By on March 7, 2022

1972 Ford Galaxie 500 sedan in Colorado junkyard, RH front view - ©2022 Murilee Martin - The Truth About Cars1972 ended up being the final year for the postwar era of mainstream American car shoppers buying big, cheap sedans with few misgivings about fuel economy (though, if you want to get picky about it, you could say the 1973 Oil Crisis began while 1974 models were already in showrooms). Full-sized Fords sold very well in 1972, with close to a half-million Customs, Galaxies, and LTDs sold that year (plus better than 75,000 units of the Marquis and Monterey), and these cars were commonplace on American roads well into the 1990s. Today, the 1971-1972 big Fords and their distinctive snouts have all but disappeared, so I was happy to find this extremely green example in a Denver-area yard last month.


The second Dirty Harry movie, 1973’s “Magnum Force,” features some of the finest chase scenes involving a 1972 full-sized Ford ever put on celluloid. Everyone knows about the wild San Francisco chase that starts on the now-demolished Embarcadero Freeway and ends next to the about-to-be-scrapped USS Badoeng Strait at Pier 54, featuring Hal Holbrook’s ’72 Custom 500 taking more abuse than even Jake and Elwood’s ’74 Dodge Monaco.


That’s not the only 1972 full-sized Ford with an important role in this film, however; Harry’s unmarked police cruiser is a handsome ’72 Galaxie 500, and his civilian car is a snazzy ’72 LTD convertible.

1972 Ford Galaxie 500 sedan in Colorado junkyard, interior - ©2022 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsThe Galaxie 500 fell about in the middle of the big Ford lineup, with the MSRP starting at $3,685 (about $25,210 in 2022 dollars) for today’s Junkyard Find. At the low end, you had the Custom sedan ($3,288), while the king of 1972 full-sized Ford sedans was the $4,050 LTD Brougham.

1972 Ford Galaxie 500 sedan in Colorado junkyard, 400M engine - ©2022 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsTheoretically, you could get a 240-cubic-inch (3.9-liter) straight-six engine in a Custom or Galaxie, but it appears that you had to be a fleet buyer for that; civilian buyers got a 351-cubic-inch (5.7-liter) Cleveland V8 as the base engine and could cheap out with a 302-cubic-inch Windsor V8 for a price discount. This car has the optional Cleveland-based 400 (6.5-liter) V8, rated at 172 horsepower and priced at just $95 extra (that’s about $650 today). The 400 used in the ’71 big Fords had an official rating of 260 horses; a bit of the power difference between the two model years came from an emissions-mandated compression-ratio drop (from 9.0:1 down to 8.5:1), but most of it came from the government-mandated (the California government, that is) switch from gross to net horsepower ratings, which took full effect in the 1972 model year.

Interestingly, the air cleaner— or at least the air cleaner lid— in this car came from a Ford truck with the never-installed-in-cars 360 V8 engine (Chrysler and AMC also had 360s at this time, but the checkered-flag sticker identifies this cleaner as a late-1960s Ford product). It was easy to swap air cleaner assemblies on vehicles back then since so many of them used the same carburetors.

1972 Ford Galaxie 500 sedan in Colorado junkyard, interior - ©2022 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsThis car was in very nice condition when it arrived in the junkyard, with no rust anywhere and an interior that shows all the signs of having been in a garaged car for most of its life. The bumpers and most of the trim look near-perfect, and the few body dents appear to have happened after it entered the junkyard ecosystem.

It doesn’t take much imagination to picture it around the time that G. Gordon Liddy’s operatives were breaking into DNC headquarters at the Watergate Hotel, with a beehived young lady sporting the latest fashions behind the wheel. Yes, the 1972 Galaxie 500 was a lot of car for the money (though this one has a curb weight of only 3,826 pounds, just a couple hundred pounds more than a new Escape and quite a few less than a new Edge).

1972 Ford Galaxie 500 sedan in Colorado junkyard, instrument panel - ©2022 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsIs it possible that this car has traveled a mere 5,770 miles during its 50-year life? I suppose so, but my money is on a pampered 105,770 miles (or perhaps a speedometer cable that broke early in life). Not many US-market cars made it to the six-figure mileage mark back then, and so you’d only find six-digit odometers in Volvos and Mercedes-Benzes. Note the automatic transmission, which was standard equipment on full-sized Fords in 1972. GM put a slushbox as base equipment in (non-fleet) full-sized Chevrolets that year, too, as did Chrysler with the big Plymouth Fury and American Motors with the Ambassador.

1972 Ford Galaxie 500 sedan in Colorado junkyard, HVAC controls - ©2022 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsAir conditioning didn’t become standard equipment on non-oligarch-grade American cars until decades later, though most buyers of Detroit full-sized sedans forked over the extra cash for refrigerated air by the early 1970s. The list price on A/C for this car was 409 bones, or clams (that’s about 2,800 spondulix today, so think about that next time you complain about the included-in-MSRP A/C in your new $14,645 Mitsubishi Mirage needing several minutes to cool down the interior on a hot day).

1972 Ford Galaxie 500 sedan in Colorado junkyard, RH rear view - ©2022 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsI feel something of a personal connection to this car, and not just because these things were everywhere when I was a kid. The build tag tells me that it rolled off the Twin Cities Assembly Plant in St. Paul, Minnesota, in June of 1972. I graduated from kindergarten in Minneapolis that month, just on the other side of the Mississippi from the now-demolished Twin Cities Assembly, and my grandparents down in Winona drove a ’68 Ford LTD coupe (the generation before the 1969-1974 big Ford but philosophically similar) at that time.

1972 Ford Galaxie 500 sedan in Colorado junkyard, interior - ©2022 Murilee Martin - The Truth About Cars
My stoic Luxembourgish grandfather had become a Ford man decades earlier when the Great Car Shortage of 1945-1946 put him into the only new car he could find: a genuinely wretched Crosley. He bought a new Ford as soon as he could and never looked back. Meanwhile, one of his teenage cousins back in the old country had fought the Nazis in the Belgian Resistance, transporting ammunition in a Ford Model T during the Battle of the Bulge, and he went on to open a Ford repair shop in Arlon a few years later. Naturally, when my father got his first new car (technically a company car, but he was allowed to choose it), family tradition dictated that it be a 1967 Ford Custom two-door sedan with 289 and three-on-the-floor manual transmission.

1972 Ford Galaxie 500 sedan in Colorado junkyard, front view - ©2022 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsFor links to more than 2,200 additional Junkyard Finds (and plenty of the authentic Murilee Martin Car Story Digressions you get with them), head over to The Junkyard Home of the Murilee Martin Lifestyle Brand™.


Those demanding Galaxie 500 customers literally pounded their fists on the desks of the suits in Dearborn, insisting on power steering at no extra cost, if we are to treat this TV commercial as a documentary.

[Images courtesy of the author]

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70 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 1972 Ford Galaxie 500 Sedan...”


  • avatar
    Land Ark

    Great one Murilee, thank you!

    Cars like this only trigger one thought for me, massive pile ups in episodes of CHiPs.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    This one seems too sweet to wind up in the scrap yard. I could see some kid scoring max cool points rolling up to the local high school in this rig. Major bench seat and paradise by the dashboard light.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      These Fords have boxed frames. At the front of the frame where it would join the front “torque box” that supported the front subframe was a little rubber valve to let moisture out. These routinely became brittle or got plugged and stop working. Water would build up and rust the frame. I ran across many of these with rusted out frames that broke.
      On an interesting side note, the frames on the 60’s/70’s era Custom/Galaxie/XL/LTD are very close to that of the Crown Vic. I’ve seen conversions where the Crown Vic chassis has been swapped into these cars.

  • avatar
    CaddyDaddy

    Hal Holbrook stated that Clint Eastwood did all of his own stunt driving while Hal was in the car. Hal said that Clint scared him so much with his driving prowess, he hit the floorboards.

    IMO at this time, Ford was putting out the best full size cars. GM’s cost cutting was really starting to be seen with structural rigidity issues, poor vinyl top design causing drainage to create scrap yard sending rust issues down deep in the rear quarter panels and garbage like the 400ci small block.

    • 0 avatar
      MRF 95 T-Bird

      You’re right about GM cost cutting with their 71-76 full size cars. Their 65-70 full sizers seemed far better.
      An great uncle of mine a long time Oldsmobile 98 owner had vinyl top rust bubbling and rear backlight trim issues on his 76 Oldsmobile 98 Regency. My family had a 73 Impala sport coupe that had similar issues along with door windows that would rattle. Our 76 Eldorado was fairly good except for some fit and finish issues.

