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Old 02-05-2014, 08:00 AM   #1 (permalink)
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I really enjoy the Junkyard Finds column; it is what introduced me to the TTAC in the first place, and I enjoy every post.

It would be neat to see what the B&B are finding in the way of junked/abandoned cars as well; along with the finds in CA and CO.¬* Someone mentioned spotting a Chrysler Airflow in a junkyard, would love to see that, just as an example.

There is farm that butts up to my back fence.¬* For whatever reason, the farmer who owns it loves to collect old stuff on his property.¬* I have only seen one car removed; the rest just sit there and slowly rot away.

A couple of school buses, a Chevy van, a 1980s Cougar.¬* An old GM station wagon; and of course old pickup trucks.¬* An Opel as well; I don't want to know what it looks like inside that half rotted travel trailer.¬* A pair of massive old engines from a cotton gin are at least under a tin roof.

There is a field I drive past every day that has three old cars sitting in it.¬* One I recognized as an early Olds Toronado; the other two are from the 1930s.¬* After looking at them daily for several months now; I realized yesterday that the one in the middle may be a Chrysler Airflow.¬* Will look more closely in the next few days, and if that is the case, see if I can't take pictures of all three; I have read about the Airflow in books going back to my childhood; but this will be the first one I have seen in person; even if it just a carcasse.

Only problem is that while you can post pictures with this forum; they show up as thumbnails, and clicking on them does not enlarge them.¬* (I have tried with IE under Windows, I believe Chrome under Windows, and Safari on the iPhone; none work.)¬* That would have to be fixed first.
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Old 02-05-2014, 08:16 AM   #2 (permalink)
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I'm pretty sure at some point old school buses were cheaper to acquire than sheds, which would explain why they are so prevalent among those who, ahem, collect.

Living in a newer part of suburbia I don't get to see a lot of neglected/abandoned cars. Where/when I grew up they were everywhere¬*(the number of bandit Trans Ams I saw rotting away would make people cry today).

As for pictures on here, I found the only way I can enlarge them at all is through Firefox. You have to right click and select "View Image." And even then, they aren't full sized. I wonder if it would be easier to make us host the photos elsewhere and link to them. Though I never have luck seeing anyone's Photobucket albums.
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Old 02-05-2014, 09:09 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Land Ark said ... As for pictures on here, I found the only way I can enlarge them at all is through Firefox. You have to right click and select "View Image." And even then, they aren't full sized. I wonder if it would be easier to make us host the photos elsewhere and link to them. Though I never have luck seeing anyone's Photobucket albums. When I posted my pictures of my diecast collection for you; I tried using both my Flickr account and the same picture host that Facebook uses (just linked directly to the images through the URL); the results were basically the same.
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Old 02-05-2014, 10:54 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Interesting, I hadn't tried anything other than clicking the little tree icon. Which, clicking on it again shows that you DO have to host your own photos anyway. So, yup, I'm at a loss. Something with how this forum software nests photos shrinky-dinks them.

It's still an improvement over the photo posting on the regular comment section!

I'd be interested if anyone who frequents here has no idea what we're talking about and sees enlarged photos just fine.
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Old 02-05-2014, 11:25 AM   #5 (permalink)
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It is something in the forum setup; I have shared pictures in other forums this way and with these sites,¬*and had no problems.

Tried embedding a video; but iframes are not allowed.¬* I think that is the root cause; the forum settings are not allowing iframes; so properly formatted multimedia will not work.
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Old 02-11-2014, 08:08 AM   #6 (permalink)
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I have seen a trio of cars sitting in a field in Grand Prairie ever since I started commuting to my new job.¬* But, a recent brush fire revealed them in all of their glory; and just last week, I realized the one in the middle is a 1936 Chrysler Airflow; with a 1966 Oldsmobile Toronado on one side and what I think is a 1940s Chevrolet Delux on the other. The chrome strip on the side helped date it to 1936; I would have to measure the wheelbase to see if it is a CV8 or maybe an Imperial CV10.¬* Notice the front and back doors are the same, just turned around.¬* The engine sat directly over the front axle, while the rear seat was ahead of the rear axle, giving it a modern 55/45 weight distribution.¬* Along with leaf springs on all four wheels, it gave it an unusually smooth ride for it's time; even with the primitive solid beam front axle. The trunk helped me to date it to 1936; the 1934-1935 Airflows did not have one. You can see how it was welded in place. The Airflow dashboard had the steering wheel in the middle, a glove box on each side, and the guages in the now-empty holes on each side of where the steering column was. Cars of the 1920s-1930s had canvas roofs because they did not have stamping machines capabile of forming something as large as a roof with the compound curve to it. By 1937 they could, but Chrysler could not afford to retool the Airflow's roof, so a steel plug was inserted where the canvas roof used to be. At a time when most carmakers mounted their headlights on top of the fenders, the Airflow had it's headlights flush mounted in the nose.¬* The Airflow had a drag coefficient of 0.50 at a time when most cars were around 0.74 (and were more aerodynamic if driven backwards), today's cars are around 0.30. Chrysler's straight eight with an aluminum head would have been fitted; it produced 112-145HP depending on the size of the engine, which depended on trim level. Notice the remaining solid front axle, which sat directly under the engine.
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