By on March 9, 2022

 

After what seems like three eons and two epochs of concept vehicles, Volkswagen has finally taken the covers off a production-ready version of the ID. Buzz van. European models, of the type shown here, go on sale this calendar year with a long-wheelbase passenger model to debut for the North American market in 2023 and go on sale in 2024

And, yes, the word ‘bus’ does make it into the official press materials.

The new ID. Buzz is all-electric – because that’s the way life is these days. Initial versions will come to the European market with an 82 kWh lithium-ion battery (77 kWh net) powering an electric motor good for 201 horsepower and 229 lb-ft of torque. This configuration means the ID. Buzz is only available in rear-wheel drive for now, though you can bet your tie-dyed shirts there will be a dual-motor variant at some point in the future. VW remains mum on this vehicle’s total driving range.

It’ll not escape your notice there are passenger and cargo variants scattered amongst these photos, both of which share identical dimensions for the European market. Specifically, it will be 76.3 inches high and 185.5 inches long on a 117.6-inch wheelbase and 78.1-inch overall body width. To put that in perspective, the Kia Carnival (a machine with which the ID. Buzz does not directly compete but is nevertheless also a vaguely boxed-shaped van) has a roof about six inches closer to the ground but is nearly a foot-and-a-half longer in total length. Width is roughly the same.

 

This would be a good time to remind readers that VW took pains to mention there will be a long-wheelbase passenger model coming to North America in a couple of years. Left unsaid is if that machine will supplement the short(er) wheelbase Euro van – car nuts will get that subtle reference – or if it will stand on its own merits. We are wagering the latter since the market for this type of rig is surely not big enough in this country to warrant a brace of all-electric retro vans.

Speaking of, while the ID. Buzz short overhangs and available two-tone color palette pay homage to the past, its high-tech interior trappings (and EV powertrain) look squarely into the future. There are five seats in the passenger variant at launch – three in cargo trim – with the aforementioned extended wheelbase version packing a seven-seat 2/3/2 configuration. A 10-inch Digital Cockpit display is paired with a 10-inch infotainment system along with a smattering of digital buttons and touch sliders. The transmission in this Euro version is operated via a steering column stalk but it remains to be seen if that will cross the pond. Active lighting is used for typical ambient purposes but is also tied into the navigation system, with certain parts of the lights advising of road obstructions or corresponding with a navigation instruction to change lanes. Like the gearshift, we’ll see if that makes it stateside.

The ID. Buzz is built on the company’s scalable Modular Electric Drive platform, a unit on which roughly 30 percent of all electric vehicles in the Volkswagen Group are already based. Company spox say that number will nearly triple in the next five years.

[Images: VW]

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38 Comments on “Groovy, Man: VW Formally Introduces ID. Buzz...”


  • avatar
    kcflyer

    Can I buy one for the same price as a comparably equipped ICE vehicle of the same passenger capacity? Will it have the same range as that vehicle in all weather? Can I recharge it in the same time it takes to refuel a similar ICE vehicle? If the answer to all three is yes then I say bring it on.

    • 0 avatar
      Astigmatism

      No, but then, you can’t fill up a comparably equipped ICE vehicle of the same passenger capacity for $9 while it’s sitting in your garage, either.

      BTW, I salute you for having owned possibly the only reliable Ford Windstar in the history of the model.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      We should ask these sorts of questions about ICE vehicles. Can I find fuel for 3 cents/mile? Can I fill up at home without a trip to a dingy, crime-prone gas station? Can I sit in the car with the heat on while waiting to pick someone up without exposure to exhaust fumes? Can I maintain it as cheaply as a comparable EV?

      • 0 avatar
        orobertscab

        Perhaps we should also ask. How many tons of earth were mined and how many third world kids were employed to build that battery? also, how was the power generated to charge that battery?
        I’m not opposed to EV’s, but the idea they are less impactful to the earth than fossil fuels for the complete lifecycle of the vehicle is debatable.

        • 0 avatar
          Astigmatism

          You can of course ask that. Unfortunately, it turns out that, in addition to the direct emissions of ICE cars being higher than the direct emissions needed to generate the power to power EVs, the indirect life-cycle emissions of ICE cars is actually even greater than the indirect life-cycle emissions of EVs, too.

          https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-021-27247-y

          • 0 avatar
            orobertscab

            Then there is this.
            https://issues.org/environmental-economic-costs-minerals-solar-wind-batteries-mills/
            Lots of opinions and data to decipher, perhaps it depends on who is getting paid to provide the information? I’m for EV’s, I just think we are better off taking a slower approach to their implementation. 50% EV’s in the U.S. by 2030 sounds way too aggressive to me.

          • 0 avatar
            Astigmatism

            The funny thing is, that article – by a guy who literally makes his living by attacking clean energy, and has been doing so for years – fails to do exactly what the Nature article noted so many similar articles fail to do: while it talks (with every little data) about the high cost of extraction of renewables, it never so much as mentions the cost of extraction, transport, etc. of non-renewables. The point of the Nature article is that, if you look at extraction and other indirect costs of both renewables and non-renewables, clean energy actually comes out better, not worse.

          • 0 avatar
            orobertscab

            Okay, so my source is lying and has no credibility, and your source speaks the truth, and it’s not possible your source derives any financial gain from it’s findings. My apologies for suggesting perhaps EV’s and renewables are not as green as their marketing makes them out to be and a slower move to EV’s is prudent. The Biden team is looking for folks to pitch that ‘Green New Deal”, go for it!

      • 0 avatar
        jalop1991

        “Can I fill up at home without a trip to a dingy, crime-prone gas station?”

        dude, you lost everyone right there. You sound like the black and white portion of an infomercial. You have zero credibility after that.

