By on February 1, 2017

Chevy SS Sometimes a manufacturer churns out a base trim that — all things considered — might just be the best choice for that particular model. Here’s a candidate.

The selection for this week’s Ace of Base will likely surprise approximately zero percent of our reading population, given my known affinity for larger-than-necessary engines and interiors which comfortably house Large Persons.

The General introduced the SS arguably as a mea culpa to American gearheads who pined for the dearly departed Pontiac G8 GT. We’ll simply gloss over the missed opportunity which was the G8 ST, an apple pie and bald eagle variant of the excellent Holden Ute in Australia, lest I start weeping onto my keyboard.

Under the hood of the SS is a barrel-chested 6.2-liter V8 engine, a small-block of near-legendary status thanks to its applications elsewhere in GM’s go-fast stable. Making 415 horsepower at 5,900 rpm and an equal amount of torque at 4,600 rpm, the SS should burn its way to 60 miles per hour from a standstill in under five seconds. This slingshots the SS from 0 to 60 in just 4.7 seconds. That’s Focus RS territory in a car weighing approximately as much as a Georgian castle and capable of shuttling four people around in stretch-out-your-legs comfort.

Four-pot Brembo brakes arrest the fun when Johnny Law pops into view over the horizon, and a dual-mode exhaust lets drivers uncork the big V8 for maximum aural attack. The usual grab-bag of infotainment goodies, electronic safety nannies, and bazillion-way power seats are on tap for the base price of $46,295. Nineteen-inch summer tires are standard, as is Magnetic Ride Control. It’s a remarkable amount of performance kit in a big sedan.

Go ahead and turn off the traction control with a long press of the button and drop the hammer, because no one is going to notice anyway. Somnambulant styling assures drivers’ anonymity, leaving them free to enjoy the all-American (Australian?) grunt. I can’t even say this is a wolf in sheep’s clothing. It’s more of a wolf in a plain brown box.

Selecting the six-speed manual transmission guarantees more grins and also nets buyers a shorter (numerically higher) 3.70 rear-end gear, ensuring quicker stoplight getaways. Choose any color you want other than orange for $0. Ignore the optional sunroof which simply serves to rob headroom and raise the center of gravity. The full-sized spare can stay in GM’s warehouse, too. In terms of options, that’s about it.

While this rear-drive, manually shifted sedan will run away from many other performance machines, it can’t outrun its stupid name. SS should most decidedly be a trim level, not a model designation. The SS should have been called the Chevelle. Or the Nova. Why GM’s marketing mavens didn’t dip into their grab bag of excellent (and appropriate) names from the past is well beyond my level of comprehension.

I think its lackluster styling and name contributed to fewer than 10,000 units departing dealer lots since it went on sale in the second half of calendar year 2013. Selling at the rate of glacier progression, this assures drivers won’t see themselves at every street corner. I do think these things will eventually appreciate in value and will bring good money at Barrett-Jackson in thirty years’ time, especially manual-transmission examples.

In the here and now, though, grab one while you can. They’re slated to go out of production later in 2017.

Not every base model has aced it. The ones which have? They help make the automotive landscape a lot better. Any others you can think of, B&B? Let us know in the comments. Naturally, feel free to eviscerate our selections.

The model above is shown in American dollars, absent of destination and other fees. As always, your dealer may sell for less … especially if it’s an outgoing model that has been welded to dealer lots since its introduction.

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120 Comments on “Ace of Base: 2017 Chevrolet SS...”


  • avatar
    legacygt

    There’s anonymous that goes unnoticed. And then there’s anonymous that is just a turn-off. In the case of the SS, I’d say it’s more of the latter. I remember seeing this car on the show stand the first time it appeared at the NY Auto Show and nobody was even looking at it. At the other end of the room was a row of Sonics that had a huge crowd looking them over. You cannot design your performance flagship to be less interesting looking than your entry in the compact class.

    • 0 avatar
      arach

      Anytime I bring this up I tend to get hammered with “Its a sleeper. People love sleepers”.

      If anything, this is a case study in proving the fact that people don’t love sleepers… especially not people putting 50gs down on a car.

      I was a “near SS buyer”. I literally sat there in the dealership asking them if they had body kits or ANYTHING to make the car look like something other than a Malibu. You see, I didn’t want to drive a Malibu.

