By on December 4, 2014

celery

How many government employees does it take to equal a cellphone app?

That’s the satirical question Blake Ross attempts to answer in a look at “longhauling” in Las Vegas. Noting that Uber has been forced to temporarily suspend operations in the city thanks to a federal judge, Mr. Ross points out that Uber’s in-house software, already famous for its “god mode”, can immediately determine whether its drivers are taking an unnecessarily long route between the airport and the Strip. Normal taxis have no such supervision, so steps have been taken:

I am blown away by the admirable tenacity of the Nevadan government. The complaint Word doc; the bad driver Excel spreadsheet; the Powerpoint airport sign—when it comes to Microsoft Office 2003, Nevada has tried it all.

As I’ve pointed out on my personal website, we live in a world where the federal government knows your call data records for the past ten years but seems mysteriously unable to say exactly how many police shootings there were in the United States last year. That’s government in action: able to drive a tank through a building full of kids because they don’t like the pastor of their church, unable to figure out how to make taxi drivers stay out of a tunnel.

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69 Comments on ““We Had To Haggle With The Taxi Industry On What The Signs Should Say.”...”


  • avatar
    Lie2me

    “As I’ve pointed out on my personal website, we live in a world where the federal government knows your call data records for the past ten years but seems mysteriously unable to say exactly how many police shootings there were in the United States last year”

    The IRS can’t find emails
    The NSA can’t find emails
    The NSA doesn’t know how many classified documents were taken

    But, they ALL know that I’ll be late for dinner

  • avatar
    schmitt trigger

    Re: the US gov’mt:

    It has a rather straightforward explanation: it all depends on where it wants to focus its attention, and thus spend its efforts and money.

    That focus defies traditional logic, but it is usually (in politician’s environments) applied towards the results of the next election.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    “The major problem—one of the major problems, for there are several—one of the many major problems with governing people is that of whom you get to do it; or rather of who manages to get people to let them do it to them.
    To summarize: it is a well-known fact that those people who must want to rule people are, ipso facto, those least suited to do it.
    To summarize the summary: anyone who is capable of getting themselves made President should on no account be allowed to do the job.” – Douglas Adams, Restaurant and the End of the Universe

    I would personally argue that this applies to 90% of the people that have get elected/re-elected to their jobs.

  • avatar
    BR1950

    These signs served a purpose. Sometimes consistency is a good thing.
    In fact, in most cases. Chaos is being promoted by those who benefit from it. Keep that in mind.

  • avatar
    319583076

    System efficacy is inversely proportional to system complexity – as a first order approximation.

    Complex systems usually produce complex responses. Complex responses are not equivalent to solutions.

  • avatar
    thelaine

    It’s just another government racket. Government would be cheap if they only did what they ought to be doing.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    Just got back from Vegas and noticed the most blatant taxi-lobby ripoff scheme ever: minivans have their middle back row seat blocked by a piece of foam (a center armrest of sorts) and it is outright illegal for three to sit in the back of a van in Vegas. All in the interests of passenger safety we were told. So our party of six people had to get 2 cabs everywhere we went. They’re really grabbing at crumbs out there.

  • avatar
    Waterview

    I’m usually first in line to protest any form of larger government or more regulation, but when it comes to the taxi business, I don’t mind if LOCAL governments want to weigh in with some rules. The Uber model works well until something goes wrong. I’d like to know that there’s some even minimal form of licensing and insurance for drivers. With Uber, it’s a bit of a crapshoot.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      Just offer t pay enough to make it worth vile for someone to only hire “licensed” drivers. I generally couldn’t care less.

    • 0 avatar
      ihatetrees

      Uber’s model has superior incentives (rates that flex due to high demand or inclement weather, immediate consistent feedback about drivers AND customers) to consistently get it right over time. I trust that model.

      Cab companies and their government regulators simply don’t – their model is inferior. They are coddled monopolies that have grown fat on doing things their way.

      Government COULD track cab drivers (like Uber does its drivers) and fire (or ban from cab driving) jack-holes who long haul. But that’s difficult and judgmental – it’s much easier to ban competition and add layer of silliness to the regulatory state.

