By on February 26, 2015

TTAC commentator Land Ark writes:

Hello again Sajeev!

Before my new Honda question, just an update on the issue you helped me with previously. Short answer: I sold the Civic and made a few hundred bucks. The more I looked into it, the more I started to come to the realization that there likely was nothing wrong with the AC system, it was just not a good system.

On to my new question:

My coworker, who drives cars into the ground, recently lost his high mile 2006 Caravan to an accident. He asked me for some advice then ventured out on his own and bought a new van; a 2006 Honda Odyssey with 71k miles. As soon as I saw it I cringed.

When I first saw him that morning I mentioned the, ummm,  concern I would have buying a V6 Honda of that generation. Namely the transmission issues. He respects my opinion and knowledge of such matters and started doing his own digging and has come to the conclusion that he needs to sell it and get something else (it still has temporary tags on it).

I feel terrible, as I realize not ALL Odysseys will succumb to transmission problems. But at the same time, I don’t know the best way to put it into perspective. So my question is, what is the known failure rate of 2006(-ish) trannys? Is it simply a case of only reading about people mentioning their broken cars and never about cars that are running fine?

He got a pretty good deal on it and other than the trans I wouldn’t have any concerns. And since he keeps cars for a really long time I have greater concerns than the average car buyer. So what do we think?

Sajeev answers:

Oh boy, it’s been a while since we did an HTF, a Honda Transmission FAIL.

There was a recall for 2004-older models, even if not everyone is thrilled with it. And it’s less than reassuring when you Google up “OdysseyTransmission.com” with a collection of 2006 Odyssey owners’ complaints. But is that really the point?

Any used minivan could have a failing tranny: these machines are designed to handle a certain load with their high horsepower V6s, but their trasnsaxles (and cooling systems) are often marginal as they are based on a car. But their owners are more than willing to exceed that need, car-DNA weak links be damned.

If this Odyssey has clean ATF in the unit, will another minivan in his price range be any better? Maybe he should install some aftermarket coolers (a la YouTube video above) and call it done. This Odyssey is one of the nicer used minivans, fit and finish wise. And that’s a sweet lookin’ pair of custom made coolers in the conversion kit. No chintzy zip-tie things for this YouTube guy!

Capture

boing! (photo courtesy: YouTube)

Tthat’s a tough question.  You won’t see me guessing on this one…son!

Send your queries to [email protected]com. Spare no details and ask for a speedy resolution if you’re in a hurry…but be realistic, and use your make/model specific forums instead of TTAC for more timely advice.

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57 Comments on “Piston Slap: Even More Honda Slushbox FAIL?...”


  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    I think the 2005+ 2nd gen Odysseys have a MUCH lower failure rate than the first gen cars, but the damage to reputation had been done. I think complaints about the 2nd gen Odyssey transmissions center around how the torque converter is programmed to lock up a bit early, and causes some unpleasant vibrations/sounds.

    Sajeev is right though, ALL fwd based minivans put a lot of stress on their transaxles, its endemic to the segment. Why super beefy transmission coolers don’t come from the factory on all of these boggles my mind.

    My old 929-based MPV (longitudinally mounted v6, solid rear axle, part time 4wd with locking center diff) had a Jatco (shared with Nissan, as seen on pathfinder, 300zx, others), and had a towing package from the factory with a heavy duty transmission and engine oil cooler. 165k and still going strong as a secondary vehicle with my parents, lots of overloaded camping trips, fire wood hauling. My brother has a well worn 89′ rwd with the 2.6 4 banger hooked up to the same automatic, 230k miles on the original transmission, albeit with some slip and finicky torque converter lockup in the past few years.

    • 0 avatar

      First generation here with 180,000 miles and still going, not without a few hard shifts once in a while.

    • 0 avatar
      immortalsix

      FWIW, I had a 2006 Odyssey, whose transmission started shuddering under load at about 110K. Sho nuf.

      Ended up fully dead and really killing my trade-in value. Bad times.

      So, from my perspective, 100% of 2005+ Odyssey transmissions in my sample have died. But on a serious note, I wouldn’t say the issue is resolved in the 2005+ vans.

      I’m glad the failure rate is supposedly much lower (source?), but I’m still too gun-shy to buy another Odyssey (which I loved when it was working).

      Wife is currently sporting a Volvo wagon and vainly trying to pretend that it holds a candle to sliding doors for kid patrol.

  • avatar
    Rday

    Have a 2006 Ridgeline with the same transmission. Almost 80k and it is doing fine [knock on wood]. I maintain it and take it to the dealer regularly for service. Also tow a single axle trailer between KC and LA regularly so the truck is worked. Love the truck hate the service requirements but it is a cheap price to pay compared to the cost of new tranny. THe ridge has excellent record of reliability according to CR so maybe the transmissions are slightly different. My fiance loves the ridge ans says it is one of the most comfortable vehicles she has driven. MIleage is so so . It handles great on ice and snow and will walk away from any other truck on a twisty road. just fun to drive and very comfortable. Would highly recommend it for many applications where a large trailer is not pulled.

  • avatar
    Toad

    Land Ark, the loss your friend would take on reselling a vehicle he has only owned for a couple of weeks would probably be greater than the cost of replacing the transmission.

    If the van is otherwise good just keep it and set some money aside for a possible transmission replacement in the future. Use the time to line up a source for a reman transmission and a shop to do the work so he is ready if a failure happens. For some reason it seems that the more you do to prepare for the worst the less likely it is to happen; if he saves some money and has a vendor lined up to to the repairs he may never actually need to pull the trigger.

  • avatar
    Hank

    134,000 miles on a 2005 and not a hitch of any kind, and ours has seen life in everything from very hilly upstate NY winters to Texas summers. YMMV

  • avatar
    danio3834

    9 year old minivans from any brand can be a crapshoot. Honda doesn’t publish the failure rates of their transmissions (who would?), but my cousin’s transmission shop still sees a decent amount of these generation vans suggesting that the transmissions still aren’t bulletproof. But what minivan transmission is?

    If he can still get most if not all his money out of it and would be more comfortable buying something else, that might be a reasonable solution. What if he sells it, gets a different ’06 van and has other problems? It this one works properly at the moment and shows no signs if imminent failure, I would make sure it stays well maintained and roll on.

    If trading it now means losing money, and repairing a hypothetical transmission that *might* fail means losing money down the road, why take the hit now when there’s a chance it might be ok?

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      “9 year old minivans from any brand can be a crapshoot. Honda doesn’t publish the failure rates of their transmissions (who would?), but my cousin’s transmission shop still sees a decent amount of these generation vans suggesting that the transmissions still aren’t bulletproof. But what minivan transmission is?”

      If you read Consumer Reports, the Sienna does pretty well (but bombs out on body hardware; specifically the sliding doors).

      The GM U-Body vans also have decent tranmission performance

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        If you can find a GM U-Body van that is 2005 to 2007, without power sliders, and with the 3.9L V6 – a bargain is to be had. If you’re willing to look past the shortcomings – there are MANY shortcomings. However lack of power, engine or tranny problems wont’ be one of them.

        There are a lot of them out there for fire sale because people and mechanics can’t figure out how to keep the ABS/TCS/Stability lights from coming on. Replace the front speed sensor wiring harnesses (they’re about $30 each and take less than an hour) and problem solved.

        Most are told to replace entire hub/bear assemblies or worse the ABS controller (basically a death sentence).

        Find one with the lights on, confirm in inspection the problem is corroded wires, enjoy huge bargain.

        As for the power sliding doors? Satan invented those.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Couldn’t those sliders simply be removed?

          • 0 avatar
            APaGttH

            You can yank the two relays (LHD, RHD) and the one fuse (PSD) and the problem is solved. The doors are definitely “heavier” to use manually because you’re now moving on the track with all of the PSD hardware.

            I pulled the fuses on my beater, life is happier.

