By on December 2, 2015

StateLibQld_1_119880_Traffic_congestion_on_Kingsford_Smith_Drive_at_Hamilton,_1954

Probably not. 

According to a study by the National League of Cities, only 6 percent of future city plans consider the potential impact autonomous vehicles will have in the next few years, including driverless car lanes and scaling back parking as ride-share services become more popular.

The study collected transportation plans of the 50 biggest U.S. cities, as well as the most-populous cities in every state. In all, 69 city plans were amassed and studied for future traffic and road plans.

Despite automakers rushing to put autonomous cars on the road by 2020, the study suggests that many cities won’t be able to adequately accommodate those cars, nor will they adapt fast enough to changing transportation modes that may challenge conventional public transportation and infrastructure wisdom.

(Read More…)

Recent Comments

  • bullnuke: They’re built in the mother country (Japan).
  • millerluke: I have a 2019 Camry with the 2.5L. It’s rated for around 7.2 L/100km, and I routinely get around...
  • slap: I started college the year this generation of GM intermediate cars came out. The previous generation had some...
  • msquare: This was indeed the spiritual successor to the Grand Am, which was dropped about the same time the Chevelle...
  • Peter Gazis: Trump is sitting on over 8000 ventilators. While his home state of New York is putting 2 people on...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Timothy Cain
  • Matthew Guy
  • Ronnie Schreiber
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth