By on January 23, 2015

mirage-9998-wheels-toronto-star-jan17

Well, looks like the Mitsubishi Mirage is now available for less than $10,000 CAD. For you Americans out there, that’s roughly $8,000 for a brand new car. And you have two other choices as well.

Hat tip Darin at Mirage Forum.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

33 Comments on “Mitsubishi Mirage Now $9,998 In Canada...”


  • avatar
    Lie2me

    I like the 10 year warranty, like Mitsubishi is going to be around in 10 years

    • 0 avatar
      mjz

      L2M, Mitsubishi isn’t going away anytime soon. They are part of a huge Japanese juggernaut corporation, and everyone forgets they have an assembly plant here, that would cost a fortune to shut down. I think I read they actually made a profit on their North American operations last year.

      • 0 avatar

        Yeah, plus, even if they were to try to pull out of the American retail market, they would probably be required to leave enough cash behind to cover all projected warranty repairs for the remainder of all the cars still registered on American roads. Whether said cars had 1 day or 10 years remaining on their powertrain warranty.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    Is rear wing spoiler truly a selling point?

  • avatar
    Pch101

    I wouldn’t have much confidence in that 10-year warranty.

    Those Canadian delivery fees are painful, eh?

  • avatar
    J.Emerson

    “Man, I can’t wait to apply for a franchise now!”

    -no dealer ever

  • avatar
    michal1980

    ummm. 9998+ 1450 in MANDATORY fees = 11,448. Math should be Fundamental. I expect more from TTAC. This is just lazy click bait headline generation.

    If you fall for this, then Mitsubishi should just make the car free (plus 11,448 in fees).

  • avatar
    Joss

    Boitmerde spend a bit more get a Fit.
    Deflationary pricing or gimmick?

  • avatar

    This and the Nissan Micra are duking it out for small-car market share in Montreal. Usually the Micras are all fancy with them fancy designer alloys and such though. Usually driven be people who a) bought a stickshift but still haven’t really learned how to drive it and/or b) are surprisingly bad at driving in winter.

    • 0 avatar
      nrcote

      a) very possible

      b) that’s not bad driving per se, you have to swerve like that to avoid pedestrians and/or potholes

      • 0 avatar

        Do you have to literally sit on the rev-limited for 20 seconds to get off a patch of ice in your minivan? No, no you don’t Montreal.

        • 0 avatar
          nrcote

          But, but, but, they said to turn the traction control off in deep snow or on ice, and they also said that these brand new and very good chinese winter tires had a lot of grip!

          Still, on YouTube, search for “driving”, “snow” and the city of your choice. Hours of fun, if you’re so inclined.

          For the record, I was born and lived in Montreal until 1990.

  • avatar
    e30gator

    Buying a 2-3 year old compact or midsizer is still going to get you a more substantial vehicle and all-around better value. I remember the depreciation hit on the old Metros being huge, and I can’t imagine the trade in value of a tin can Mitsubishi being much better.

    • 0 avatar

      In fairness, if you’re going to buy one of these you’re probably going to drive it into the ground. Despite used cars being a better value, they’re a bigger risk too. You may not have full information on maintenance, for example.

      I have a coworker who remote starts her car to run for half an hour at lunch, and half an hour before she leaves for home (and presumably half an hour before she comes to work). That car has 7.5 hours times 15 or 20 weeks of winter times however many years of wear and tear on the engine that don’t show up on the odometer. This isn’t true for all cars… but you can’t tell if it’s true for the used car you’re buying.

      • 0 avatar
        e30gator

        You’re probably right about people driving those things into the ground. Most Versas I see over 3-4 years old look like they haven’t been washed since their last warranteed service.

        I would imagine that a thourough inspection by an independent mechanic would greatly improve one’s chances of not buying a used lemon. Also, modern-day CPO programs almost negate any benefits of buyig a new bottom of the barrel car. Not to mention the constant threat of becomming a smashed bug on the bumper of someone’s Tahoe.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    I know bupkis about Mitsubishi Products but isn’t this a passable car at a cheap price for College Students etc. ? .

    Sorta like Tercels and Chevettes are in their day .