            If someone is on a budget, they are a great value – I would only be worried about a lack of maintenance at this point. If I was looking, I’d be looking for one with under 100K miles and I would assume nothing has been done to date – so the first thing I would do is a complete bodily fluid swap and plugs.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          The U-body is such a terrible punishment, for anybody. I could never recommend.

          • 0 avatar
            NoGoYo

            It kind of amazes me how both Ford and GM, despite years of trying, could never make a minivan that even matched their Chrysler competition. And now Ford and GM don’t even make minivans.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Ford makes a few minivans for the US market; Flex/MkT, C-Max, and Transit Connect. Some just don’t have sliding doors. In Europe they have the C-Max, Grand C-Max, Galaxy, Toureno Connect, B-Max, etc.

          • 0 avatar
            NoGoYo

            Sorry, but to me, if it doesn’t have sliding doors, it’s not a minivan.

            The Flex is a station wagon. The C-Max is some weird 5 door hatch thing. I don’t know anything about the ones they sell outside of the US.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Agree, NoGo. Must have sliding doors to be a minivan. The SOLE exception was the Mazda MPV.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Well they have one by your definition then.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          The trouble is that you may have a huge bargain, but you also have a U-body. It’s the minivan equivalent of the W-body Impala: durable like a cockroach, functional, but aggressively unrefined in every respect.

          • 0 avatar
            APaGttH

            … It’s the minivan equivalent of the W-body Impala: durable like a cockroach, functional, but aggressively unrefined in every respect…

            Won’t disagree with any of that. A plus on that also is parts are widely available and dirt cheap.

            Only nit is the durable as a cockroach part applies to the critical items – e.g. engine, tranny, brakes, AC, heat, power windows, locks, and the radio (OK wipers and defroster).

            Any of the accessory stuff, remote start, remote lock/unlock, power sliding doors, air suspension (run, run for you feckin’ life!), heck even the instrument cluster back lighting, all suspect far before their time.

            But, you can pick up a nice Gen II U-Body for $5K or less if you’re willing to risk the miles, that’s barely down payment money if you have so-so credit on an Odyssey of the same era, or a Sienna. Forget any of the 7 passenger SUV/CUV from almost anyone.

            If you need a family truckster and you need a minivan, and you’re under $5K, it’s about your only option. (if you go under $3K I don’t care what it is, reliability is not going to be a virtue)

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        Some are better than others, but the point is they don’t last as long in minivan duty as they do in their passenger car counterparts, in my experience.

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          Yup – this.

          I had read somewhere years ago but will happily be corrected, that everyone except Chrysler is using GMs patent/design for their power sliding doors. GM was first on the market, and would not license to Chrysler, who had to come with an alternative design.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    Just replace the trans when and if it goes bad and then remind the individual that buying new solves these types of issues. You get a warranty etc. We love to extol the virtue of the used car on this site and I am generally one that does, but their are risks associated for the reduced price.

    As a side note, I totally recommend perusing some of the Honda complaint sites, very amusing. Some of these folks are certain their car was or should have been built by the hand of God. My favorites are the ……I have a 2002 Odyssey 167,345 on the odo and my tranny slips and A/C went out..took to the dealer and they said I was out of warranty and wanted actual money to fix it…..never buying a Honda again.

    Seriously, you have a 13 year old car, buy a new one.

  • avatar
    Conslaw

    This summer I bought a 2007 Honda Odyssey with 131,000 miles. From the documentation, it appears to be on its original transmission. Did I buy a ticking time bomb? Well, time will tell, but the transmission works. I checked every source I could find, and on a statistical basis Odysseys of this generation don’t seem to have an unusual number of transmission problems. I also checked what it would take to replace the transmission if it failed, and a rebuilt transmission from an independent shop with a 1 year warranty would be under $2000. My Odyssey was under $11k, completely functional with no rust. Even if I have to put $2k in it for a transmission, that’s a lot cheaper than $36,000 for a new one.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      My understanding is that from 99 to 04 they’re a grenade pin pulled away from self-destruction. 05 to 06 addressed some of the issues, but it still, meh. 07 and above the problems were fully addressed, Honda reliable again.