      That 75-76 Thunderbird parked next to this Galaxie just screams episode of Cannon staring William Conrad.

  • avatar
    Pianoboy57

    Yes, one of my favorites. One of my teenage dream cars was the LTD ragtop in yellow over white. As for hardtops my favorite was the ’70 LTD with the hidden headlights.

    I noticed the owner sprang for the right door mirror. I never understand way those behemoths didn’t have right side mirrors as standard. My grandma’s ’72 LTD had a low fuel light. I’ve always wondered if that was standard then. I did end up with a ’66 Galaxie 2dr hardtop as my first car. What a gas drinker that was.

    Another movie that featured a lot of Fords was The Omega Man. A beautiful red on red ’70 ragtop was crashed in the opening scenes. I’m not sure if that car was an LTD or an XL.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Ah, yes, “The Omega Man” – Charlton Heston cruising around L.A. in a shiny red convertible on a beautiful morning, listening to “A Summer Place,” looking for zombies to kill.

      Lord, I miss early ’70s cinema.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @Pianoboy57 – what engine and rear end gearing did you have in your ’68? My ’68 with 4 barrel 390 (10.5:1 compression/315 hp) was geared very tall. It would get 24 mpg (Imperial) on the highway if you stayed around 60 mph.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      I remember the low-fuel light in the red Ford that went into the vice that was tectonic plates in “Superman.” Although I’m sure the blinking was for dramatic effect!

      If I recall correctly, in one of the scene cuts in that movie, the car suddenly sported a pillared hardtop!

      This is when the big cars from each manufacturer were simply Ford, Chevy, Chrysler, and not LTD, Caprice Classic, or Newport.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    A shed a tear reading this. This site’s ownership ran an article this week on supplying vehicles for movie sets. Seems that these ‘pedestrian’ models are the hardest to find. And this one seems to have been entirely salvageable/restorable. And those prices! So much car for that money. And at least in my opinion an attractive vehicle. These Fords certainly sold well. Primarily in this shade of green or in brown. Unfortunately early 1970’s Ford started rusting when they rolled off the assembly line. 80,000 Ontarians receiving a voucher from Ford or payment towards repairs of about $300 each, to settle a class action lawsuit regarding prematurely rusting 1971 to 1975 Ford products.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff S

      @Arthur–Adam on Rare Classics tells you why these large sedans although made in larger numbers than the coupes did not survive and that is one reason he seeks out pristine low mileage examples of these cars to buy and keep for posterity. He has a video on the production numbers of these cars and how many are in existence of today of each model. Full size sedans at the time vastly out number the 2 doors but today there are more survivor Mustangs, Camaros, and Challengers than these. Adam has some beautiful examples of full size Fords, Mercurys, Chevies, Olds, Pontiac, Buicks, Chryslers, Imperials, and has several Lincoln Marks all in showroom condition. This Galaxy would most likely have parts to be used in the restoration of a coupe or convertible otherwise it is not worth spending the money to put it back on the road.

      • 0 avatar
        CaddyDaddy

        Jeff – Rare Classic Cars is one of the best vehicle blogs on YouTube Flat Out!

        • 0 avatar
          Jeff S

          Adam really knows his stuff. He would be a good interview for TTAC’s podcast.

        • 0 avatar
          sgeffe

          Absolutely! I wish I knew how he finds all those survivors! With few exceptions, all of his cars look like they just drove home from the showroom! And even the higher-mileage examples are all-original!

          The most intriguing one I’ve seen, for whatever reason, is a spotless 1984 Olds Omega Brougham Sedan. One of those “why would you bother” cars! Closer to the point of this article is a 1973 Galaxie 500 hardtop sedan with no options except ** automatic climate control! ** (And the Marti Report confirms it was a factory order! Just like the base 1982 Ciera that was on here in the last year or two that had only a tilt wheel and cruise control, but no A/C or anything else!)

