinkled up good, but the disinterested 20-something cop can’t find the damage on my car, and since it’s dark and wet, I give up hunting for it too quickly and let her drive off. I find the hole punched in my bumper, naturally, the following day. In daylight.

    So anyway, the cost of fixing the bumper is about my deductible. I haven’t come up with enough vanity to fix the bumper – and I suspect it’ll get hit again. Because, apparently, my Accord is a magnet.

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus

    I was working at a place that refurbished old oil rigs a few years back, and I had a 1999 Saturn SL to commute in. One day, a Mexican gentlemen (who spoke very little English) was backing into a spot. He got in the spot and I went to pull past, he pulled up (without looking forward) to straighten his car up and hit my car where the fender and passenger front door meet. This did some minor damage, even though it was plastic. That’s why they call it dent “resistant”, not dent proof.

    Anyway, he was also in a late 90s Saturn. I got out and looked, he looked at his car, which had no appreciable damage. I shook his hand, said something about we were both driving the same phucking car, to which he laughed, and I said don’t worry about it and got in my car and left.

    I was also surprised at myself for not being more upset by it. Maybe because I cared very little for the Saturn, or maybe because doing something about it would’ve been much more trouble than it was worth, I dunno. Sometimes, you gotta stand back and say “is this really worth raising hell over?” 9 times out of 10, its not.

  • avatar
    lon888

    People who have zero parking skills is why I carry an automatic center punch in my glove box. A shattered window on a rainy and/or very cold night really drives the point home.

  • avatar
    road_pizza

    There’s something to be said about driving an ’05 P71 for a DD :) …

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