      I mean everything else was PERFECT, exactly what I wanted, but it didn’t look fun or exciting. Didn’t seem special in any way. Just looks like a normal big ‘ol sedan.

      I combed the aftermarket. Very few options, maybe import a bumper from Australia? couldn’t tell if it would fit for sure and it was going to cost as much as a spare miata.

      So I didn’t do it.

      Market success though supports that its not just “me” that felt that way.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        I have seen a few SS in the wild but yes, only if I really concentrate.

        “Why does that Malibu have chrome side-vents? Oh wait that’s an SS.”

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        I just don’t get this meme and never have.

        The Malibu has a short hood, a long front overhang, usually wears 17s, sits pretty high, and doesn’t make any noise to speak of. It looks like any other transverse-engined midsize sedan.

        The SS has a long hood, a short front overhang, wears 19s, sits very low to the ground, and is the loudest sedan short of an E63 AMG. It looks every bit the part of a proper RWD sports sedan.

        To mistake one for the other you’d have to be blind.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          is the loudest sedan short of an E63 AMG

          Sorry Sir my daily driver is well insulated enough that I do not have to subject myself to the exhaust noises of other vehicles, short of a non-stock Harley Davidson.

          Would you care for any Grey Poupon?

        • 0 avatar
          arach

          I drive a yellow Ferrari.

          MY mother literally pointed at a yellow Saturn SL2 and said, “Look! Another Ferrari just like yours”

          Now I understand my mother is a little older, but you are clearly an enthusiast. The average person can’t tell the difference between a ford taurus and a Chevrolet Malibu, but the SS doesn’t have anything that makes it “obvious” its something special. It doesn’t communicate “Sports car” or “Sports sedan”. To 99% of the population, its just another sedan like a malibu.

  • avatar
    ItsJustaRide

    This is an uncommon car with few options.

    While the full size spare is somewhat dear at $500, adding it is a no-brainer if you’re contemplating the SS as a future collectible / auction star.

    Besides, selecting the 6MT saves you $300 over the slushbox, so it’s really just $200 to further increase resale with the spare.

    • 0 avatar
      arach

      The real magic was 2015 though.. For some reason in 2015 the manual was about $1500 cheaper than the Auto, but in 2016 the Manual shot up by 1500.

      I dont understand why it didn’t have the Gas Guzzler tax in 15 but did in 16.

    • 0 avatar
      la834

      It’s difficult to predict the relative future collectible value of manual vs. automatic transmissions. Manuals for a long time brought a premium due to faster acceleration and greater driver involvement, but these days automatics are often faster. My real concern though is that 20 years from now few people will know how to drive a stick given the number of cars offering them continue to decline, and many will prefer a slushbox for that reason. Already automatic-equipped muscle cars that were long frowned upon have gained value relative to manual versions of the same car.

      • 0 avatar
        ItsJustaRide

        As what you say concerning the ubiquity of slushboxes is likely to be the case, the collectors will prefer the MT cars simply b/c of their relative rarity.

  • avatar
    energetik9

    The styling is just too, well, unnoticeable. It faces the same challenges that the Pontiac GTO faced. To 99% of the US population is looks just like any other standard GM sedan, which arguably are somewhat plain also. It might be harder to spot for the average driver than the unicorn that is the Mercedes AMG C63 wagon.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    I love these cars! A friend has one and enjoys the heck out of it.

    I am not sure how the styling can be anything other than what it is, anonymous. To me, that is the charm of this ride. No one sees it coming, they hear it though.. The biggest downfall is the Australian dollar, which is what this car is made in, which made it a tad too expensive here in the states. If it were produced here, and the price point kept 15% lower ala Camaro pricing it would have flown from the shelves. The charger, unfortunately is better financially.

    When GM ran the 20% off sale, what little inventory their was decreased rapidly. They may be stacking up now, but wait for the July 4 2017 summer sale, if you can find one 20% off MSRP you are in great shape.

  • avatar
    cognoscenti

    I seriously considered one, and could actually get a good price – but ultimately it was the fear over parts availability that scared me off. The G8 was produced in significantly higher numbers, and those owners are already facing that problem!

  • avatar
    Zackman

    Well, all I can say is that it’s not quite “ace of base”. After all, it does have chrome door handles. :-)

    “SS” what?
    Impala SS? Nope.
    Malibu SS? Nope.
    Cruze SS? Nope.
    Sonic SS? Ha ha…
    Schutzstaffel? Hmmm…

    During my last dealership visit for an oil change, I overheard a conversation of a Pontiac G8 (V8) owner speaking with a salesman about trading his in for an SS. I don’t know how high the mileage was on his Pontiac, but apparently it was up there and beginning to give him some problems.