    -Nate

    • 0 avatar
      StaysCrunchy

      My wife’s had hers since last May (and no, our credit score isn’t under 600, nor are we renting-to-own all our furniture despite what the majority of TTaC commenters seem to think about Mitsu owners) and it’s been great. It is exactly what it claims to be: Inexpensive, fuel efficient, reliable transportation. It’s an appliance, it’s not an enthusiast’s car. If you go into it with that mindset and get it cheap enough like we did, you’ll be fine.

    • 0 avatar
      davefromcalgary

      Spot on ~Nate.

      Too many on this website (myself included from time to time) are derisive of “appliance cars.” But they serve a very real need, and the latest ones are very decent indeed.

      I rode to university, 30kms each way, for two years in a Geo Metro. A carpool of 4 , we each paid 5 bucks a week in gas. Glamorous, no, but awesome in its own way.

      • 0 avatar
        -Nate

        Thanx ;

        It’s good to know there are still a few El Cheapo transportation devices out there .

        God knows , I have ridden in some really awful vehicles over my life .

        I hope they make enough $ to keep offering bottom rung vehicles .

        FWIW , it -is- possible to direct import Canadian Spec. Vehicles to The U.S.A. ~ my late Father did so in order to buy a Peugeot Diesel Station Wagon , no , it was _red_ not brown and he loved it although parts and service was tricky in Hawaii where he lived at the time . he’s not mechanically adept atall .

        -Nate

  • avatar
    niky

    This is pretty much the modern Geo Metro… albeit roomier, more comfortable at speed and infinitely safer in a crash.

    So it’s crude… but at that money, it’s quite a bargain. A secondhand compact will cost you more to maintain and fuel up in the ten years you can hold on to this sucker with the warranty… well… basically anything but a Metro will cost you more over those ten years… and there’s no assurance the Metro won’t rust to pieces before those ten years are up.

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    This or a 3 yr old compact? decisions, decisions.

    • 0 avatar
      greaseyknight

      In the rust belt, where I just needed wheels to get to work, I’d pick this. If you scrap it after 10 years thats a 1k a year in car costs, plus tires and consumables. As much as I wouldn’t recommend a new car, this one makes sense in that situation.

  • avatar
    wstarvingteacher

    For all the badmouthing I hear given to Mitsubishi the anecdotal evidence I have seen goes the other direction. They are normally high mileage vehicles that start and run (and probably leak oil). They are owned by people who cannot or will not repair them. I have seen a number of them over the years and that has always been true. Two of them were montero sports that I found to be very attractive. Ran across my 4runner first and am not sorry but sure would have considered them.

    My own experience was with a ram50. I drove one and had several servicemen who had one also. I don’t need a commuter but sure would consider this if I did. Like many other cars it seems that the people who badmouth mitsubishi haven’t driven them.

    • 0 avatar
      Sjalabais

      I’m not into the “oh, aren’t they dead yet”-circle, but friends who’ve owned them have had expensive layouts. Manual transmissions seem to be programmed to go at 150000km. Looked at a 7-seater Spacewagon once, ten years old, it was wimsy, used up, rusted out and generally tired.

      Nobody be fooled that you’re not getting what you’re paying for.

  • avatar

    Since there is no such thing as a bad car today this Miage could be the deal of the century. Image paying under $10,000 for a car that will probably last a 150,000 miles. This is just the car college students are looking for today.

  • avatar
    EAF

    Mirage + $25k saved > Golf RS400.

  • avatar
    Sjalabais

    Same car, different name, different price:
    http://s26.postimg.org/cghzjqxns/mitsubishi.jpg
    Yes, 112000 NOK for the base model 1.0-70 Inform is 17900 CAD. Grumble.

    It is advertised as Norway’s cheapest car though.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • NormSV650: You like that Superman Conbo: blue exterior and red thorn interior? Honda needs to work on fixing current...
  • eng_alvarado90: IRS may also end up turning-off many buyers. It may ride great but some off-roading crowd may think...
  • Master Baiter: I gotta have more grille.
  • JMII: +1 this seems to be the way forward – bigger, uglier, more in your face. However they dropped the V8...
  • eng_alvarado90: From this list, I can only speak about the Michelin Defenders. My dad has a set in his Escape and...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber