By on May 3, 2019

best running boards for trucks

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Here’s a tidbit of trivia for you. At a recent truck event, your author was told by an OEM engineer that running boards actually help, not hurt, fuel economy. Preliminary wind tunnel testing allegedly showed that the boards direct the air in such a way as to create something of an air curtain along the side of the truck, effectively creating a streamline effect and reducing turbulence. Scything a cleaner path through the air saves fuel. Take from that anecdote what you will.

If nothing else, running boards help the vertically challenged amongst us to hoist themselves up into the cab of a pickup without needing to deploy a rope ladder or load themselves into a trebuchet. There is an argument that they help improve the truck’s worth at resale time, but your author is not so sure of that assertion, having owned several pickups both with and without running boards. Cash will fly out the window no matter what.

Alert readers will note we’ve selected running boards which fit various iterations of the mighty Ford F-150. We chose a single pickup truck for continuity’s sake and, since the F-Series is America’s best-selling vehicle, we figured it’d be a logical selection. Most, if not all, of the boards in the following post are available for pickups without a Blue Oval on their nose.

(Read More…)

By on December 12, 2013

IMG_0271

Gordon Buehrig’s design of the Cord 810/812 was revolutionary for its day. One innovation was that it lacked running boards, something automobiles had featured almost since the dawn of the motoring age. I’m guessing that the origin of running boards has to do with the fact that in the early days car bodies were typically mounted right on top exposed frame rails, putting the body up high, and the running boards were used as step to get up into the interior. From a design standpoint, they also visually connected the front and rear fenders, creating one flowing line. What was stylish in 1913, though, wasn’t necessarily au courant in the mid 1930s. Also automotive design started getting more formally established in the 1930s, with GM and Ford both having in-house design staffs by the end of that decade. Based on the then young science of aerodynamics and the related streamlined aesthetic, new shapes started appearing on cars. (Read More…)

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