    He kept going on and on praising the merits of his hot rod and how much fun it was for him to tear up the roads. He wasn’t a young man, either – perhaps around my age or slightly younger, but in his 50s at least.

    I wasn’t around to hear or see the results of that conversation, but my Chevy dealer had several SS examples for sale and I’m almost certain that man took one home with him.

    The SS doesn’t have any appeal to me, let alone the fuel cost to drive it, no matter what the door handles look like!

  • avatar
    Jethrow

    So just saying, and maybe it’s because I am Australian, but I really like the look of the SS. Seriously guys, are we buying a muscle car or a handbag? I leave the bling to the wife, and just enjoy me some understated, but smartly styled big, roomy, V8, RWD sedan.

    Sure, maybe the smaller, FWD, four pots are prettier, but really? I thought you was all car guys, not hipster wannabees, with your matching earings ….

    Just saying.

    PS. Maybe in Australia we prefer substance over style.

    • 0 avatar
      TonyJZX

      One of the problems going forward would be parts pricing for the US.

      Sure its no problem in its home country because these things will be stacked high at the wreckers given that 300hp to 400hp available cheaply in rwd usually means they are driven hard and often into object meaning parts are cheap.

      One other model that is cheap is the huge numbers of Caprice service cars.

      If you want a Caprice V8 for less than $10,000 then you are in for an embarrassment of riches. Apparently low mileage 2 ton sub 20mpg cars that dominate a parking space arent too popular.

      They used to be popular with heads of state, not anymore, its all about BMW armored.

    • 0 avatar
      Jimal

      G8 owner here, and I agree with you. I like the way the SS looks. My buddy had an newer STI and currently drives an RS4, and he gets a lot of unwanted attention. My G8 can crush most regular cars on the road and no one gives it a second look.

    • 0 avatar
      Zackman

      “Sure, maybe the smaller, FWD, four pots are prettier, but really? I thought you was all car guys, not hipster wannabees, with your matching earrings ….”

      Ha ha! Please notice I corrected your spelling of “earrings”.

      I don’t know how many hipsters are on here, but I’m not one of them, and many others are not as well, so be careful what you assume based on your real or imagined vision of how much of a “man” or “car-guy” you are!

      For the record, I’m not a high-performance guy because a hi-po vehicle is generally not a comfortable place to be as a daily driver, and I’m sure the SS falls into that category. Plus, I don’t have the income to support such a car. However, my 2012 Impala does have 300 hp and is by far the fastest, most powerful car I have ever owned, but it is not a high-performance car by any standard, but it sure goes like stink when I mash the gas!

      Please look around and make sure the car you are driving isn’t a 1961 Ford Falcon, that you are not at Starbucks on your Apple, and take a glance in a mirror confirming your man-bun isn’t out of place and your earrings match!

      Gainful employment?

      Just joking, of course.

    • 0 avatar
      OldManPants

      “Maybe in Australia we prefer substance over style.”

      Maybe in Australia you should avoid trying to mimic American redneck patois. Your comment sounds like a dude of the ranch variety.

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      No one is arguing substance, although it should be noted that there are very capable competitors to this car, but here’s the problem. As noted, parts, so I won’t dwell on that. Two (and this is just my opinion) is that GM named it the “SS”, which is historically a package designation, not a unique model. I suspect that when some people see it, they think it is just a special edition of a regular sedan. Combine that with the fact that GM barely advertised this car and it is not noticeable on the road and you get a large percentage of the car population that has no idea the car even exists. GM has only sold 8300 of these over the past three years. Even the Smart car sold at 2x the rate of the SS in 2016.

      • 0 avatar
        Jimal

        I agree with you on the name; I never really cared for the use of “SS” as a model name in and of itself.

        As far as sales go, the SS did exactly what Chevrolet (and GM) wanted it to do, as indicated by the lack of marketing for the model. The sole purpose of the SS was to allow GM Australia to maintain some tax breaks offered by the government before GM shuddered Pontiac.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      “Maybe in Australia we prefer substance over style.”

      Or maybe in Australia, you prefer to buy Australian cars.

      And there’s plenty of substance AND style in the Dodge Charger.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        “Or maybe in Australia, you prefer to buy Australian cars.”

        Apparently not. There won’t be any cars produced there after the end of this year, unless you count the after-market conversion of a few Ford pickups from left- to right-hand drive.

        Some of the top sellers include the Toyota Hilux, Mazda 3 and Hyundai i30 (what we call an Elantra). Tariff reductions killed off the locals.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          For a long time, though, they did, PCH. Australian car tastes are rather unique, from what I can see.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            The local car seems pretty good when the imported alternative is slapped with a 25-50% tariff.

            Australia had a protected market for decades. The domestic market tanked when those protections were phased out. They bought local because they didn’t have much choice. They stopped buying local when they could afford to.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            True, but Australians had some quirky local tastes that brands like Holden and Ford catered to, like hot-rod V-8 family sedans, (like this SS), and modern-day El Caminos.

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holden_Commodore_(VE)#/media/File:2009-2010_Holden_VE_Ute_(MY10)_SV6_01.jpg

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            A company operating in a low-volume protected market is going to be inclined to have a single platform and milk it for everything that it’s worth in order to amortize costs over low sales volumes.

            So you end up with a car that serves in various forms as a family car, performance car, wagon, coupe, cop car, taxi, government fleet vehicle and even pickup. It’s the cheapest way to create variety.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Right…but there’s a reason why they built hot-rod family haulers with big stonkin’ V8s and modern day El Caminos for Australians…there was a demand for them. There isn’t much of a market for either here.

            Like I said…Australians have some unique automotive tastes. They’re allowed.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            The point is that nobody is going to build a Corvette or 911 especially for Aussies. They’re going to get a normal car with a big motor because that’s the only way to get a performance car in a protected market with limited choices.

            When the price of imports fell, they started buying imports. The demand for local cars was artificially supported by trade barriers. They bought local because they didn’t have much choice. The Aussies are getting rid of local production because not many people really want it when given the choice.

            You may as well argue that East Germans loved Trabants because they were relatively common. You may notice that the Trabant lost whatever market it had when it became possible to buy something else.

            In any case, the performance cars were never that popular; as has been the case here, they have been a niche market. Most of the Falcons and Commodores were pretty vanilla, such as my own Ford Falcon (that got no respect from local mechanics who were happy to list all of the things that sucked about them.)

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          Pch,
          What you state is true, except with your usual style you omit, understate and overstate.

          Auto manufacturing has moved on and out to the benefit of the country. The country will profit immensely from this move.

          Australia is one of the best countries globally in design and engineering of all vehicles. This has remained, with Ford, GM and Toyota. The benefit is the design and engineering jobs are high paying and value.

          Why do we want the equivalent of workers, ie, American Axle on wages from $10ph? Is this advancing a country?

          From your comments it appears your support for low paying jobs to challenge Mexico and China will reduce tje standard of living for your fellow Americans.

          But, like all good Socialist Elite wanna be’s you are arrogant by making and sucking the life out of the lower and middle class

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        The Charger is godawfully ugly. I can’t get past how the front and rear doorhandles don’t line up. Even beyond that, the shape of the greenhouse is a turnoff and the taillights look like Pep Boys from the factory. The SS (not to mention the Chrysler 300) is far better looking.

    • 0 avatar
      arach

      We like substance and Style.

      I went to school in Australia. I can’t tell you how many of my Australian Friends oogled at my Camaro SS when I first got it. I hear cars like that are real pricing over there, but here anyone with a minimum wage job can buy one.

      You could have a Corvette for the price of an SS. You could have a V6 AND a V8 Camaro for the price of an SS.

      I won’t say its not an awesome car, but its a very pricey car, costing more than 2x the price of a normal car. It costs more than a BMW, Cadillac, Audi, or Mercedes. At that price people expect it to look the part too.

    • 0 avatar
      WawaHoagies

      So you need a vanilla-styled sedan to feel like a man… A bit insecure are we?

      Luckily, I don’t share your self-imposed restrictions and I’ll stick with my “smartly styled” Mustang.

  • avatar
    True_Blue

    “Why GM’s marketing mavens didn’t dip into their grab bag of excellent (and appropriate) names from the past is well beyond my level of comprehension.”

    They may still be smarting from renaming the Monaro into a Pontiac GTO. Hell, Chrysler still faces blowback from naming the four-door LX a “Charger.”

    However, Chevelle would have been quite fitting.

