By on January 5, 2022

General Motors CEO Mary Barra made a slew of product announcements during CES 2022, with the biggest being an update on the Silverado EV. However, Chevrolet will need to fill out its ranks if it’s to become a totally electrified brand as planned, resulting in the confirmation of electric variants of the Equinox and Blazer.

With modestly sized crossovers and SUVs still gaining ground in North America, Barra believes it makes good sense to electrify a couple in the assumption that the segment will have a larger pool of customers to draw from. But there’s precious little detail about either model, minus GM’s promise to launch both models by 2023 and sell the Equinox EV for around $30,000. 

On the surface, this is huge. Electric vehicles typically cost more than a similarly equipped and sized internal combustion vehicle, so anybody selling one for under $35,000 is already making news. But GM isn’t sharing hardly anything about either vehicle. We don’t even know if these upcoming crossovers will be wholly dependent on batteries or end up as plug-in hybrids.

Barra seemed to be confirming that they’d be shunning gasoline entirely and the relevant marketing materials don’t seem to indicate hybridization. Though that also poses a few problems. Chevrolet already sells an electrified sport utility compact with the Bolt EUV for around $33,500. Meanwhile, your standard Equinox retails for just below $26,000 (though you’d be hard-pressed to find one for that price right now) and is actually a little larger.

Selling an electrified variant less for roughly $30,000 would entail a massive price reduction for Bolt models or a highly specific, weak-assed powertrain being installed into the prospective Equinox EV. We could see GM making an eco-focused hybrid literally fitting the bill, as there are plenty of other vehicles with hybrid versions that don’t stray too far from the base price.

Another option is allowing the model to use older hardware, while other products run with the new Ultium platform, and discounting older BEVs until the electric Equinox’s $30k point of entry makes more sense. This one seems plausible, as the automaker has already suggested that Bolt models won’t be getting the new battery hardware that’s going into the Cadillac Lyric. They’ll be sticking with BEV2 for the foreseeable future and the manufacturer has already lowered prices. That could continue through 2023, giving the Chevys some financial distance from each other — assuming the older models stick around that long.

But let’s not forget that manufacturers have gotten in the extremely bad habit of announcing electric vehicle pricing with the associated tax credits. Mary Barra could simply be claiming the Equinox EV will have a $30,000 price tag after customers account for the relevant tax credits. Though that would be kind of dishonest, especially considering GM has already exhausted its quota (along with Tesla) and the revised plan under the Biden administration’s Build Back Better agenda is anything but settled upon.

Chevrolet could find itself in a position to have the federal government lopping $12,500 off the price if BBB passes. However, it’s currently not moving through Congress after numerous automakers (including Tesla) bemoaned its reliance on unionized labor to determine valuations and Senators argued the bill was loaded up with costly government projects and sweeping changes to the nation’s tax structure. If a revised version of the Build Back Better fails to pass (which seems possible), then GM might end up selling the Equinox EV north of $40,000.

Considering the Ford “Mustang” Mach-E starts around $44,000, a $30,000 Equinox EV using the Ultium platform seems pretty much impossible without some kind of massive incentivizing. Otherwise, GM has to either be prepping the crossover to be an ultra-low-range BEV with a teensy-tiny battery or an otherwise normal plug-in hybrid (which seems unlikely). We’re inclined to think that corporate leadership has simply opted to take into account renewed government discounts that don’t yet exist. It’s presumptuous, misleading, and potentially illegal if the Securities and Exchange Commission feels GM is misleading investors. But it has also become standard practice among plenty of automakers, especially those that plan on rolling out grimy subscription services for baked-in hardware, delivering software-focused “ownership experiences,” and leveraging customer data to enhance profitability at every opportunity — which General Motors absolutely is.

Could the upcoming Chevy Equinox EV start at $30,000 sans credits? Totally. But that doesn’t mean it will.

[Images: General Motors]

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43 Comments on “Chevrolet Announces $30,000 Electric Equinox at CES 2022...”


  • avatar
    3800FAN

    Its GM and these are not full sized trucks and suvs with high profit margins. Dont hold your breath. Its like GMs fwd vehicles in the 80s and 90s, always a day late and a dollar short.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    EV prices are going to have to come down, and the result of this is that the Bolt EV and Bolt EUV will get cheaper. The 2022 Bolts are already several thousand dollars cheaper than their predecessors and it’s good to see GM being honest with itself about the fact that the trend needs to continue. The regulatory environment is not going to allow automakers to just plow the savings from cheaper batteries into margin.

    A $30K mainstream-sized EV CUV and a $50K electric pickup together will change the EV landscape, a lot.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      I expect the Bolt family won’t exist after 2025. It’ll just be replaced by a (better) EV Trailblazer.

    • 0 avatar

      Exactly ! Current EV are either 70-130k price point or an economy car with an upper-middle price tag, so literally zero as far as the “how much car can I get for X a month”…..market which is 96% of the buyers out there.

    • 0 avatar
      3800FAN

      Theyll only come down if the $/kwh of batteries come down. The battery is everything and Im not betting on it coming from gm, especially given their track record with the bolt that catches on fire.
      And if you say im a gm hater its cuz my entire life every product theyve put out is inferior and flawed compared to the competition and they went bankrupt. Dont put stock in gm.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        “Theyll only come down if the $/kwh of batteries come down. The battery is everything and Im not betting on it coming from gm”

        I agree, and it probably won’t be from GM. Hopefully, Barra walks down to the Bluetti Power booth at CES and asks why their battery packs have “Na+” printed on the side in big letters and what it stands for. The handwriting is on the “(power)wall.”

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        The price of batteries is already lower than what is priced into current GM EV prices, but it is going to have to go down a bit further to make a $30k EV Equinox with at least the Bolt’s range a profitable proposition. It will, but not necessarily by 2023.

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        GM is in a joint venture with LGChem who made the batteries with the problems. The Michigan made batteries were never recalled initially but were under the final recall which is not battery replacment but monitoring system.

        So stop foaming at the mouth DW!

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      The Bolt was down to $18-19K right before the redesign. Plenty jumped in on these!

  • avatar
    pmirp1

    Mary Berra was on CNBC, and said there will be electric Equinox and Blazer. It will be interesting to see what the Blazer will be.

    Overall, she definitely is not a car person. Most of her answers were generic.

  • avatar
    make_light

    Both this and the Chrysler just look like rehashes of the EV6.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    “Mary Barra could simply be claiming the Equinox EV will have a $30,000 price tag after customers account for the relevant tax credits.”

    Reasonable question to ask, and it seems Chevy already answered it. Here’s the company’s official press release, which I uncovered using a secret journalist’s tool called “google”:
    https://media.chevrolet.com/media/us/en/chevrolet/home.detail.html/content/Pages/news/us/en/2022/jan/ces/0105-2024-equinox.html

    The company’s listing the price as MSRP, and there’s no mention of tax credits, but if one wanted to be sure, the release also lists two contact people at Chevrolet, each of whom has a direct mobile phone number listed. No slogging through the company switchboard required.

    Now, maybe I’m old school, but if I had a question like the one Matt brings up, I wouldn’t do a writeup that throws shade on the advertised price – I’d call the two contacts listed and get clarification before I published the article.

    Perhaps stuff like that doesn’t happen in the blog age.

  • avatar
    ttiguy

    @ FreedMike

    Posky is a grade-A lazy / incompetent hack. Simple as that.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Point on the doll to where the bad man touched you.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        I’d say it’s the “guy who presents himself as a journalist but doesn’t do the stuff journalists normally do, like checking out facts” place, but I don’t want to speak for ttiguy.

        • 0 avatar
          ttiguy

          @ FreedMike

          Exactly. Posky is simply making stuff up here based on conjecture. he does this routinely on TTAC without consequence.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            There are some well thought out valid criticisms in the other Posky thread, do you have any?

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @28:

            Id say “failing basic journalism 101” stuff like making arguments without checking facts IS a valid point.