      • 0 avatar
        greaseyknight

        In short, its a prime example of government regulation vs the free market. Perfect? Absolutely not. But Uber and Lyft are showing us what can happen when the free market is allowed to work, and consumers have more choices.

  • avatar
    Xeranar

    When you’re done playing with the strawman government you’ve built I’ll gladly respond.

    Frankly the simple answer is taxi drivers aren’t regulated the same way and Uber’s ‘God Mode’ for finding them abusing the system is counterintuitive if you’re paying a flat fee never mind that it is the exact intrusion your argument so flatly states that they hate. Why is it ok if Gov Co. knows all this info but regular Gov doesn’t?

    By the way, the NSA isn’t nearly as ubiquitous as they seem never mind that the people who compile actual statistics rely on lower levels of government and that can be inaccurate at times. But please go about wanking angrily, I’ll sit back and watch.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      What do you know about the NSA that we don’t? Please tells us, I’ll sit back and listen

      • 0 avatar
        Xeranar

        Simply this, the practical reality of the NSA’s search algorithms means that most internet traffic IS searchable but since they still rely on human eyes after flagging it means that about .0000001% of any traffic at any given time is being reviewed. Never mind that the NSA should be stopped from even doing this as it is a direct infringement onto our right for privacy I am merely pointing out that the boogeyman you’re relying on is more of a paper tiger. But that hasn’t stopped the B&B from frothing angrily while voting for the exact people who support the NSA in every respect.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          I don’t know that you can say that we’ve been voting for people who support the NSA when those same people didn’t know to what extent their and our privacy had been breached. Revelations over NSA over reach are continually being revealed

    • 0 avatar
      Master Baiter

      “Why is OK if Gov Co. knows all this info but regular Gov doesn’t?”

      My relationship with any given company is voluntary. With “regular” government, not so much.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        +1

        And the most some Company can do with the info is to try to induce me to voluntarily buy some service from them. They don’t employ jackbooted thugs to make the inducement non voluntary. Things do get problematic when the COs get to go to the Gov for jack booted thug assistance, but the problem is still the jack booted thugs. Which are not employed by the COs.

      • 0 avatar
        Xeranar

        So you’re simply more willing to give yourself over to a private company but get upset when the government levels the playing field. I get it….I get it. You like the theoretical relationship you have with a company against the reality of the relationship you have.

        • 0 avatar
          stuki

          More like, I’m more comfortable talking smack about Zuckerberg while living in the US, despite risking my Facebook account being deleted; than I would be talking smack about Josef Stalin if I lived in the land of tightly regulated corporations he presided over.

          Take away their preferential access to government coercive services (aka take away the coercive services themselves, since they will always be made preferentially available to those more equal), and corporations can’t really do me much harm, can they? If Uber got too evil, I’d just start Uber.Improved. Provided, of course, Uber couldn’t come dragging with everybody’s favorite thug army and shut me down for blah-blah so called IP violations…..

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          You don’t get it at all. When I apply for a job or a loan I expect my personal life to be examined because I’m aware of it and I’m hoping for some gain in return. Unauthorized scrutiny of my personal life which can only be detrimental to me is unacceptable. I’m really surprised that you don’t seem to grasp the difference

          • 0 avatar

            Oh, he grasps the difference all right. If you remember that ultimately it’s more about power than ideology his behavior makes sense. It may be cloaked in supposed moral and intellectual superiority and embroidered with ideological agendas, but at its essence it’s Lord Of The Flies and Animal Farm.

          • 0 avatar
            Xeranar

            Except your scrutiny under actual examination usually falls short of objective measurement. In other words: If the system worked like you wanted it to it wouldn’t have created the original financial bubble. Corporations answer to no one except whatever farce we want to call ‘stockholders’ while the government answers to voters.

            The constant comparison to totalitarian regimes is beyond old. I understand in your cold war draped reality you’re still fighting commies but welcome to the 21st century where capitalism has proven the greatest threat to any democratic process.

      • 0 avatar
        Maymar

        Well, technically, you do have the option to move to Somalia or something, the government can’t stop you from that.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      The B&B: Wanking angrily since 19XX(TM).

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      “Frankly the simple answer is taxi drivers aren’t regulated the same way and Uber’s ‘God Mode’ for finding them abusing the system is counterintuitive if you’re paying a flat fee never mind that it is the exact intrusion your argument so flatly states that they hate.”

      I tried to diagram that sentence, and failed.

      • 0 avatar
        Xeranar

        Your ignorance is not my problem, but thanks for the pointless ad hominem.

        To simplify for you, Taxi Drivers aren’t regulated at the driver level to keep the trip shortest because they aren’t controlled by the government in that way. Their employer would expect them to manage the routes appropriately. Following that, Uber who has used flat fees or limited fare charges so it is of limited value to maximize length of travel. Also since uber doesn’t do street pickups their scheduling system means it is more effective to keep getting passengers out faster for more fares. You see how the argument falls apart or are you still going to claim ignorance to try and score points?

  • avatar
    Clarence

    Is the tank line a reference to the Branch Davidian cult? Weird. If it wasn’t for Timothy Cain and Sajeev, I wouldn’t bother with this site anymore.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      Children whose parents are a member of a “cult” are still children, you know. And those children were murdered.

      Don’t let that bother you. We’ll be posting new sales figures tomorrow and you can get *really* upset over that.

      • 0 avatar
        Xeranar

        Pfft, no. We need to be upset about what bothers you, Jack! I mean we’re all coming here to read your angry diatribes against the ‘guvmint’ and how they’re so evil for having to deal with private corporations against one private corporation dictating to their employees.

        As an aside, the Branch Davidians were a sad and confused lot and those children didn’t have to die but that’s what happens when minors are held in disturbing situations and why Child Services is a necessary component of our government for the protection of all.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        Human rights violations are boring compared to The Big Dumb Trucks playoffs

      • 0 avatar
        fastwilly

        I have some advice for Mr. Baruth.

        Please look up, read, and understand the actual elements of murder. It shouldn’t take long.

        When you are done with that, please do a Google search for
        “David Koresh” + “child abuse.” Whether the Feds had probable cause for a search is debatable, but Koresh wasn’t exactly the John Lithgow character from Footloose.

        Think over the information carefully, then recant your assertions of murder out of respect for the ATF agents who lost their lives.

        Reread the TTAC reboot principles published when you became the EIC.

        In the alternative, you can just write another essay on how annoying you find “fat chicks.”

    • 0 avatar

      It could just have much been a reference to the mayor of Philadelphia bombing MOVE in 1985. Government has a monopoly on force and it seems that it doesn’t matter what exact law will put you in its crosshairs, even selling loose cigarettes, but that once you are in government’s grasp, your liberty and quite possibly your life can be in danger no matter who your grandparents were or what your religious beliefs are.

      To be sure, some of the people targeted by the government are indeed serious criminals or military enemies of the U.S., but the more laws and regulations that there are, the more intrusive government gets, there’s a greater likelihood that more or less innocent people will find themselves dealing with some form of law enforcement and some of them will indeed be abused.

      Because the state has such a monopoly over taking away your freedom and your life it needs to be restrained, that’s a foundational concept of American government. I’m Jewish and the worst episodes of murderous Jew-hatred have occurred when the haters had the power of the state with them.

      • 0 avatar
        Xeranar

        Talk about classic right-wing diatribing at it’s best. The whole loose cigarettes is what got Eric Garner killed! It isn’t the racist system that supports corruption in the police force to maintain a social order that is desired by a minority of people. The force used in that action had zero to do with loose cigarettes, it had everything to do with his race and the social antagonism wrought by it. But keep talking the libertarian talk. It plays well in Peoria, I am sure.

        • 0 avatar
          petezeiss

          “the racist system that supports corruption in the police force”

          *sigh*
          You make me feel so 1972 again. Angela Davis was smokin’ hot. And a pretty good shade tree back then, too.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Xeranar is pretty good at stringing a lot of impressive words and thoughts together, but doesn’t really say much. Kind of like sitting through a really good movie with a dumb ending

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            yeah, dat blue guy… he git kinda ‘motional.

            An’ ah maight too,
            If ah was blue!

            ah-huh-huh-huh

            Ah cracks mah own se’f UP!