    • 0 avatar
      Compaq Deskpro

      I use to defend their decision to call a sedan a Charger, but now I own a Challenger, and everyone calls it a “Dodge Charger”. I would be fine with Chrysler giving it the Cutlass treatment and calling them both a Charger, no need to explain.

    • 0 avatar
      John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

      Agreed. Chevelle is the obvious choice.

      As for the Charger being a four door, its still better than the FWD POS that wore the name in the 80s. Anybody with the notion that all Chargers before the modern sedan were wonderful and special and are therefore tarnished due to it now being a seda need only to go to Wikipedia and see what I’m talking about.

      After seeing that horrible thing, a sedan that looks [email protected]§§, is RWD and offers a V-8 won’t seem so bad.

      Besides, Gibbs even made a 2nd gen Intrepid and Stratus look kinda cool. The Charger is far beyond those awful things.

  • avatar
    OldManPants

    Styling is Chevy channeling the Ford 500. I like it.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    I am wondering, if I get one now/this year, will I be able to make $$ on it, lets say, in 5 years?

  • avatar
    LS1Fan

    A 4 door,V8 powered RWD sedan with a Chevy badge and parts availability of a 10 year old AMG was never destined to be a bestseller.

    • 0 avatar
      zamoti

      This is why I sold my S55. It was fun and fast, but getting parts was a huge pain in the arse. Had to wait three days for a special clip for a fuel damper and the car could not be driven else it would spew gas everywhere without it.
      Fast is fun, but when your car is up on stands for a week at a time waiting for a part, there’s no fast and no fun.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I suspect what really hurt this car was the styling. Let’s face it – it’s a hot rod, and people who buy hot rods want one that looks hot. This one isn’t. Probably explains why the Charger ate its’ lunch.

  • avatar
    Corey Lewis

    True/False:

    They’d have sold many more if they pitched as an exotic sporty import, and left it styled and badged as Holden.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      False. They’d have sold lots more of them if it had butch retro styling, like a Charger. Basically, this is a hot rod, and it needed to look the part.

      Basically, this works out to a contemporary version of something like a 2000 BMW 540 – the “suave bullet sedan”. And there’s still a market for a sedan like that. But the folks who want cars like that don’t want budget, zero-prestige makes like Chevy.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    The G8 was part of Bob Lutz’s dream to reinvent Pontiac as GM’s BMW. That didn’t last long.

    The SS was an attempt to unload Holden’s excess production, a goal that quickly became irrelevant once GM decided to shut down its Australian assembly.

    There was never any real commitment to this car, and I would hate to own one when the time comes to find parts for it.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Probably that, and I’m sure Chevy was noticing how many Chargers Dodge was selling, and decided to test the waters.

      • 0 avatar
        Jimal

        Not in the slightest. Pch101 nailed it. I haven’t had problems finding parts for my G8… yet. The fleet Caprice PPV helps, as does the previous generation Camaro to a certain extent. I am trying to get some maintenance and upgrades done sooner rather than later.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Freedmike,
        True. Also the HSV challenges the likes of M and AMG in the UK.

        I don’t think is entirely accurate regarding Holden’s production capacity.

        I mean, it is a given that the SS was exported to the SS because there was capacity. Any dimwit would see this.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      All true, but I still like its looks and substance.

    • 0 avatar
      LS1Fan

      “BMW-Izing” Pontiac shows just how little Bob Lutz understood the divisions purpose or BMWs customer base.

      Pontiac was never about foreign car performance benchmarks. It was about selling overstyled, differentiated versions of plebeian family cars.Pontiac was the option when you wanted a Corvette but needed a family sedan and couldn’t stomach a boring Accord. The go-fast nature of some of the cars wasn’t about beating foreign cars on a track.

      Further ,BMW sells on prestige,not Nurburgring lap times. By the time Lutz took over Pontiac only had a premium image in the subprime auto market. Those factors are why credible performance cars like the G8 and GTO flopped, and the attempt to reinvent the division at the last hour failed.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Nice post, but personally I never saw BMW as prestigious I saw it as a true enthusiast sports brand complete with ride, handling, power and proper weight distribution. In my mind, Mercedes sold more on prestige.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          BMW tried to sell cars on that basis for many years and kept getting outcompeted by Mercedes and then Lexus.

