By on May 13, 2014

subiebmw

The amount of time it takes to sell a new vehicle is usually a good indicator of demand for that model and gives a slightly different perspective from the more traditional number of days supply statistic. The average time that new cars and light trucks spent on U.S. dealer lots last month, 56 days, was up slightly from March’s 51 days, which was the same average selling time in April of 2013. Cars.com’s Kicking Tires blog has compiled lists of both the fastest selling vehicles in April as well as the cars that have lingered on the lots perhaps a bit past their shelf date. The ten fastest selling cars averaged just under 11 days from the time they rolled off their transporters until they were driven home by happy customers. The ten slowest selling cars took an average of 5 months to sell. The slowest selling car in America in April was the 2014 BMW 640i xDrive coupe, which sat on Dealer lots an average of 205 days. The two quickest selling cars were Subarus, the 2015 Forester and 2015 WRX, which both took an average of just 7 days to sell.

Complete lists after the break.

The presence of Subarus at the top of the fast-selling list shouldn’t come as a surprise as the company as gone from strength to strength in North America over the past few years. Demand for their own cars in North America is one reason why Fuji Heavy Industries, Subaru’s corporate parent, will discontinue building Camrys under contract to Toyota in their Indiana plant.  The fact that BMW has four of the ten slowest selling vehicles (including the MINI Paceman) may be evidence that BMW’s business model of churning out additional models for narrower and narrower niches has its limits.

Kicking Tires excluded limited editions, exotics and other cars that don’t pass a certain threshold of sales from the list of fastest sellers, while the slowest sellers list includes all models.

April’s 20 fastest selling cars:

2015 Subaru Forester: 7 days
2015 Subaru WRX: 7 days
2014 Land Rover Range Rover: 8 days
2014 Land Rover Range Rover Sport: 10 days
2015 Lexus RX 350: 11 days
2015 Mercedes-Benz GL450: 11 days
2015 Chevrolet Suburban 1500: 13 days
2014 Toyota Highlander: 13 days
2014 Audi Q5: 14 days
2014 Chevrolet Corvette coupe: 14 days
2014 Nissan Rogue: 14 days
2015 Audi A3: 16 days
2014 Mercedes-Benz S550: 16 days
2014 Toyota Tacoma crew cab: 16 days
2015 Chevrolet Silverado 2500 HD crew cab: 17 days
2014 GMC Sierra Denali crew cab: 17 days
2014 Lexus GX 460: 17 days
2015 Mazda CX-5: 18 days
2014 BMW X5: 18 days
2014 Toyota Tacoma four-door extended cab: 18 days

The 10 slowest  selling car in April:

2014 BMW 640i xDrive coupe: 205 days
2014 Mercedes-Benz E400 Hybrid: 179 days
2014 Jaguar F-Type convertible: 157 days
2014 Infiniti Q60 coupe: 157 days
2014 BMW M6 convertible: 143 days
2014 Mitsubishi Outlander: 141 days
2014 Jaguar F-Type S convertible: 140 days
2014 Acura RLX: 135 days
2014 BMW 650i xDrive Gran Coupe: 133 days
2014 Mini Paceman: 129 days

Ronnie Schreiber edits Cars In Depth, a realistic perspective on cars & car culture and the original 3D car site. If you found this post worthwhile, you can get a parallax view at Cars In Depth. If the 3D thing freaks you out, don’t worry, all the photo and video players in use at the site have mono options. Thanks for reading – RJS

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76 Comments on “The Fastest and Slowest Selling Cars in April Were a Subaru and a BMW...”


  • avatar

    Not surprised.

  • avatar
    FractureCritical

    Just imagine how well Subaru would do if their cars weren’t completely hideous.

    Audi A3 in the top 20 is premature as it likely includes dealer-bought cars for demos and loaners. There’s a chorus line of them at my local Audi service department in loaner livery. A lot of them. I’ll wait for at least the August numbers before ruling it a success.

    why August, you may ask? becuase that’s when double-pronged attack hits the books of the dealers screaming to stop the channel stuffing (63 or more in stock at all local dealers!!)AND the A3’s real competiton hits the streets in the form of the new Golf and GTI.

    • 0 avatar
      TheyBeRollin

      Totally with you on Subaru’s styling. It’s too bad the new WRX is just yet another Impreza with minor body mods. Their concept was so good and the car they actually produced was such a letdown.