          • 0 avatar
            Jeff S

            He gets some of them on Facebook Marketplace, Craig’s List, but more recently he gets them word of mouth. He says many times the owner is original and is more concerned with the car they lovingly cared for during the past 40 to 60 years goes to someone who will take care of it and appreciate it. Adam has a video on that as well and he says he is very respectful to these people when he looks at their cars because he understands how important they are to them. He also says these are forgotten because most people will not preserve a sedan and most collectors want the Chevelle SS, 442s, Mustangs, Camaros, Challengers, and other 2 door cars preferably muscle cars. I like Adam’s calmness and his everyday guy demeanor.

          • 0 avatar
            sgeffe

            I’ve seen some of those videos. Lately, his “porch chats” have been food for thought, especially with the “badge engineering” at GM, and the constraints which impacted some of that stuff, some of which shouldn’t be laid at the feet of the bean counters.

        • 0 avatar
          mdoore

          agreed! I would love to hang out with that guy for a week. He has a sweet collection.

      • 0 avatar
        spookiness

        I have a deep crush on Adam and Rare Classic Cars. It’s like we’re soul mates.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      I made a comment up thread about the frames on these. The front of the frame was prone to rust due to a poor vent valve. Ford obviously fixed the frame problem since Crown Vic’s have essentially the same frame.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        Ford fixed the problem with a solution they had all along. Ford owned the patent on a postive/negative charge rustproofing dip for years, but didn’t get around to installing it in all their plants until 1982.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @Lorenzo – but that would cost pennies a vehicle more. LOL. Years ago I had looked at getting some parts cleaned in a non-destructive bath that worked like that but in reverse. They then would coat the part electrostatically. Most of their work was with airplane parts.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    This car brings back memories of a friend in college that had a 1971 LTD 2 door hardtop. He abused that car in every which way possible and it kept going on. At that time it was just 3 or 4 years old but that car was smooth.

  • avatar
    kcflyer

    I’ve said it before but the correct name for Ford’s newest EV would have been Galex-E. Not Mustang Mach E.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff S

      Maybe Ford will still use the Galaxy name. Would be a good name for a larger EV crossover. Ford had some great names as did GM and Chrysler during the 50s, 60s, and 70s.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @Jeff S – Galaxie (I E) not Galaxy (Y).

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          Ford has used Galaxy with a Y for years in a European-market minivan based on the CD4 (Fusion) platform. They just discontinued it this year.

        • 0 avatar
          Jeff S

          Ok thanks.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Jeff S – I’m a big fan of Ford cars. My first and only car was/is a 1968 Galaxie 500.

          • 0 avatar
            Jeff S

            @Lou–I was mostly a fan of GMs especially Chevies but I always liked these 60s and early 70s full size Fords and Mercurys up until the 73 which was ugly and didn’t handle that well. In my oil company days when these cars were new or not that old I drove a number of 76 thru 78 Galaxies, LTDs, and Grand Marquis the handling was very bad but the ride quality was good. Overall they were good cars but the earlier models much much better. After driving a new downsize 77 Impala with a 4 barrel 350 these Fords didn’t compare.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    To add to the 70’s police film and television genre Karl Malden with his partner a young Michael Douglass also drove a 71-72 Galaxy 500 sedan in the television drama Streets of San Francisco. It seemed to handle the hilly terrain fairly well.
    The Quinn-Martin producers were big on Ford and Lincoln Mercury vehicles since they were a sponsor.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      These cars were coil spring on all 4 corners. The rear was a 5 link coil spring. They were available with a large front sway bar and front disc brakes. They actually rode nice, body roll was better than one would expect. The brakes were decent for the era.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        The body roll was not as bad on the 72s and earlier but it was really noticeable on the 73s to 78s. I got use to it but it was noticeable especially after driving the treasurer of my company’s 77 Impala with a 350 4 barrel V-8 which handled the turns much better. I didn’t like the downsized full sized GMs until I actually drove one. It was basically the same thing when the downsized fox bodied 79 LTDs and Grand Marquis came out they were much better handling than the prior generation.

  • avatar
    eng_alvarado90

    As someone in his early 30s, I’ve never seen many of these in person.
    Despite living in the west coast were rust is pretty much non-existant, it looks like the full sized D3 cars were pretty much gone by the late 80s/early 90s. I can relate seeing more Mavericks, Pintos, F-bodies and Mustang IIs, though.

    This looked like it was cared for its whole life, perhaps by an elderly owner who garaged it, maintained it and lightly drove it to church on Sundays until he/she passed and the family wanted nothing to do with a 50yr old car.

    I’m not sure if this is worth saving as it’s a 4dr, but the 2dr hardtops and ragtops were definitely lookers.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Galaxie’s, XL’s, LTD’s are gaining popularity in the Fastback and 2 door coupe configuration especially with more rare engine packages like the Fe block 427 side oiler, Fe 390 (police interceptor/GT engine), and Fe 428 (police or performance).
      Part of the reason for the increased popularity is that if you can find one, they aren’t priced as high as Mustangs and Cougars. The only Galaxie’s that are expensive are the early 60’s models with the 427 side oiler especially paired with the “top loader’ 4 speed. Those are in the $400-500k USD range.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        Those were nice and I always liked the 63 and 64 Galaxie 500 XLT 2 and 4 door hardtop models with bucket seats and a center console and the hardtop with creases that mimicked a convertible top. I remember as a kid a few friends parents had those cars and they were stunning. Also remember in Cub Scouts I road in one of the cubs father’s 59 Ford Sunliner and he put the hardtop down for us. The Sunliners were made from MY 1957 thru 1959 and are worth some serious money. They were very cool cars.

  • avatar
    Russycle

    ” Not many US-market cars made it to the six-figure mileage mark back then, and so you’d only find six-digit odometers in Volvos and Mercedes-Benzes.”

    I’m not sure that’s true, as far US cars not lasting. My 65 Mustang had well over 100K before it threw the timing chain, and my dad’s 72 Suburban had over 200k when it did the same. A morning’s wrenching and it was back on the road. Neither of those cars was babied.

    Admittedly this was in SoCal, so the rust monster wasn’t much of an issue. Cars built in the 50’s didn’t last long, I think retaining the 5-digit odo was a product of Detroit inertia as much as anything.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      “Admittedly this was in SoCal…”

      Well, there’s your explanation.

    • 0 avatar
      Roberto Esponja

      His assumption is wrong. The only reason for the 5 digit odometers was cost-savings. I know, because I was in the auto business. Bean counters figured they saved “X” amount of pennies by going with a 5 digit versus a six digit odometer. That was the only (narrow minded) reason, it didn’t have anything to do with durability.

    • 0 avatar
      mdoore

      Actually most of them lasted well over 100k miles. It was common practice to roll back the odometers in those days.

  • avatar
    Roader

    Wikipedia:

    Approximately 7,850,000 full-size Fords and Mercurys were sold over 1968–1978.[35][36] This makes it the second best selling Ford automobile platform after the Ford Model T.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      There are those who’ll argue that the Crown Vic is just an extension of the full-sized Ford car line. Panther frame swaps are easy to do with any of these Ford cars.

  • avatar
    ajla

    But things ain’t so bad ’cause I got a Galaxie 500.

  • avatar
    KOKing

    Even here in SoCal, these ‘big nose’ Fords are pretty much nonexistent these days. The dad of my best friend as a little kid in the early 80s had a Country Squire from this period, complete with woodgrain and the wayback seats. What a time…

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    Always sad to see decent examples awaiting their turn at the shredder. A shame four door cars are so unloved. With gas prices where they are, no one’s going to daily one of these, but it’d be cool to see this old fuel swilling behemoths get the power and economy of todays powertrains or even an electric swap. If I had unlimited room and money….

  • avatar
    drnoose

    Rust is what killed off all these cars. Ford did a terrible job of rust-proofing their cars compared to GM. You are much more likely to come across just about any other car from this period before you will see a Ford.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff S

      Rust got the GMs and Chryslers of this era as well. The early Japanese vehicles rusted as well. Today’s vehicles are much better with the anti corrosion coatings but even they will rust in the climates where salt and road chemicals are used to melt snow and ice on the roads. I won’t miss the Winters when I move.

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    I recognize that air cleaner sticker. My father bought an F-250 pickup in 1968, and it was equipped with the 360 CI truck engine, which had that sticker. I always thought it was ironic that it had a checkered flag motif, as it was anything but a high performance engine.

  • avatar
    kcflyer

    Panther love alert. Craigslist buffalo has a by owner 2004 Town Car with under 5 thousand miles. Totally mint for around 23 K U.S. Landau roof. I so want…

  • avatar
    dal20402

    I just can’t with this era of Ford styling. Everything looks heavy, ungainly, and clumsy to me. I like both the late-’60s cars and the post-downsizing cars better.