      If I was looking at 2005 minivans specifically I’d go with the Toyota Sienna if I had a nice budget, a GM U-Body, but in very specific configuration if I didn’t (3.9L V6 no power sliders – or just rip the fuses out for them)

      • 0 avatar
        psarhjinian

        The “no power doors” recommendation certainly applies to the Sienna, though it has trouble with the manual sliding doors as well.

        Otherwise, it’s a pretty solid van; just be sure to change the timing belt on the 3.3L on the older models (3.5 had a chain)

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          I believe that Toyota is/was using the GM power slider hardware, so it would make sense (patent license – so maybe not specific hardware but using the patents).

          The flaw in the GM design is the tolerances are so tight for proper operation. Toss in just general age, the weight of the door and what it has to move, and the rather flexible U-Body platform and it takes very little for the door to be out of alignment. Fail. Good luck getting it back, and keeping it there.

        • 0 avatar
          2drsedanman

          Agreed. I have a 2006 Sienna I bought new and it has been the best vehicle I have ever owned. 2006-2007 Siennas also came standard with the tow package during those years. Maybe this increased capacity helps keep the transmission failures lower. Also, I only have the passenger side power sliding door. There is an override button for it though, in case of failure. Or you could cut the cable. So far, no issues with mine (122,000 miles and counting). They used a lot of these for taxis in New York. Seem to be pretty durable.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Supposedly on the MY05 transaxles the design was revised or replaced (I can’t recall which) so he should be avoiding the endemic glass transmission. However as Sajeev points out, most if not all minivans suffer from higher than normal transaxle issues due to the additional weight a minivan demands with a powertrain built for a lighter sedan.

  • avatar
    an innocent man

    2005 Ody. Pushing 125,000 miles. Hard miles. Regularly maintained, no problems yet.

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    We leased a ’14 Odyssey because I didn’t trust anything used that we deemed affordable. Wasn’t a fan of what I call the “heavy” styling of the 2006-2010 van either and wasn’t buying anything older than that. I travel a lot and the lease payment on the van is a small price to always have a newer car. That’s not saying new cars can’t be wrong or have defects. But it’s a lot less likely.

    My brothers father in law has an 04 Oddy with 160K plus and still has the original transmission(which is starting to fade). He added an auxiliary cooler to it at some point, but he’s not really easy on it. Adding the extra cooler seems to have helped it live a long time. Plus, it has spent most of its life in flat lands.

    Buying used is always a gamble, even if there’s tons of documentation that maintenance was done properly. My brother is fanatical about his cars, but that didn’t stop him from having two 2007 V6 Accords develop transmission issues.

    I’m not fully convinced the 6spd auto in the ’14 isn’t doomed to a mediocre life expectancy. It’s not particularly smooth about anything, especially when cold. The downhill grade logic is really annoying,as in “Dammit, I’m pressing on the accelerator, shift up again!”. Just the overall operation isn’t comforting. But, the Chrysler van with Econ engaged was the same way and the lack of refinement in the Chrysler made it more noticeable.

  • avatar

    “Any used minivan could have a failing tranny: these machines are designed to handle a certain load with their high horsepower V6s, but their trasnsaxles (and cooling systems) are often marginal as they are based on a car.”

    This is spot on–my in-laws have owned several minivans and haul around a motorized wheelchair for my mother-in-law. Their last two–a ’05 Chevy Venture and a ’10 Kia Sedona have had transmission issues. Some of these problems could have been prevented with regularly changing the transmission fluid, but I can’t help but think the 200 pound wheelchair hanging off the back of their van contributed to the problems.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      Nah – as a masochist who has had 3 GM U-Body vans as beater vehicles in his life, I’ve never had a tranny issue. The GM 4L65-E transmission is about as reliable as you can get. GM automatic transmission as a whole are one of their engineering strong points. However, the 4L65-E will not take neglect. The fluid needs to be changed every 50K miles like religion, the filter replaced every 100K, and they will just run, and run, and run, and run…

      • 0 avatar

        I’m almost positive the fluid wasn’t changed on the Venture. It had about 70K miles on it when the tranny started slipping and jerking. Same thing for the Kia, which they recently traded on a custom Toyota Sienna with a full handicap conversion.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I think you mean 4T65-E, the 4L65-E is a RWD transmission. Oh and I would service the filter when the fluid is changed. I have one, the filter was clogged after 60K and was causing the fluid temp to dramatically rise after startup.

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turbo-Hydramatic

      • 0 avatar
        gearhead77

        Typical GM. The powertrain will be running long after the rest of the car fails.

  • avatar
    sco

    For what it’s worth, our 2005 Odyssey went 160K before we got the check engine light/torque converter code. The tranny fluid got changed every 40K in this vehicle, no towing. Dealer wanted roughly $4000 to replace the tranny but since the catalytic converter was also acting up it was trade in time. Actually I thought 160K was pretty good on a mini-van tranny. A 2006 with 71K miles could still have some life in it.

  • avatar
    geeber

    Honda had solved the premature failure problems plaguing the automatic transmissions in V-6 models by the 2005 model year. Odysseys from 2005-07 did have a problem with their torque converters, but that could supposedly be solved by a software re-flash.

  • avatar
    cdotson

    I have a 2006 Ody that’s at 159k, owned it since it had about 78k on it. It’s been regularly maintained during my ownership having had the trans fluid changed shortly after acquiring it and about 36-40k intervals since. The van did have an aftermarket tow hitch on it when we bough it and did not have a trans cooler installed. I have not installed one, but we don’t tow either and have only used it to carry a load rack and bike rack except for pulling an inop pickup a few dozen yards on a strap once.

    If you’re a stickler for service and preventive maintenance, and a guy who habitually keeps vehicles forever must be to a degree, I think the trans issues are overblown. Other weak points of this van that aren’t deal breakers IMHO are iffy power steering fluid supply (there were TSBs on the reservoir/supply line and I had to have an o-ring on the supply tube replaced due to whining at temp) and that’s really about it. You do need to pony up for nice tires or the road noise at highway speed will drive you absolutely insane. I’ve got Michelin Defender XTs on mine and they’re better than Goodyears I put on it previously, which were better than the different model Goodyears it had when we bought it.

    • 0 avatar
      JD-Shifty

      “If you’re a stickler for service and preventive maintenance, and a guy who habitually keeps vehicles forever must be to a degree, I think the trans issues are overblown. ”

      you could say that about any overblown criticism of a car make, especially all the bad news and exaggerations on the internet.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    This is all great info. I passed the link on to my coworker to read through it. My hope was that the responses would range more to the “You only hear about the broken minority” side of things.
    It’s been a little while since I wrote Sajeev and in that time he has gotten permanent plates and I believe resigned to hanging on to it at least in the short term. It was touch and go for a while though.

  • avatar
    schmitt trigger

    Unfortunately for manufacturers, it only takes a single major reliability issue on a model to tarnish its reputation.

    That tarnish gets incorporated into the folklore and the product’s anecdotal evidence. Forever.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Yep, this. The problem was mostly solved by ’05 and completely solved in ’07, and here we are in ’15 hearing about how any V6 Honda, even a brand-new one, is a ticking time bomb.

      I second all the posts above questioning why every heavy transverse-V6-powered van or CUV doesn’t have a monster transmission cooler from the factory. With Fords (Flex, Explorer) and GM Lambdas you can at least get a giant transmission cooler as part of the towing package option. There’s no way I’d get a Flex without it.

  • avatar
    Truckducken

    Back when there was a lawsuit to extend warranty coverage on the Ody trannies, discovery revealed a 9% failure rate at 100K miles. In other words, your pal probably has a lot of life left in the van. Install a tranny cooler, dump 4 quarts of tranny fluid out of the nice simple drain once a year and replace with dealer fluid, and drive on!