      Is the A3’s only competition in that segment really from VW? Isn’t the CLA also a direct competitor? The Impreza in higher trim levels? The BMW 1-series?

      Audi is marketing the hell out of the A3. I don’t watch TV and only listen to the radio (mostly online) a bit, and I have heard a lot of A3 commercials or seen ads online… They really want to get these new sedans out there.

      • 0 avatar
        sproc

        Yes, I admit to being a bit of an Audi fanboi, but the A3 really destroyed the CLA in the latest Car & Driver comparo, which does not surprise me. However, I’ll be in the market soon, and if I like it, the GTI is much more likely to end up my driveway for five good reasons!

      • 0 avatar
        Synchromesh

        I beg to differ. I like the 2015’s styling so much more than the concept. The concept was nice and wild but there is no way I’d want to drive something like that on the street. The new car blends in well and that’s a good thing, imho.

        Now, the real problem with the new WRX is the lack of hatchback. If they fix that I might consider selling my current ’12 for it.

        • 0 avatar
          TheyBeRollin

          Blends in well? It has a hood scoop and the STI still has an enormous wing. The concept wasn’t even that outrageous in comparison to many cars today. If you raise the bottoms of the bumpers a bit and paint the car a common color, the concept would barely stand out next to a BRZ.

    • 0 avatar

      “Imagine how well Subaru would do…”

      You mean better than a week lot life?

      • 0 avatar
        TheyBeRollin

        Like most of the others at the top of this list, nobody is buying them from dealer stock. There is no dealer stock. They’re just taking deliveries on pre-orders. I just did a quick search and there isn’t a single one in stock at any of the local Subaru dealers anywhere near me.

        Surprisingly, I have seen brand new WRX STIs on the road where I live.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      I’d prefer the MK VII GTI or GLI to the A3 as well. As far as the 2015 WRX goes I like it. No, it’s not the concept but I don’t have a problem with it. The STI, though, is off putting. The giant wing unbalances the car, at least to my eyes.

  • avatar
    cgjeep

    So if a new car sits for a long time can that make it go bad, or lead to premature problems? If I leave my 91 Integra sitting for 200+ days it won’t be happy. The main reason I ask is I found a new 2013 Mazda 3 with 10 miles on it that the dealer is selling used with only 10 miles on it. Ugly color combination, grey exterior with tan/black interior, but the price is right. My worry is that they have had the car for a little over a year and only 10 miles on it. Not 10k, but 10.

    • 0 avatar
      snakebit

      Forget premature problems with a new car which the dealer has had for 200 days. You may abandon your Integra for 200 days, but it’s very rare that a new car in inventory sits that long without being started and driven a little, even if it’s just in and out of the showroom.

      If you’re shopping in the dealership, particularly in June or later, and you want a car they have in stock, and you’re certain that it’s been there for 200 days, you’re in the drivers seat. They’ve been paying flooring costs(interest to a bank for loaning them money to buy new cars) for that long, there may be money coming to them from the factory(maybe in addition to rebates to you), and no one before you wanted this car, all factors in your favor.

      In most cases, you can find out online what they paid(invoice), if you have rebates coming once you buy, if the factory will pay, and how much, direct to the dealer for selling this model. And in the case of direct payments paid to dealer, you can use part of that to negotiate the price down. And finally, don’t let them charge a “documentation fee”, usually $200 and sometimes more, and almost always dumped on you at the very last moment on the purchase agreement. It’s legal for them ask for it, but no state or municipality requires you to pay it if you don’t want to(check with your states consumer affairs office, believe me-you won’t be the first person to ask about it). Think of this fee as pure profit for the dealer for doing nothing. It doesn’t matter if it’s nicely printed on the sales agreement like so much fine print – the fee can be scratched off or a new sales agreement written if you don’t want to pay it and the dealer still wants to move this car that you’ve chosen.

    • 0 avatar
      gearhead77

      I ve had three cars now that were lot queens. My current ’10 Altima ( leased new in 2011),2008 Mazda 5 (bought in 2009 new)and an 04 Mitsubishi Lancer Sportback bought new in 2005. All were great deals due to their queen status.

