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Old 01-22-2014, 10:32 AM   #1 (permalink)
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My girlfriend inherieted this sweet 1941 Graham Hollywood from her grandpa.* He bought it in 1943.* This little known car is based on the body of the Cord 810, except it has a different nose, headlights, and is RWD.* It was available with a supercharged inline 6, but this one doesn't have the supercharger. It hasn't been started in 2 years and I told her they need to be driven now and then.* We drained the gas, changed the oil and coolant, sprayed some penetrating oil into each cylinder and turned it over a few times, charged the Optima battery, and filled the carb bowl and it started right up.* Here's a video of the first start! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9nMt8VJvP3w I'm not sure why it died, but we couldn't get it to restart even after refilling the carb.* Fouled plugs?* It has an aux electric fuel pump, but neither it or the mechanical pump seems to be moving gas.* I think I'll disconnect the lines from the pumps and carb and blow air through them, and test the electric pump with a little bottle of fuel on a short hose.* It's possible the carb float is stuck in the up position, not allowing any fluid to flow.* The throat of the carb looks nice and clean inside.* Any ideas? Once we get the fuel issue solved it should be a driver, so not really much of a "project car".* Cool photos to come once she sees daylight.
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Old 01-23-2014, 05:30 AM   #2 (permalink)
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Gummed up gas in the lines? Clogged fuel filter? I had a old motor home that sat for a few decades and the pickup screen tank was clogged. That was a pretty extreme case of gas gone bad though 9about everything was clogged). Should still run if a fuel is introduced manually into the carburetor, or pull the input line off the carb and gravity feed gas the in.



Or you just flooded it. If that's starting fluid you're using, that's a great way to burn a engine up and/or start a fire.



Anytime I have anything sitting for awhile I pour a gallon of two of diesel in the tank, and let it sit for a day, then come back and fill the rest up with fresh gas.





Anyways, that's a nice looking car.
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Old 01-23-2014, 07:07 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Hmmm...maybe it's the gas lines.* There was only about 1.5 gallons 18 month old gas in the tank.* I got rid of it, but it didn't seem that bad.* I guess I'll blow air through the lines and see if I hear bubbles in the tank.* The lines around the carb are all copper, but maybe I can rig something up.* That run was from filling the bowl manually.



It's carb cleaner.* How would starting fluid "burn up" the engine?* I was wearing eye protection in case of a backfire, but there's not much to burn up under that hood.* Just the radiator hoses, belt, and sparkplug wires.* Nevertheless, a fire extinguisher was on hand.



Why do you pour in diesel?
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Old 01-23-2014, 08:32 AM   #4 (permalink)
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That's a really nice car, I really hope you're careful with it..... since it was free, why not send it to a professional to have checked out and refreshed?



Starting fluid can burn a hole right through your piston. It's very combustible, it burns very hot, it can do damage. One time I had a backfire while spraying some starting fluid down a old Chevelle in about the same scenario you are. Car backfired, set my hand, sleeve, can, and the carburetor on fire. Carb cleaner is somewhat better, but I rather let the stuff soak in diesel or kerosene. Still, that stuff isn't made to run an engine off of.



Diesel? It's a good cleaning agent and detergent. It does good at dissolving old gas, dump it in the crank case to clean out sludge, let it sit on top of the engine and clean up carbon. It's some good stuff, and you'll never notice a 10% or so of it mixed in your gas, especially in a old car. It's what I've done in all my old cars that's been sitting, or every spring when it's time to fire up the small engine yard equipment.
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