          When they gave up pretensions of being satisfying to enthusiasts for all but a few of their cars, volume exploded.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Interesting. So how did BMW suddenly go from “enthusiast” to “prestigious” badge/brand? This is the 64,000 dollar question.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @28

            “Interesting. So how did BMW suddenly go from “enthusiast” to “prestigious” badge/brand? This is the 64,000 dollar question.”

            Two things happened:
            1) The market changed. Prior to the ’80s, luxury was all about styling and gadgetry. Traditional American luxury cars – think Town Car, DeVille – didn’t drive all that differently than the downmarket family sedans they were based on. And that had been the case for probably 30 years or so.

            2) Younger buyers in the 1980s and 1990s were far more concerned with actual value for dollar, versus flash and gadgetry. The hot buttons were workmanship, safety, and performance.

            The average BMW (or Mercedes, or Audi, or Saab, or Volvo) offered vastly superior performance and quality to any domestic luxury car. Older buyers probably didn’t care, but younger ones did.

            In other words, performance, engineering and quality became prestigious because the older prestige items – things like a soft ride, lots of power toys, and gimmicky styling – were, essentially, bulls**t games played to get people to pay Cadillac prices for a Chevy Caprice.

            What’s a luxury car buyer after today, now that pretty much everything on the market is screwed together and performs as well as something like an early-’90s 3-series? It’s lifestyle, I’d say.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            I think it became primarily a prestige brand in most consumers’ eyes when the E30 became the official car of the “yuppie” phenomenon in the mid-’80s.

            But the cars were louder, harder-riding, and not as nice inside as the competition, so those buyers weren’t totally happy with them.

            Base trims of the E46, E90, and F30 each evolved further in the direction of soft and cushy, and each sold better than the last. Same story with the second generations of both X5 and X3.

          • 0 avatar
            Corey Lewis

            I was under the impression that Mercedes of the ’80s were seen as more “starchy,” for the older crowd, less fun, and (probably importantly) much more expensive. The only thing resembling something affordable at the time was the 190E, and that was pretty boring.

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            Back in the ’80s, Mercedes was for people who wanted to look respectable (whether they were or not), and BMWs were for people who were @$$holes and proud of it. Alec Baldwin’s character in Glengarry Glen Ross “drove a $80,000 BMW”, but Mitch and Murray probably had S-classes in their garages.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        Lutz worked at BMW, and I suspect that he wanted to elevate Pontiac’s status in order to raise its price point and make it financially viable.

        It wasn’t a bad idea in theory, but the brand was already badly damaged and the cars were not up to the task, so the odds of success were low.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Parts? I know you are quite challenged. Are you that simple?

  • avatar
    ptschett

    It’s a neat car and I’m glad they brought it here, but I think I’d rather have the Charger Scat Pack if I need 4 doors and >400 HP.

    • 0 avatar
      Loser

      Agree. I looked both the SS and Charger, liked them both but the Dodge was cheaper and more power. Color selection was very limited on the SS also. I hate to see the SS go.

  • avatar
    jack4x

    The car has a presence on the road that is not easily captured in pictures or even the bright lights of an auto show. I get a lot of comments at gas stations along the lines of

    “I have no idea what that is but it looks awesome”

    A lot of thumbs up on the road. A few knowing glances from those who actually recognize it. With aftermarket exhaust it’s got a mean rumble that no one mistakes for a Malibu or Impala.

    I agree the name is dumb. Should have been Caprice SS or Commodore SS.

    As far as slow sales, GM sold exactly as many as they wanted to. The car was a bone thrown to US enthusiasts to use up spare production down under. That was why it was never advertised, they knew word of mouth and magazine reviews would give them all the buzz they needed to sell 3000/year.

    • 0 avatar
      derekson

      They should’ve just branded it as the Chevelle SS, despite the 4 doors, like Dodge did with the Charger.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        GM sold exactly as many as they wanted to.

        +1 If GM had actually wanted to sell them they would have set up production stateside, called it the Impala, and had a full line of sedans. (A V6 base model, a midrange V8 model automatic only, and a the fire-breathing SS version with V8 and manual transmission standard.)

      • 0 avatar
        DC Bruce

        Make that “Chevelle SS 396,” which was an awesome car in its day (1966). I know, the cubes don’t quite add up to 396 . . . but close enough for government work.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @jack4x
      Now GM in Australia is facing maybe total wipeout, when the current stocks of the Commodore finish. Very dumb decision and equally dumb decisions, by local politicians, GMNA and the lastly the buying public

      • 0 avatar
        John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

        Yep, everybody is wrong but you and your alter ego, bafo.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        RobertRyan,
        I do believe GMH has a future. As we are seeing many are moving to pickups, SUVs and CUVs.