      All three sat for over a year in the Northeast, the Mazda in the Bronx, the other two in Pittsburgh. My common issues have been batteries( all that sitting shortens their life I guess) and brake rotors warping, since the spot covered by the caliper doesn’t oxidize like the rest, leaving a distinct pattern on the rotor. I just did the rear rotors on the Mazda 6 months ago, the spot was still there 38,000 miles later.

      The Mitsubishi was totaled in a rear end collision, but not before I put 77k on it in a year and a half. No issues other than the brakes and battery.

    • 0 avatar
      dolorean

      cgjeep, the major issue with your Mazda3, is that it’s still there, at the dealership, soaking up lot space and property tax. Frankly I’m shocked that the dealership didn’t move the iron out to a used car lot they own or sold to a lesser dealer. I’ve found a few of these nuggets on lots myself; a ’04 Mountainer AWD Eddie Bauer in ’06 and a ’06 Fusion S in ’08. Both were ‘brand new’ and both were still for sale as NEW. I actively engaged the sales force to sell each at a discount, using the valid argument that these cars, once bought, were no longer ‘brand new’, but two year old used. If I were to pay the sticker price of the vehicles the dealer was asking for, I would effectively eat two years of depreciation in the space of time it would take me to drive off the lot. I was unpleasantly surprised that the sales people did not seem to share my outlook of the situation and refused to budge on the original sticker price. Sadly, I didn’t buy either.

      • 0 avatar
        cgjeep

        They moved the car to the used lot and are selling it as a CPO. Selling for 16k, stickered for about 23/24, is a touring model, manual with the sky active engine. There was a lot of money on the hood of these that was disappearing so the dealer bought it from themselves moved them to he used car lot. Pretty neat actuality as with CPO I would get a better warranty then new. The in service date for the original new car warranty is last month so I would still get almost all of 3/36 and them 100k power train. usually when they so something like this they make it a loaner car or demo for salesperson to drive, but the dealership in question no longer allows demos for staff and manual kept it from being loaner. Funny, if had 10k miles on it I wouldn’t worry but only having 10 and being a year old I worry about rubber bits drying up ect. Heck even the gas it left factory with must be bad by now.

    • 0 avatar
      dwford

      All cars have the month and year of build on the Vin plate inside the driver’s door jamb. If the car you are looking at is a lot queen at this time of year, it may have suffered through a rough winter on a car lot – getting pounded on by the foam snow brooms, getting jumpstarted due to dead batteries, and having the engine revved the shit out of and the tranny abused trying to unstick it from snow. The car salesmen and lot attendants are not kind to the cars after they’ve been outside in the cold all day cleaning snow, and really don’t give a shit about being easy on the cars.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      My ’08 Saab 9-3 wagon had sat for 18 months with 11 miles on it when I bought it in ’09. No one in Boston wanted a white on white manual transmission wagon without heated seats. Go figure.

      As for the Gran Coupe, I wonder how or if they count build to order cars. My dealer has had a single demo example since the came out. All of their sales have been BTO. Not surprising, why would

  • avatar
    JohnnyFirebird

    Look at that top 20 list and think to yourself “These are not cars I can negotiate a good deal on.” The opposite is true for the bottom 20. There are advantages to liking unpopular cars! (And disadvantages when it comes to getting rid of them – most of the time)

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    Nothing on the slow-selling list is surprising.

    The 9-year old Tacoma on the fast-selling list is, though.

    • 0 avatar
      kvndoom

      Yeah because smaller trucks don’t sell, says everyone but Toyota who laughs all the way to the bank.

      • 0 avatar
        whynot

        Being on the fast seller list doesn’t necessarily mean that they are selling a lot of them, just that demand is exceeding supply, although Tacoma sales have increased the past couple of years (still off from 8-10 years ago). It will be interesting to see what happens when the Colorado is released.

      • 0 avatar
        Xeranar

        Tacoma sold 49K this entire year, F150s sold 63K in April. The money is there but in terms of dealerships they’ve managed to sell 33 each in the 4 months of data. Ford Dealerships sold 51 each in April. That’s not a bad haul but it’s not flying off the shelf by comparison.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    “2014 BMW 640i xDrive coupe: 205 days”

    Somewhat expected. I’d be surprised if the dealers can even tell these models apart anymore. They might not even know they have such a thing in inventory.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Also, the damn thing costs fifty million dollars or something.

      Tehe.

