By on July 9, 2019

After Volkswagen admitted to equipping some of its diesel-powered autos with illegal software designed to circumvent emissions testing in 2015, every automaker on the planet fell under enhanced scrutiny. By 2016, U.S. regulators were checking on Mercedes-parent Daimler to see if there were any pollutant-related shenanigans taking place behind the scenes. Germany followed suit shortly thereafter, launching its own investigation.

However, with no local updates on the matter, it was presumed Daimler was in the clear — except Germany did find evidence of corporate misdeeds and the company recalled 3 million vehicles in 2017. At the time, we figured the situation would swiftly bleed over into the United States and help wrap things up. But it hasn’t yet and The Detroit News took time this month to ponder what’s taking federal regulators so long.  (Read More…)

Recent Comments

  • Rnaboz: Chris, I don’t have I-pass either. However, when going to my sister in WI, we note toll # and time....
  • Lockstops: That was already part of VW’s cover-up campaign. It’s perfectly legal for cars to have higher...
  • 285exp: “China’s CO2 emissions grew by approximately 3% last year, the largest rise since at least 2013, and...
  • Peter Gazis: Deadweight •The Chevy Sonic is MADE IN THE USA • It is the ONLY subcompact MADE IN THE USA • GM employs...
  • pwrwrench: My father had a Tiger, which replaced a TR4A. He did not like the Triumph very much because he found it...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States