            I agree with you – Posky makes interesting points from time to time. But when you have a writer who makes his readers slog through blatant inaccuracies and lazy journalism (in this case, he questioned whether the price of this car includes a tax credit without bothering to verify), the conversation becomes about the writer’s own inadequacies as a writer, not the points he’s trying to make. Valid points made through bulls**t are bulls**t.

            I just want the guy to up his Journalism 101 game.

          • 0 avatar
            Matt Posky

            I do speculate a lot and the reason I get away with it is because I try to make that abundantly clear, my articles tend to do pretty well, and automakers rarely give out useful information early.

            GM has said that “around $30K” was the target price but that it would also be “subject to change” as we approach fall of 2023. That’s a non answer and I don’t make enough money at TTAC to always spend my whole day hunting the down one person at GM who will give me a firm, quotable response hours later. If they do, we post an update. But PR contacts exist to spin stories into something positive for the brand, pump up investors, and occasionally bother my editor when I write something they don’t like — not to dole out concrete answers that probably don’t exist anyway. I used to work in PR full time and I defy anyone to get GM to commit to a firm $30K for this car today.

            Most writers, regardless of status, are hacks and maybe I am too. But I would still argue that’s less sad than spending every single day logging into a website to gripe about things of little personal consequence for free. While I do try to respond to criticisms, we have a few angry readers that are seemingly impossible to please or just have an axe to grind with me. Probably because I write snide responses like this one.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            “…I don’t make enough money at TTAC to always spend my whole day hunting the down one person at GM who will give me a firm, quotable response hours later…”

            So…even though someone who bills himself as a journalist is sometimes expected to chase down facts, you’re not going to do that because you’re not paid enough.

            I think that attitude speaks for itself.

    • 0 avatar
      ttiguy

      @ 28 cars – I’m not really interested in being his editor

      pretty sure I could make more $$ at McDonalds :)

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Generally speaking creative types need feedback in order to grow. If a misspelling or poor grammar were at fault it may be more obvious to the writer but calling them a “hack” with no feedback as to why does not help them become better.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    It’s a bit of a stretch to assume that a drop in EV prices has to be from government largesse rather than a continuation of the decade-long trend of decreasing battery cost.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Well, stretchin’ without researchin’ is what this writer tends to do. At least he didn’t promote an undersecretary in the UK cabinet to “Minister of Transport.” Progress!

      If I was wondering how GM is planning on selling this car so cheap – a valid question, by the way – I’d be asking GM, versus spitballing reasons.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Back on topic…that’s not a bad looking vehicle at all. And I’m glad to see they appear to have good old fashioned buttons for climate and steering wheel controls.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Well, my 124-mile Ioniq EV’s MSRP was $30k in late 2018; it’s a Base model.

    Once the Bolt comes off stop-sale, you can get one for well under $30k, and they have decent range.

    So a $30k Equinox seems plausible to me, although I’m thinking the Bolt gets euthanized the minute the Equinox appears.

  • avatar
    aks2423

    Definitely a rememberable car. I really liked the INDIEV booth and their setup with their car. They talked about blockchain being available in their car?? Seems like the new EV’s are going to give the old guys a run for their money! Haha

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Consumer Electronics Show – isn’t that where they introduce appliances?

  • avatar
    Socrates77

    Drawing is not reality, by the time GM begins making electric cars the competition will be 5 years ahead. What a joke

  • avatar
    FAHRVERGNUGEN

    Wonder if GM will rename the Blazer if / when one catches fire while recharging.

    But I guess if they didn’t rename the Fiero, then maybe nothing will ever change.

  • avatar
    carguy

    It’s a fine looking electric hatchback. Given the price don’t expect range numbers much above 200 miles.

  • avatar
    randy in rocklin

    When it’s time to replace the old battery, the new one will cost more than the car is worth. Then imagine all the used batteries piling up somewhere unless they figure out a way to recycle them at low cost.

  • avatar
    Michael S6

    The real price is $41,000 and GM is counting on Bidan to pass the $11,000 hand out to the company and union.

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