      Too expensive though. ($78,400 starting)

      • 0 avatar
        Chris FOM

        It’s also got the I6. Almost anyone who’s buying a 6 wants the V8. The 650 GC surprises me a bit though, especially as it’s the XDrive model at a point where AWD has become increasingly popular. The M6 ‘vert is also a surprise (most 6ers sold are convertibles). The Q60 surprises me a bit too, at least in the Austin area Infinity Gs are extremely popular. Haven’t seen many Q50/60s yet, but they’re still pretty new.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          I tried to post this above, but got cut off. I suspect many of these cars are sold built to order. They probably never get counted in dealer inventory. My local dealer has one demo 6-er that they have had forever, but all the sales have been orders.

          • 0 avatar
            Chris FOM

            That makes sense too. How many people are buying a $100,000+ M6 off the dealer lot? If I’m dropping that kind of money it’s going to be built precisely how I want it.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Still, BMW has been selling around 9k of the 6 Series (coupe and 4-door) – which is pretty good for the segment and even with discounts/incentives, still fat margins for BMW.

  • avatar
    kvndoom

    Where can you get a full list, top to bottom?

  • avatar
    heavy handle

    Most of the fast sellers are typically special ordered (Range Rover, S Class) or fleet. Add-in new models in short supply and you are left with an interesting list.

    The 640/650 may be a case where BMW forced each dealer to buy one of each spec. Actual sales are so small that one extra car per dealer can skew the stats.

    • 0 avatar
      ellomdian

      ^This. ‘I want a GT, not a convertible, with the small engine but I need AWD.’ I can’t imagine many sales guys pushing that one.

      Having said that, the 650GC xDrive is pretty much the sexiest car that BMW sells that doesn’t have an ‘M’, and I have to imagine that sales are slow because fat-cats are waiting to see what the next 7 looks like before deciding.

  • avatar
    sproc

    Love it or hate it, I’m little surprised the CLA isn’t in the top 20. I thought M-B had struck [fool’s] gold.

    • 0 avatar
      TheyBeRollin

      I thought they were still pre-ordered unicorns and I have yet to see a single one on the road. Considering where I live, they clearly missed. I’d expect to see them around the high school like A3s or being driven by housewives and mistresses, but they’re simply not there.

      • 0 avatar
        sproc

        Perhaps the roll out has regional differences. In the DC metro area, I see a CLA 250 on the road at least daily, if not more often. I haven’t spotted a CLA 45 AMG in the wild yet, though.

      • 0 avatar
        brenschluss

        Strange, the CLA250 instantly started flooding the roads near me. I feel like I already see more of these than any other Mercedes, new or old.

        • 0 avatar
          TheyBeRollin

          The lowest-end ones I see around here are the C-Class.

          I suspect I’ll see some when I go into Seattle at some point or sometime this summer being driven by a tourist. If I see a local with one, I can all-but guarantee it’ll be a CLA45 (sport compact), but I can’t see why anyone would buy one over an S4 (compact executive), considering they’re apples and oranges, unless they were going exclusively for raw hp rating.

          What models are the CLA250s taking market share from in your area?

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    So of the top 10 fastest selling cars, 8 are SUV’s, and 2 are specialty (often custom-ordered) items.

    Americans always display their preferences so clearly. I’m not surprised to see LR at the top there – sounds like they control their dealer inventory very tightly.

  • avatar
    vaujot

    I think the list is too specific. For low-volume sellers like the BMW six series, looking at specific models (e.g. 640 xDrive coupe) will skew the results. How many of those specific models have been sold in the US overall in the relevant time period?

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      That’s a valid point. The 640xD-Coupe is almost a trim level now. The LR’s and WRX only have -one- model variant. They didn’t divide out the LR RR Portfolio and Autobiography etc.

    • 0 avatar
      TrailerTrash

      Wait…what???

      this seems awfully misleading.
      So..if there are fewer dealers, or perhaps the cars are limited in production…then the few that there are sell off fewer lots faster so make them seem faster sellers?
      Ok…that hurt.
      So to look at it another way…it is working against you to have lots of dealers and lots of stock because now your car is listed as not moving fast enough?
      Even though a model like the Escape far outsells the Forester in total numbers…Cars.com used a twisted logic and listed the Forester as a faster seller because there are so limited cars and dealers available???
      Wait…what????