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            LOL! The “blue guy” should be allowed to voice his opinion, like anyone else. We live in a “free” society and I believe the more points of view, the merrier.

            That doesn’t mean that anyone’s view will win out over another.

            Never fear, though. Americans will always find their own way. After all, we Americans always get exactly what we deserve, because we vote for it.

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            Yeah, I like the little bugger.. at least he’s a fighter.

            He might work on syntax and vocab a might, and I presume he does for his scholarly efforts. But watching him get all hoppy-mad here is kind of a tickle.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Ha-HA!!! There are so many contributors of comments on this, and other sites, who want to effect some societal mass behavioral change by advancing their own agenda.

            Like I said, Americans are an obtuse lot. We find our own way in life and what works for us. And the last national election settled what the majority wanted. Majority rules.

            The next two years hold the promise of political stability, no alterations in life styles for most of us, a do-nothing Congress consisting of obstructionist-Democrats instead of obstructionist-Republicans, and a lame duck O’bama.

            No need to get emotional about anything, nothing of any consequence is gonna be achieved, just do watcha wanna do AND GIT’R DONE!

            Hell, even taxi drivers are breathing a sigh of relief.

            BTW, an excellent time to buy that new car or truck if someone is so inclined. And many are!

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            Yepper… I’ve got a compressor going out on our main fridge right now that concerns me a whole lot more than any legislative issue.

            SOB is only 7 years old but sounds like a stuck piston tripping the overload relay.

            Any advice, blue guy?

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            That compressor is a direct result of government interference because of the industrial level playing field caused by too many cigarettes by the police who for whatever reason do that to people who voted for it to be that way.

            In other words, you need a new refrigerator…

            … Thanks, Obama

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            Click-buzzzzzz-click.
            Click-buzzzzzz-click.
            Click-buzzzzzz-click.

            Edit: Gotdamm! I just heard the compressor catch!

            WooHoo.. maybe she’ll last till we can get another one in here.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            I, too, would recommend a new refrigerator. We woke up on the morning of the 4th of July with a huge puddle of water under our main fridge in the kitchen. What a mess! The Amana was only 6 years old.

            The wife and I went to Lowe’s at 8am the same day, where she picked out a new fridge, this time made by Whirlpool, a guy helped me load it into the bed of the Tundra, and the rest is history.

            Called the PNM, our electric utility the next business day, they hauled the old fridge away and gave us $50 credit on our next electric bill.

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            Yep, this is an Amana botom-freezer. Model series ABB1924. No extended warranty because I’ve always thought those were poo.

            I may have changed my mind about that little piece of extortion if modern fridges are going to kakk-off inside of 8 years.

            Jeez… what happened to the 20-year fridge I’ve been accustomed to?

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            Yep, this is an Amana botom-freezer. Model series ABB1924. No extended warranty because I’ve always thought those were poo.

            I may have changed my mind about that little piece of extortion if modern fridges are going to kakk-off ins!de of 8 years.

            Jeez… what happened to the 20-year fridge I’ve been accustomed to?

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Buy a Sub Zero if you want one to last 20 years, if you’re Ok with buying a $7000 refrigerator

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            If I had any reason to suspect that Sub-Zero doesn’t just buy junk guts like everyone else and depend on razzle-dazzle in their electronics and appearance to sell, I’d be willing to.

            But without a tradesman’s knowledge of components… how could I ever tell? I’ll always spend for quality if I can be certain I’m buying some.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            I have a Maytag, double door s!de-by-s!de, 29cu ft, that I bought in Jan 1980 at the BX upon my return from Germany.

            Ice maker and water dispenser died decades ago, but the compressor still works good.

            We use it as a beer and soda cooler, wine cooler, Starbucks coffee cooler, overflow fridge for food, storage of canned fruit and bottled sauces, etc.

            The freezer portion we use for diGiorno’s Pizzas, Stouffer meals, breakfast food, whatever.

            Once in a great while I take the vacuum to the bottom and vac out all the dust bunnies. Other than that, nothing.

            If it ever goes, I’m not going to fix it. Just replace it. That should drop my electrical draw from 9-amps to about 4 amps on the new one, like it did on the new Whirlpool fridge.

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            Hmm.. only draws 4 amps…on start-up?

