By on July 13, 2018

 

TTAC Commentator Sam Hell Jr writes:

A few questions in follow-up to the discussion of blind-spots and glare… I drive a current-gen Malibu and live in a fairly well-heeled suburb on the edge of farmland, so a lot of my miles are coming on unlit roads surrounded by extra-tall SUVs and and extra-legally illuminated pickups. (With special commendation for the tailgating lifted Ram driver who, upon seeing me adjust my rearview mirror to avoid his aftermarket LED glare, flipped on the high-beams. Boo this man!)

The Malibu’s left sideview mirror adjustment is fairly limited, meaning I’ve still got to check over my shoulder around the driver-side B-pillar before changing lanes, even with the mirror at its widest angle. (Read More…)

By on July 6, 2018

headlight

Looooooongtime TTAC reader Robin writes:

Even after all these years on the road (driving since 1972) there are still situations that raise the hackles on my my neck. This is my cautionary tale.

The other day I was on 75, heading south to Dallas, from McKinney. It was around 6:00 a.m., a good hour before sunrise. I like to stay in the next-to-the-outside lane, leaving the furthest right hand lane for drivers entering the freeway. So I began my scan to move over one.

Immediately behind me was a late model, full-sized truck. They are high enough that those headlights pretty much flood my rear vision. I could see that he was NOT attempting to overtake me, either. But there was something in my field of vision. It was vague, flooded out by those projector headlights. I hesitated before moving. And sure enough, here came a guy on a motorcycle, passing us all. He was not driving recklessly at all. Yet I could not see him for the briefest instant as he traversed through the glare of those projector beams.

I don’t know what would have transpired, we were all tucked in pretty damned closely.

Bottom line is, no matter how safely one is operating their vehicle, no matter how safely everyone else is operating, it only takes a literal second for things to go sideways. (Read More…)

By on June 13, 2017

SUV Headlight, Public Domain

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety has been systematically tearing apart every segment over inadequate headlights for the past year. In its most recent study, midsize SUVs took a beating, with only two models garnering a “good” rating for their illumination capabilities. The other 35 continued a trend of providing lackluster performance from a safety standpoint — especially non-luxury offerings.

Lousy headlights are something the IIHS seems hellbent on calling out, especially after years of avoiding any heavy scrutiny. This is the fourth segment the institute has evaluated since it began rating headlights in 2016. Its newly established headlight ratings have resulted in fewer cars being awarded an IIHS Top Safety Pick+, as headlights must rate in the “good” or “acceptable” range to even be considered. (Read More…)

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