  • avatar
    raresleeper

    Land Rover, huh? I’ll be damned.

    Every third or fourth vehicle spotted in my neighborhood is a MB or Lexus, and even with those demographics I STILL don’t see that many LR’s.

    Suppose the conservatives don’t want to look like basketball players.

    I must confess, I do indeed find the LR4 particularly attractive, even if it is a pork chop.

    • 0 avatar
      VenomV12

      I’m in North Dallas and every other car is a Range Rover or Range Rover Sport, the conservatives love them just fine.

      • 0 avatar
        raresleeper

        Lol

        Don’t you have a Range Rover to be washing?

        Don’t forget to polish the blingy grill with the little Superman Logo thingy. Those are cute.

        • 0 avatar
          VenomV12

          Was that supposed to be funny or some sort of comeback because it was kind of sad. Why don’t you try again and see if you can do better. Also are you attempting to make fun of guys that make more on a one year minimum contract than you will in two careers, because that is also falling flat.

  • avatar
    VenomV12

    If you have ever driven the 640Xi, you would know that the reason it does not sell other than the ludicrous price is that it is a heavy pig, the engine is way too underpowered for that car. You need at least the 650 to make that car move decently. Those Range Rover numbers are BS too, they are all pre-sold so the real number should be 0 days. If the 8 days mean anything it is probably the amount of time it took the owners to get back from vacation and pick up their new cars. That’s basically the same for the new S Class also and the X5. Good luck finding an X5 on the lot to test drive.

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    Hm. No Fords or Chrysler/Fiats in either list, nor any GM sedans. I guess the bulk of the volume cars are in the 19-128 days range, which sounds like a healthy market.

  • avatar
    redliner

    Most of the cars in the low demand list make sense (i.e. convertible, coupe, expensive ) What really stood out is that both the Mitsubishi Outlander and Acura RLX are in the low demand list. Both are four doors and neither is too expensive.

    The Outlander competes in one of the most shopped segments (CUVs) while the RLX is a brand new design. If there is no demand for the RLX now, just imagine 3 years from now when it’s not a new model anymore.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    Thanks for the interesting data, it saved my ass by giving me a topic for my college statistics paper.

    I know Subarus sell pretty well up here in the Northeast, but I didn’t know they sold THAT well.

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      The 2015 Forester and WRX are all-new (that’s why they’re 2015’s), so most sales are probably pre-orders. I’ll bet you the outgoing 2014 Outback sits on the lot much longer.

      • 0 avatar
        bullnuke

        The last generation Foresters didn’t linger on the lot despite the new and improved ’14s arriving. I thought I might deal for one of ’em but they were all gone quickly. Likewise I seriously doubt that many ’14 Outbacks will be sitting around after the launch of the similarly new and improved Outback 2015 models.

  • avatar
    Pebble

    Shame the Outlander is slow selling. I work for a Mitsubishi dealer, and I swear up and down the Outlander is a keen little car, one that deserves to be better known. My wife’s ’05 is at 70K miles now, and (knock on wood) NO major issues. The new ones on our lot are nice for the money.

  • avatar
    7402

    I’m a little skeptical of the data gathering behind these numbers. We have a MINI Cooper S we ordered using the online configurator. We then went to the dealer and wrote them a deposit check, paying the balance when the car arrived almost 10 weeks later. Was this car sold before it was built, or only sold when the sale transaction was completed? It did not spend more than a day or two in the dealer’s possession. Many MINIs are ordered this way.
    .
    We also have a new Subaru Forester (’14) which we bought out of the dealer’s pipeline. The story was that they get the VIN once the car is on the ship (though the story varies from source to source). Sure, the car was on the ship for a while (Japan to Baltimore), then at the port for a few days before being delivered to the dealer. The dealer then turned it around in two days and delivered it when we paid for it. When was this car sold? How many days did it spend on the lot?
    .
    Also, many dealers (most?) will show cars in their inventory after they are delivered so they can offer a similar vehicle when internet shoppers contact them. I’d guess these cars are “on the lot” in the database longer than in reality, though few dealers would care to play this game at the end of the month.

    When do you start counting the days? When do you stop?

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    No 2014 Corolla in the top selling list?? I am surprised, around these parts there are all over the place, you would have thought they have been on sale for over a year now!