            I wonder if the flip side of that is wimpier motor windings and that’s why they’re not lasting like they used to.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            I had a Sub Zero for 10 years without problems sold the house with it still humming along, they’re really are good appliances. I don’t think they’re worth seven times what your refrigerator cost, but they’re good

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            Hmm.. only draws 4 amps…on start-up?

            I wonder if the flip s!de of that is wimpier motor windings and that’s why they’re not lasting like they used to.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            That’s what it says in the literature, but when it kicks on, my lights don’t dim like they used to with the Amana.

            It’s pretty efficient. Has solid walls of foam. New-builts are actually better than the old stuff and the new brushless/capacitorless induction motors use higher efficiency magnets.

            We have no complains about the new Whirlpool fridge. Works better than advertised.

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            Thanks for the info. I guess it’s off to CR I go. I really, really hate shopping for stuff under time pressure.

        • 0 avatar
          Xeranar

          @Lie2me

          I’m sorry, what was that? I understand you disregard my view but to constantly claim I’m talking with an intellectual tone without substance is getting tiresome. If you dislike my comments simply don’t respond. You’re not disproving the argument, you’re simply trying to ad hominem the speaker in hopes of scoring points with an audience built to accept your worldview.

          You don’t scare me. You don’t shake my will to speak. At the end of the day, if you seriously dislike what I have to say build a better argument and I’ll graciously listen and critique it rather than trying to knock you down as a person.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            I don’t know if I like or dislike your comments, you go from thought to ideal to indignation to condescension without taking a position or making a defensible point. You make a valiant effort with a decisively intellectual flair, but you never seem to get to wherever it is your going.

            If you get my drift

          • 0 avatar
            Xeranar

            Then let me simplify it for you. The actions of the police in killing Eric Garner, Brown, or the acquittal of Trayvon Martin’s killer are all linked directly to the reinforcement of social norms dictated by a racially charged society. It isn’t the government mandating the death of black citizens, in fact if you read the laws put on the books these deaths are explicitly prohibited. The presumption of Ronnie’s argument is that by virtue of the government making a tax on cigarettes it opened up an illegal trade which inevitably is what killed Garner. The point I made was that the argument is tantamount to lunacy because it has to presume so much. It faces Occam’s razor in that the illegal cigarettes being sold are tacitly linked to the illegal use of force. This in turn requires that the police brutality being done is tacitly supported by ‘government’ (which is so ill-defined in his concept that it’s hard to pin down where they’re agreeing and who is doing so). His argument relies on us to believe that the government is what caused Eric Garner’s death. It asks us to disregard some fundamental parts of the equation in doing so.

            So to explain my position better, Garner’s death is attributable to a society-wide epidemic of police brutality on Blacks. This is of course not done at the government’s behest but is a social norm reinforced by fascist views and accepted American culture. The government is actually trying to stop the crime but also when faced with using juries and facing a right-wing racially tinged society are fearful to actually execute justice as set forth. It’s undeniable the Brown/Wilson marches were racially motivated with Wilson’s marches 99% white and Brown’s about 80% Black. The cultural stereotypes attributed to Brown were enormous. The same has been applied to Garner. Thus the issue isn’t with a government’s monopoly on violence which is a bit convoluted since we’ve already proven that if fascist positions are accepted violence against certain people is approved of regardless of law (i.e. Emmett Till, Trayvon Martin, etc..). The fact that he had to write that to attempt to further his anti-government arguments just verifies his argument is on intellectual quicksand since he willfully ignored large tracts of well-established facts and theories.

            Now, with both positions explained I hope you feel capable of making an educated decision or refrain from further comment.

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            So, blue guy… would a reasonable distillation of your argument be that when faced with a big black guy acting suspiciously, our LEOs will uniformly spazz-out and immediately escalate to lethal force knowing that the rest of us whities will back them to the hilt?

            Further, that implicit in your making all this noise about it is your disapproval of such a paradigm?

          • 0 avatar
            Xeranar

            Nope, not a reasonable one at all. An oversimplified and intentionally built argument made of the absurd fallacy to devalue it would be more accurate.