        GMH has been slow to the party realising this. GMH needs a better line up to offer consumer expectations.

        Ford and Toyota are reading the Aussie market better than GM.

        The removal of a heavily taxpayer subsidised industry made sense, especially considering our high wages and work conditions.

        Leave other countries to subsidise their vehicle industry. This means every vehicle we import a taxpayer from another country has subsidised our purchase.

        Its a win win for us. We don’t subsidise a few thousand bucks per car and the importing country subsidises a few thousand per vehicle.

        We don’t need to compete with lower wafe and standard of living countries. Lets concentrate in designing and engineering successful platforms.

        How many architects have a better life than the carpenters building their homes? Same, same here.

  • avatar
    davefromcalgary

    “The full-sized spare can stay in GM’s warehouse, too.”

    Cant agree with this advise.

  • avatar
    arach

    I think this is kind of a cheater “Ace of Base”.

    There is only one trim option. OK sure you can get a sunroof or you can get a spare tire, but do those really count as trims? All options together add about 2% of the base models price?

    There is no “Base” SS. It just comes fully loaded to all who buy it….

    Why doesn’t the Ferrari LaFerrari win the “Ace of Base”

    The base version of that car is really impressive….

  • avatar
    ajla

    Should I buy one of these this fall?

    I feel like it’s either this or the G80 unless I go with a used car.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I don’t know if I’d talk you out of either one, but if this is a 10-year car for you, I’d stick with the Genesis. I have a feeling parts availability here might be iffy.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      That’s an odd set of finalists. This is a performance machine that’s indifferent to luxury. The G80 is a luxury machine that’s indifferent to performance.

      • 0 avatar
        Corey Lewis

        The best compromise is something with luxury and performance, the Q70 5.6.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        “That’s an odd set of finalists”

        There aren’t many V8 RWD sedans left.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          “There aren’t many V8 RWD sedans left.”

          There are two at your friendly neighborhood Dodge/Chrysler dealer…but I don’t know if I’d want to do anything but lease either one.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            I already have a 2014 Charger RT. It is a fun car but the ownership experience has been disappointing enough that I’m wanting to take a break from FCA for awhile.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Then FCA shall be banished.

            I haven’t seen any tests on a G80 V-8. Has anyone?

          • 0 avatar
            Corey Lewis

            Here’s one that’s probably crap quality.
            http://www.tflcar.com/2016/09/2017-genesis-g80-5-0-ultimate-test-drive-review/

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            That intro sentence would have earned me unending scorn from my j-school prof…

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          I know number of cylinders is very important to you, but I can’t help but think you’d like your choices better if you were willing to consider forced-induction sixes.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            I’m not totally opposed to a turbo-6 (turbo-4 yes), but not too many of them appeal to me. The C43 is AWD only and the Q50 Red Sport sounds like a food processor.

            The CTS V-Sport, ATS-V, XF, or GS450h is a possibility on the used side but I honestly think I’d still lean to Corey’s Q70 idea in that situation.

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        It may be indifferent and not the car’s primary mission, but the SS does have some nice features standard: nav, heads up display, good stereo, ventilated seats, etc. The seats are comfy and it rides pretty nice with the MRC.

        I haven’t driven a G80 to compare, but the SS is no penalty box (and definitely no G8)

        Of course in this class, the clutch pedal is the biggest luxury of all….

    • 0 avatar
      arach

      I was in the same boat as you… so I don’t think its crazy at all. I test drove both and investigated both.

      But I thought I’d share with you what I came up with.

      I think the SS is a MUCH better car, IF you can stomach a “chevy” with a sleeper look. Its that simple. If you can’t get over the “Chevy” name and/or the “Sleeper Look” then the G80 is a better bet.

      But let me also tell you something frustrating about the Genesis. There’s something wrong with it. Yes, I know, its “awesome” on paper, Reliability isn’t bad, repair is solid. thats why I decided I was going to buy a G80…

      That was until I actually drove it.

      You see, the thing I love about BMWs is you don’t have to look at the stats, you have to drive them. The torque curves are right, the transmission tuning is right… They typically drive very well.