        BTW, I can fill up an ICE without a trip to a dingy, crime-prone gas station. Strike that–I *do* fill up my ICE vehicles without a trip to a dingy, crime-prone gas station.

        If all you have ever gone to are dingy, crime-prone gas stations, you need more help than an EV can give you.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        “Can I find fuel for 3 cents/mile? Can I fill up at home without a trip to a dingy, crime-prone gas station? Can I sit in the car with the heat on while waiting to pick someone up without exposure to exhaust fumes? Can I maintain it as cheaply as a comparable EV?”

        I’m sure there exists people for whom the above is important enough to warrant being stranded in the Yukon on a cold winter’s day. Or running out juice on a the boatramp, before your boat is even out of the water. But I bet most people will put up with the occasional gas station visit (are there really people out there, with that serious a case of gas station phobia?), rather than take the stranded risk. ICE’s “issues,” by now, are at the most slight annoyances. Being stranded is an awful lot worse than that.

        • 0 avatar
          Astigmatism

          Yes, I imagine being able to fill up for next to nothing when compared to ICE cars is important to a lot of people. And I don’t know why you think being out of juice on a boat ramp is any more likely than being out of gas on a boat ramp. There aren’t gas stations on boat ramps, either – though at least at my marina, there are plenty of outlets.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          How many people are in the Yukon in the winter to get stranded? Not many. Most of us live prosaic lives in the suburbs. The whole phenomenon of giant lifted trucks is purely because admitting that fact threatens a lot of people’s manhood. Now we are seeing that admitting they could get along perfectly fine without a roof rack full of jerry cans is just as threatening.

          My EV has 238 miles’ stated range and has never been below 25% in the three years I’ve owned it. Even getting below 50% is the exception rather than the rule. Yes, we have another car that gets used for the long road trips, but the EV is used on at least 4x as many days as that other car.

    • 0 avatar

      Increased fear with age is related to the plasticity or flexibility of the prefrontal cortex of the brain.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        “Increased fear with age is related to the plasticity or flexibility of the prefrontal cortex of the brain.”

        Oh. I thought it was just a right wing old guy problem.

  • avatar
    MKizzy

    My take:

    A) The cost vs an ICE equivalent minivan will probably be similar given how today vehicles now average close to $45K out the door.

    B) It will undoubtedly have shorter range vs other minivans. How much that matters depends on how you plan on using the vehicle.

    C) EV charging speed will never match ICE but it only matters if you’re on a road trip. As EV fans like to tout, it only takes a seconds to plug in at home or work and they always start their next trip fully charged.

    The relationship between range and charging speeds while traveling is more complex. If highway range is sufficient to drive 3 to 4 hours at a time and there’s sufficient charging infrastructure to top off the battery at will, then today’s charging speeds are sufficient. However, if your range is shorter, then faster charging takes priority.

    Personally,I’ll be on board as soon as “affordable” EVs can provide 300 miles of highway range at reasonable speeds in typical winter temps and there’s enough infrastructure to support stopping to charge at my discretion.

    • 0 avatar
      la834

      The thing is, this is exactly the type of vehicle I’d want for a road trip, so the long refuel times are an issue. I trust there will be progress on this front, though.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      “The relationship between range and charging speeds while traveling is more complex. If highway range is sufficient to drive 3 to 4 hours at a time and there’s sufficient charging infrastructure to top off the battery at will, then today’s charging speeds are sufficient. However, if your range is shorter, then faster charging takes priority.”

      Don’t people, on a car enthusiast site at least, make at least some sort of effort to route plan away from the most boring freeway route? Which, at least for the foreseeable future, at least out West, means away from even the hope of finding charging stations.

  • avatar
    kcflyer

    In 2000 I purchased a Ford Windstar. The cost was about 27,000 us. Adjusted for inflation that’s about 44 thousand in todays money. In 2000 that Windstar got between 27 and 30 mpg on the highway and about 22 mpg in mixed Pittsburgh driving (lots of hills). It could tow 3000 lbs and in fact I once towed my boat from PA to Oklahoma and still averaged 28 mpg (17 foot fiberglass boat w trailer weighed 2800 lbs) It seated 7 (6 adults comfortably with plenty of baggage space. It was reliable. After 160,000 miles the only major repair was the heater core which was replaced under warrantee. It was still running good when we sold it. It had a range of nearly 400 miles on the highway and could be refueled in under 5 minutes. If this van can do all that for $44 k sign me up. If not then 22 years has not produced much progress.

    • 0 avatar
      Master Baiter

      “If not then 22 years has not produced much progress.”

      But your Windstar was destroying the planet. If you buy this VW, you will save it. Plus, ambient lighting.

  • avatar
    Tim Healey

    We know the formatting may be messed up for some of you, we’re fixing it.

  • avatar
    Astigmatism

    I really don’t get why they raked the front fascia as aggressively as they did. Okay, maybe I do: presumably there’s some aerodynamic benefit. But the concept vehicle – the one people fell in love with back in (checks watch) the Obama administration, I think?, had a friendly face that delighted. This one has a scowl.

  • avatar
    gregtwelve

    I wonder if a bunch of these along with other VW EVs will be loaded onto freighters bound for Rhode Island. Or will they or their insurance carrier have second thoughts?

  • avatar
    SilverCoupe

    Will it have a power limiting device, to slow it down so it will be more like the original? It’s just not a VW bus if it’s not holding up a line of traffic!

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    VW? I need to know more about the headliner.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I actually like this VW bus but I have no interest or need for a van.

    • 0 avatar
      la834

      Lots of people who don’t need SUVs bought them anyway. Since the ’70s happened, we know the same is true for vans.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        True many people buy vehicles they don’t need. That is why advertising and marketing is so successful at convincing people to buy things they don’t need. I do like the retro vibe of the ID. Buzz.

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