            I understand you’re attempting humor but the crux isn’t that all police will act uniformly more violent but that some police will because of established social stereotypes. The Black community has warts like all communities but the clear violence towards them by police is more than just puffery. However you slice it being Black is what killed Garner not those cigarettes, those were just the catalyst.

            Following that, I’m not sure what your arguing beyond that? That the police aren’t acting with the ‘government’ (as however ill-defined) consent? The police and the juries/departments that protect them are reflecting social values not one’s set forward by the ‘government’ as an institutional body. This is why rival government agencies and in this case the DoJ are looking into the affairs. When one element is corrupted another can still be true. This actually is a more complex schema than the rudimentary one put forward by Ronnie of ‘Government = Violence = Control = Bad” because it accepts that the monopoly of violence isn’t being used by some shady agency of hidden power but established social norms that can be changed and controlled by the people if a large enough group pressures them to change. In other words, my argument is still supported because I don’t pretend it is all-encompassing and that the government is always perfect and good. I’m arguing the government is an apparatus of the people. When the people fail, it fails, when the people succeed, it succeeds.

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            “being Black is what killed Garner”

            So I got it right in one.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            This is disappointing. Black-and-white (no pun intended) thinking is supposed to be the currency of the right, not of the left.

            It’s fair to ask why beat cops are being used for tax enforcement against low income people in a minority community, when minor tax violations are usually handled with nasty letters and meetings with auditors instead of chokeholds.

            The fair point made by the (few reasonable) libertarians (as opposed to the wingnuts among them) is that this sort of law enforcement goes hand-in-hand with broken windows policing methods that are used to oppress targeted groups of people. The multitude of laws end up serving as an excuse to hassle people who are usually of color — the bad laws are tools in the oppressors’ tool kit.

            This specific issue arises because we have a bill of rights. Our system requires “probable cause” and “reasonable suspicion,” which encourages the police to manufacture both of these in abundance. The law are used to further the agenda of a police force that lords over the public who they are supposed to serve — the more laws that there are to violate, the more power that the enforcers have to enforce.

            On the other hand, Garner’s race and social status certainly impacted the outcome. Let’s say for the sake of argument that Eric Garner was a terrible tax cheat who deserved to be punished. If that’s the case, then send a nice pack of revenue agents after him who can bury him in paperwork and misery just as they would a white-collar violator.

            Apparently, Garner wasn’t deserving enough to deal with guys with suits and briefcases; he gets the rough treatment, instead. The right zingers who deny the possibility that racism exists ought to ask themselves why that is.

        • 0 avatar
          CJinSD

          Garner’s death is supposed to be about race? Are you suggesting that Kizzy Adoni wasn’t black? She was the lieutenant in charge of the arrest and is plainly visible in the video. The officers were acting on her orders and directly under her supervision. She was as dismissive of Garner’s protests as anyone else. Is she a racist? Is a career criminal with 31 priors who is resisting arrest credible if he is white? Does NYC have a 32 strikes rule that put him in jeopardy sufficient to explain why he was resisting arrest this time? Why didn’t the murderous cops off him any of the other times he was caught flagrantly violating the law? He was out on bail for previous charges and back on the street doing the same thing.

          I don’t agree with the nanny state taxation that created the black market(is that racist?) that Garner was a participant in. The stores that have to collect those taxes deserve to have their doorways free of members of organized crime pushing untaxed cigarettes. The left wing lunatics that are using this incident to push their agendas are pretty cheeky. From Kizzy Adoni, to the nanny-tax, to the fact that Garner wasn’t in prison already, this is the fault of the people using it to stir up hatred and resentment. Vile.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            I think the media are just patronizing the negro communities in America.

            The guy wasn’t some innocent bystander, and he resisted arrest. Unauthorized selling of cigarettes in NY is a crime. Seriously!

            For the Ferguson incident, very few media outlets mentioned that the kid was a thief, had stolen cigars from a store, bullied the store owner, and attacked the cop. NBC did. So did PBS.

            People get shot and killed in New Mexico for a whole lot less than that. Don’t believe it? Wise up with articles about Albuquerque and their police force.

            Feds are involved there too but can’t find anything wrong with the shooting of the Latinos.

            Bottom line: don’t resist arrest and don’t attack a cop.

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