  • avatar
    Pianoboy57

    Lou_RC

    My ’66 had the 352 four barrel and automatic. I was getting about 11.5 around town. Since it was only used to get to a nearby college I never road tripped in it. I do remember though that it was smooth and quiet up around 55 mph. I do believe it had what they used to call a highway rear end. I had the fastback body style. I moved up to a ’69 Mustang with the 250 and automatic thinking I’d get better mileage. Not much, my ’04 F150 does better the the Mustang ever did.

  • avatar
    sgeffe

    What was the reason why HVAC panels were on the left side of the steering column on late ‘60s-early ‘70s Ford and GM full-sizers? With Ford it was likely due to the “cockpit” dashboards, but why did GM go that way?

  • avatar
    tonycd

    The styling is basically a knockoff of that era’s Pontiac with the big schnozz and the arching rise over the rear wheel. All Ford styling knocked off GM in that era.

    My dad had one of these, and one of the same era LTD’s. The LTD had the ridiculously fast and smooth 429 engine, the top option even on the top model, which he’d paid extra for. I drove it as a teen and was spooked by how effortlessly fast it was and how utterly unequipped the car was to hand it with a nautical suspension, tiny bias-ply tires and alleged brakes. I also remember riding as a passenger with him as he gleefully smoked a Cadillac in an impromptu street race up to 90 mph. In retrospect, that’s a helluva lot scarier than it was at the time.

    You can go right down the line with these cars and their peers: materials quality, drivability, active safety, crash safety, maintenance demands, seating. They’re utterly humiliated by today’s cars in every imaginable metric except for trunk space and the shadow they cast. And, maybe, affordability.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @tonycd – I’d have to disagree. The Custom/XL/Galaxie/LTD design evolved over time where the headlights were stacked or side by side depending on the year. 60-64’s had a similar style that morphed into the 65-69 style. The 70’s onward took design cues from the earlier era. Just like now, we see design esthetics that are common to an era.

  • avatar
    Michael S6

    In 1978 my dad paid $400 for a used 1968(?) Galaxie 500 with the 400 so I can commute to community college.
    The car had loose steering and I was shocked by the Paltry power delivery from its engine. 10-12 mpg was expected.

  • avatar
    kosmo

    Great one. I was a half-decade ahead of Murilee growing in St. Paul, and one of my “gang” of closest friends had one of these. So big, and SO slow! I think 1972 was the low water mark for power, with new emissions requirements in place before auto makers figured out how to meet them and include power. Thanks for the memories!

  • avatar
    Pianoboy57

    Did anyone notice that the car the lady was sitting in had a tilt wheel and power windows? I would think with all that luxury gear that it would’ve had the center armrest too. My favorite thing to do as a teen was to ride my bike around in supermarket parking lots looking inside the big Fords of the time. Eventually I did realize my big Ford dreams with a ’94 Grand Marquis LS. It still amazes me that those cars were as big as my F150 is.

  • avatar
    jbltg

    Gotta love those interior and exterior color schemes! So boring and somber are today’s cars. Trade off I guess for superior performance and build quality…but…

  • avatar
    mdoore

    got a lump in my throat seeing this one. The parents of my grade school /high school sweetheart owned this exact model! I rode in it numerous times on grade school field trips and later drove it a number of times in high school. It was around for a year or 2 after we graduated in 84. My sweetheart, her parents and their car have since past away. We all know automobiles are just machines, but they definitely have a soul and trigger fond childhood memories. Hopefully its parts will find survivors. That grill assembly and trims look perfect.

  • avatar

    When I was a wee lad, A/C was a big fat hairy deal. I recall our family cars didn’t have it, but my grandparents had a Chrysler New Yorker with AC…sitting in August traffic, with windows up, was a status symbol.

  • avatar
    wjtinfwb

    That Magnum Force clip “Made My Day”! That Custom was a pretty stout car, didn’t notice any of the usual steel reinforcements hanging under the front suspension as is typical of these stunt cars. And that LTD Convertible that is Clint’s personal ride is a beauty. Almost lean and sporty looking; much cleaner than the big GM rigs of the same period.

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