      This is where I had a minor issue with the cadillac. On paper, it outperformed the BMW, but it just didn’t feel right. The torque was at too high of RPMs, and the transmission tuning left to off shifts.

      The G80 is the Cadillac of the mid 2000s. What I mean by that is on paper, it is the absolute BEST value you can get with your hard earned dollar. But two issues emerge:
      1. The brand. I love hyundai and in my fleet of cars own one… but resale is awful largely because aspirational buyers don’t reach for Hyundais (or in this case the Genesis)
      2. The Car. Yes, on paper it is amazing, but you get in it, and I couldn’t help but think “What the Heck”? Say you gas it at 40 MPH to pass someone. It bogs down, and you sit there waiting for it to downshift for you, and it doesn’t… until that last possible moment when you start thinking its broken or something. And that is kind of the essence of the G80. It ticks all the right boxes, but misses all the greyspace in between. It’ll drag a quartermile fine, but it won’t downshift to pass. It has all the creature comforts, but they aren’t quite rationally ergonomic. It has all the tech, but it doesn’t quite work seemlessly.

      I have great expectations for Genesis… And I love the brand and the products… but the price jump for the new Genesis brand cut the value proposition the old Genesis and Equus offered just enough that I thought it was worth paying more for something else. I think it needs another generation to “be there”, just like Cadillac did.

      If I can summarize it in one thing I told the Genesis Salesman: “I drove the G80, and then I drove the Sonata 2.0t Limited. Probably no one has ever told you this before, but the Sonata drives better, and that’s irrespective of its price”

      And if Brand/Flashiness aren’t your thing, the SS is going to be just as luxurious, with more power and performance, and with less quirks.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    What a weird choice for Ace of Base. This is a car that only comes fully loaded and is priced to reflect that. The base models, not available here, have a 3.0 V6, cloth upholstery, and basic infotainment.

  • avatar
    pb35

    The vanity plate on my ’15 SS is NAMELSS. I love it and want to trade it for…another SS.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      You named your SS after a late-’90s Oldsmobile?

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      Why trade? What does the ’16 or ’17 have that yours doesn’t?

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        Dual mode mufflers, new front fascia/hood vents, different wheels, and new paint colors. The new exhaust sounds better if you stay stock, but a lot of owners upgrade anyways. The other changes are pretty minor unless you’re really looking for them.

      • 0 avatar
        pb35

        I want the manual in Regal Peacock Green and the dual mode exhaust. Mine is black which wasn’t my first choice. It’s ok, my wife would probably scalp me if I wanted to trade my car again. The SS just turned 1 the other day.

        I’m not sure I get the late 90s Oldsmobile reference?

  • avatar
    CarnotCycle

    I agree with other folks here it should be a Caprice SS. Which also makes me wonder why cops haven’t taken to this car, and GM hasn’t pitched a cop version.

    Big, bland, simple, fast. Cops love all those things for their rides.

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      They kind of do, the Caprice PPV, not sold to the general public. It’s a stretched wheelbase version of the last generation Commodore (Pontiac G8). Cloth seats, 6.0 instead of the LS3, column shift. Simple and fast as you said.

      Since the SS was always going to be low volume, GM only sold well equipped models, which is why this Ace of Base has heated/ventilated seats, heads up display, nav, etc that cops don’t want to pay for.

  • avatar
    slingshot

    I have never seen one on the road. I saw one at the NY Auto show three years ago. I was really interested in this car when the announcement was made several years ago. However, its a big but not an especially attractive car. It has a gas guzzling engine when there were better V-8 alternatives, a high price, sub par reliability and there will be difficulty obtaining parts. Other than that its great. Of course, if I could buy one for a low price, I might reconsider. I would need another car as a back-up.

    I had a VW Rabbit forty years ago and I remember waiting four weeks to get some part from Germany; it was a total piece of crap by the way. Fortunately, I was traveling every week and I was able to work around it.

  • avatar
    Corey Lewis

    Lookie here. 2016 SS manual.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/2016-Chevrolet-SS-Sedan-4-Door-/322404504549

  • avatar
    John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

    I love this car. Or at least, the idea of it. I haven’t driven one, but everything I’ve read on it seems fine to me.

    Just wish it had a real name. They have Chevelle in their filing cabinet, why not use it here? I’ll never understand it.

    Nova? Let’s not forget that was a budget model, especially the last one, having been a rebadged FWD Corolla.

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