  • avatar
    olivebranch2006

    http://www.truedelta.com/Honda-Odyssey/transmission-problems-113

    True Delta has some data on it

    2315 TrueDelta members own (or used to own) a 2000 or newer Honda Odyssey. 252 of these members (10.9%) have reported transmission repairs for their car. A total of 329 transmission repairs to Honda Odysseys–an average of 0.1 per vehicle–have been reported.

    Not the largest sample size but you may find it useful.

  • avatar
    Sloomis

    132,000 miles on my 2005 with original transmission, never a problem in 10 years. Can’t say the same for all the friends and family who opted for a Dodge/Chrysler van instead. I think this Honda transmission issue is way overblown, simply because people expect perfection from Honda so when they stumble, it’s a huge deal. I’d buy a used Odyssey with 100k miles on it before I trusted a new Chrysler product.

  • avatar
    psychoboy

    As is referenced above, there are two distinct issues with the second and third gen odyssey tranny.

    early vans (99-04) have poorly designed internals that actually fail to cool the second gear gearset/clutchpack. It literally has NO direct fluid path in that location. Honda TSB’d the problem with a outboard jet kit that shoots fluid at the second gear from an inspection port. This fix was little more than a Band-Aid designed to get vans (and v6 accords) out of warranty.

    05 and 06 vans have a lockup issue with the torque converter. different problem, but easily assumed to be the same, since the symptoms are the same…slipping at speed or revving between shifts.

    So, if you have, want, or are looking at a 99-06 odyssey, how do you know what you are getting?

    99-04 odysseys (and v6 98-02 accords) fall into four basic categories:

    1) all stock, never been touched (VIN plate on tranny matches vehicle VIN, only has two cooler lines on the top of the tranny) – if it’s ten years or older, or has 100k miles or more and it’s not already slipping, you’ll probably never have a problem with it. wouldn’t hurt to put the accessory cooler on it (Honda offered one, but aftermarket is fine, too). It just plumbs between outlet in the stock cooler in the radiator and the transmission return line. wouldn’t hurt to save up for a reman, or use that money as a down payment on a replacement car if you decide to go that way, instead.

    2) stock trans with TSB jet kit – if you can figure out when it was done, you are probably ok using the same 10yr/100k window and savings account as stock. Look for extra piping attached to the top of the transmission. It should just have two lines on banjo bolts running to and from the cooler(s). If you find a different VIN on your plate, you are probably looking at a salvage unit, same rules apply.

    3) reman – this gets dicey. Honda did not know what their problem was when they started fixing the cars under warranty, and many of the replacement units have the same problem, they just started the clock later. An OKC rebuilder solved the problem (created a new internal bit to properly cool second gear), and eventually got the reman contract from Honda. I’m not aware of any other rebuilder that actually solves the problem, most rebuilders merely replace the clutch packs and clean it all up. the problem remains, and will come along eventually (many reman shops reinstalled the TSB port kit, as well). Look for the Honda serial number sticker or obvious reman red flags (like spray paint). Unless the reman unit came from Honda after 05 or from ATC/Fred Jones after 07, I would use the same windows as above (10yr/100k) to set up my savings account. If the reman unit came from Honda or ATC, I wouldn’t worry about it.

    4) already slipping – Unless they are all but giving it away, it’s probably not worth the effort of buying. An odyssey with a slipping tranny is worth a grand at the very, very outside.

    In all cases, remanufacturing is about your only option. Remans from Honda are no longer available, but ATC units are. You might have to do some work to get an ATC unit to your local garage, but experience tells us that they are about as bulletproof as you are going to get in this design. I think they run about $2000, but your local retail outlet might have a different opinion.

    05&06 vans are much easier to figure out. Take the VIN to the dealer and see if the PCM update has been performed. If not, get it done. If so, and you still have a slipping issue, you have some other issue.