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Well, the #20 fast selling car is on the lot for only 18 days, 2-1/2 weeks. The Corolla could be in the 19-20 day range, simply because Toyota insists on including a couple black with black interior models in each batch, even to the sunbelt dealers. Those are slow sellers in Phoenix, especially in the summer.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        “…simply because Toyota insists on including a couple black with black interior models in each batch, even to the sunbelt dealers.”

        I know from experience that such an interior combination is at least bearable in an Oklahoma summer, especially if you get breathable cloth upholstery instead of leather. If I ever decide that I want such a Corolla, I know where to get one now…lol.

  • avatar
    fredtal

    I was expecting to see my 2014 TSX Sport Wagon on the slow list. It has a October inspection sticker and since I bought it in April that’s got to be 150 days on the lot.

  • avatar
    thats one fast cat

    I may not surprise everyone else, but I was a bit shocked by the fact that it takes so long to sell a Jaguar F-type. I’m in DC (the capital now of “hey look at me”) and to be honest I haven’t seen a whole lot of them but I just assumed they were selling them at about the same comparative rate — as a growth percentage of overall sales — that Porsche sells the 911 or Audi sells of the R8. I have a friend that owns the Aston Martin and Lambo dealerships and he told me that ultra-high end cars are just jumping off the lot.

    I guess that means that they haven’t sold enough that I will be able to by a F-Type S for 12-15 cents on the dollar 10 years from now. Bummer.

    • 0 avatar
      7402

      “DC (the capital now of “hey look at me”)”

      I moved to metro DC from Los Angeles. DC doesn’t hold a candle to LA in this category.

    • 0 avatar
      VenomV12

      F-Types are really not selling well at all, and I don’t know why. I don’t see many in South Beach, Vegas, Chicago or Dallas, handful here and there. I think I see about 300 911s for every F-Type. The same goes for the new Corvette Stingray, supposedly tons are being sold, but I almost never see any of the road. The dealer by me has 3 new convertible Stingrays sitting in the showroom right now.

    • 0 avatar
      sproc

      There was a lovely F-Type S on display at the British Embassy open house this past Saturday. It was practically a wallflower, though, parked next to an orange McLaren 650S Spider. That thing is sex on wheels. My wife had to pry me off of it at the point where I started babbling about how beautiful the brake calipers were…

      • 0 avatar
        hubcap

        The McLaren 650S Spyder is pure, unadulterated car porn. And orange with gunmetal wheels would be my color of choice.

        Just wondering Sproc, I’m guessing you’re in the Navy. What do you do?

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    I’m a bit surprised about the 6-Series Gran Coupe. I’m seeing many of them in my area, which isn’t in a particularly prominent region.

    • 0 avatar
      darkwing

      A couple weeks back, one of my local dealers was practically begging me to take one off their hands; I guess that explains why. (I don’t think it helps that the two they have are white/white and white/red. Seriously?)

      What surprised me, though, was how tough it is to find one with active cruise control. The thing’s meant to be a grand tourer, right? What kind of grand tourer in 2014 doesn’t come with active cruise?

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        More alarmingly, why wouldn’t it have it at that price point?

        • 0 avatar
          darkwing

          The thing that makes it really surprising, to me at least, is that the lease special they advertise online is actually pretty well equipped. The active cruise is just an add-on to a package the car already has.

          Maybe they’re trying to keep the fine-print price under $100K?

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Selling around 9k/yr (for both the 2 and 4-door) is pretty good for the segment.

  • avatar
    galaxygreymx5

    I’m shocked that the Cadillac ELR isn’t on the slowest-selling list. Automotive News says they have 735 days of inventory of the stupid thing.

    • 0 avatar
      snakebit

      Don’t be shocked.

      It probably didn’t make the list this time because it hasn’t been for sale all that long. Coincidentally, the Sunday New York Times evaluated the ELR in their Automotive page two days ago. They concluded that for the cost of the $82,135 ELR, you’d have to drive it 240,000 miles to save enough petrol expense to make up for not buying the 2014 CTS Coupe at only $40,000 base price.

      So, check back when the next version of the list is published.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        It might be they didn’t make the list because they didn’t sell enough of them. I doubt anyone would buy one to recoup gas expenses. I just wonder if the in your face ads were too much. Buying one might make the owner a target of the PC crowd.

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