    FWIW:
    I’m not an employee or a paid spokesman for ATC, but I am the guy who supplies them with thousands of OE Honda parts for their rebuilds. I’ve handled and watched dozens of these transmissions come thru our dealership in the decade I’ve been in the job.

    http://www.atcdrivetrain.com

  • avatar
    tubacity

    He already has the vehicle. If it is slipping, shuddering, overheating, puking fluid out the top, dark or black fluid, overheating, get rid of it. If not, no definite reason to dump it now.

    Torque converter shudder is a problem for 2005. Sometimes pronounced. Not just a cosmetic problem. By this mileage, torque converter might need replacing if it shudders. Old Z1 AT fluid was not up to the task either. Transmission still goes bad, not as often as earlier years. Overheating torque converters are another problem.

    This model does not have a transmission cooler unless towing package or aftermarket. Good idea to add it.

    Generally speaking, Toyota has better record for minivan transmissions.

    • 0 avatar
      psychoboy

      All odysseys (and virtually every other vehicle with an automatic transmission) have fluid coolers in the bottom of the radiator.

      odysseys did not come with a secondary cooler outside of the radiator, unless it got the accessory cooler installed by the dealer.

  • avatar
    tubacity

    “All odysseys (and virtually every other vehicle with an automatic transmission) have fluid coolers in the bottom of the radiator”
    True.
    To rephrase, Hondas often need an additional transmission cooler to prevent overheating. And the owners manual says this is required if towing.

    However, at over 100,000 miles, Honda Acura in-radiator transmmission coolers are noted to leak water into the transmission fluid.
    Causes the transmission to fail. Transmission fluid looks like pink milk shake and the transmission slips. http://www.carcomplaints.com/Honda/Pilot/2005/transmission/leak_from_radiator_failure.shtml

    • 0 avatar
      mkirk

      “However, at over 100,000 miles, Honda Acura in-radiator transmmission coolers are noted to leak water into the transmission fluid.
      Causes the transmission to fail. Transmission fluid looks like pink milk shake and the transmission slips. http://www.carcomplaints.com/Honda/Pilot/2005/transmission/leak_from_radiator_failure.shtml”

      So Honda Transmissions also got the Nissan VQ40 style transmission killing radiators. At least those are RWD so easier to replace but still, the internets will tell you that buying a pre 2010 Frontier/Pathfinder/Xterra with an auto is bad news. I’m not generally a fan of in the radiator trans coolers for this reason.

  • avatar
    DrGastro997

    I remember the problems with Honda’s tranny 1999 to 2002 or so. I wonder if the problems started when they adapted BorgWarner’s design in part because of patent issues. Perhaps Honda should have left it alone and keep BorgWarner as their supplier instead of manufacturing it in-house. I may be entirely wrong but it seems this move screwed it up for Honda for several years.

  • avatar
    baconpope

    !!!Check to see if the previous owner performed the “required” dealer service at 30k, 60k, etc. If so, the vehicle is likely on its second or third transmission and should be good for 40k to 60k. Original owners who regularly maintain their vehicles at the dealership apparently get free transmission for the life of the vehicle. Snoop around the dealerships and you will see loads of them.

  • avatar

    On my second gen MDX, so far, a torque converter at 70k, under warranty. They fought me but finally fixed it under warranty.

    There was a trans software update.

    I had a radiator failure at 90k. The ATF cooling line broke a weld and puked the ATF all over. This means that I’m on my third change out of ATF fluid.

    The other issue is that Honda changed the ATF in 2011 or so. While things are good now at 110k, I get the impression that this was a work in progress.

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  • toronado: All good stuff- for me its Steely Dan, Fleetwood Mac’s Rumours, early Chicago (the brassy era),and Al...
  • SCE to AUX: “U.S. officials have repeatedly emphasized that the private sector must step up and provide more...
  • SCE to AUX: Agreed on the overuse. Such a provision has its place, but not everything is a national emergency.
  • BSttac: Never count on the US government to “fix” anything. There sole agenda is taking away any freedom...
  • C5 is Alive: brn, at least in theory the manufacturers had equal access to secure these resources. Apparently only a...

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