By on September 27, 2021

2021 Dodge Durango 392. Tim Healey/TTAC

2021 Dodge Durango SRT 392 AWD Fast Facts

6.4-liter V8 (475 horsepower @ 6,000 rpm; 470 lb-ft @ 4,300 rpm)

Eight-speed automatic transmission, all-wheel drive

13 city / 19 highway / 15 combined (EPA Rating, MPG)

18.3 city, 12.2 highway, 15.6 combined. (NRCan Rating, L/100km)

Base Price: $62,995 (U.S) / $81,260 (Canada)

As Tested: $72,660 (U.S.) / $89,258 (Canada)

Prices include $1,495 destination charge in the United States and $1,895 to $2,795 for freight, PDI, and A/C tax in Canada and, because of cross-border equipment differences, can’t be directly compared.

If you want a large SUV and want performance, Dodge is happy to oblige. I mean, the brand even built a Hellcat Durango, fer chrissake.

Of course, not everyone wants the insanity that is a Hellcat, yet some buyers still want performance that goes above and beyond the norm.

Enter the 2021 Dodge Durango SRT 392.

Offering up 475 horsepower and 470 lb-ft of torque from its 6.4-liter Hemi V8, the Durango has guts enough. And an old-school V8 rumble which can turn into a roar under enough throttle.

You’ll never want for passing power, although you will cringe when you think about how much fuel is being sucked down. Best not to think of it.

Indeed, there’s enough power on tap here that the Hellcat seems superfluous, a machine only for the truly insane, as well as those who simply must have the most expensive and/or desirable toy.

2021 Dodge Durango 392. Tim Healey/TTAC

Let the Mopar-addled convince themselves they need, if not want, the Hellcat. The SRT will provide the passing punch that brings grins, and at a lower price.

It will also give you handling  that while still far from the realm of a true sporting machine, is at least admirable for a vehicle of this size. It’s no corner carver, and body roll will be a mild issue, but the Durang SRT is still enjoyable to drive in situations other than a straight line, thanks to well-weighted steering that mostly avoids feeling too numb and the SRT-tuned short- and long-arm independent front suspension with aluminum lower control arms, coil springs, Bilstein adaptive damping shocks, and hollow stabilizer bar.

The rear suspension setup is SRT-tuned multi-link with Bilstein adaptive damping, coil springs, aluminum lower control arm, and stabilizer bar.

Ride isn’t sacrificed – while the SRT seems a bit stiffer than its less-powerful brethren, it’s still quite comfortable when driven gently.

2021 Dodge Durango 392. Tim Healey/TTAC

Which, let’s face it, is probably how most drivers will use their Durangos. The big honkin’ V8 is nice, but this a family hauler, not a race car. So that power will likely be most often tapped for passing and towing, not blazing the straightaway at one’s local run what ya brung night.

Speaking of towing, you need to opt for the towing package, and if you do, maximum capacity with the 6.4 is 8,700 pounds.

2021 Dodge Durango 392. Tim Healey/TTAC

Power doesn’t come cheap, and the base price for this all-wheel-drive test unit was over $62K. That price of entry includes Brembo brakes with SRT pads and red-painted calipers, the adaptive suspension, an electronic limited-slip differential for the rear axle, performance exhaust, sport-tuned steering, configurable drive modes, power liftgate, keyless entry and starting, Uconnect infotainment, navigation, Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, SRT Performance Pages, satellite radio, wireless cell-phone charger, in-car Wi-Fi, heated front seats, cooled front seats, heated second-row seats, LED fog lamps, LED headlights, 20-inch wheels, and Pirelli all-season tires.

The optional Technology Group ($2,395) added advance brake assist, lane-departure warning plus, full-speed collision-warning plus, and adaptive cruise control with stop. $1,195 is what it took to add the Trailer-Tow Group IV, which included a compact spare tire and 20-inch wheel, trailer-brake controller, and Class IV receiver hitch. For $2,495, one can add the Premium Interior Group, which includes a suede headliner, upgraded instrument panel, and forged carbon-fiber interior accents. Harmon Kardon audio runs another $995 and three-season Pirelli tires replace the standard all-seasons for $595. Finally, blind-spot detection and rear cross-path detection add $495.

2021 Dodge Durango 392. Tim Healey/TTAC

With the $1,495 destination charge, the total as-tested price was $72,660.

The cabin is familiar by now, following the usual Dodge formula of large knobs/easy-to-use buttons. Uconnect remains one of the best infotainment systems out there, and the Performance Pages are fun to play with. The interior design isn’t sexy, but it is functional, and that almost certainly matters more to buyers in this class.

If you don’t need a high-performance large SUV – and few do – you can save some coin by going downmarket with your Durango. You can still even get a V8. But should you have the horsepower bug, this version of the Durango is more livable and less expensive than the Hellcat.

2021 Dodge Durango 392. Tim Healey/TTAC

It’s not necessarily the Goldilocks of all Durangos – this particular V8 version is still a bit bonkers. It’s still a bit too performance-focused for the masses. But if you want a Durango and eight cylinders, the 392 might be just right.

It offers more power and performance than the 5.7 without treading into the crazy zone that the Hellcat occupies. It’s pricey, sure, but not as eye-popping as the Hellcat.

Yes, I know, the Goldilocks comp is a bit overused. But I can’t help it – when it comes to this Durango, it just fits.

[Images © 2021 Tim Healey/TTAC]

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75 Comments on “2021 Dodge Durango SRT 392 AWD Review – The Goldilocks V8 Durango...”


  • avatar
    EBFlex

    It’s nice to see a manufacturer build what people want.

    Although soon these real vehicles will be replaced by novelty electric compliance vehicles that suck at just about everything do.

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      Yeah, that Taycan really sucks at about everything it tries to do. What a POS.

      • 0 avatar
        GogglesPisano

        Taycan?? This is a Durango buddy.

        • 0 avatar
          Dave M.

          I think he was just poking EB’s usual abhorrence to anything more modern than crank starters.

          Overall, this chassis has been a cash cow for Mopar for quite some time, which good to see for them. Once the chassis ultimately dates itself out due to most likely safety constraints, it’ll be interesting to see how/if they replace it.

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        “ Yeah, that Taycan really sucks at about everything it tries to do. What a POS.”

        I mean….when a used Mitsubishi Mirage can beat it in a long distance race by many hours you have to wonder how anyone can be attracted to EVs. They are such an inferior form of transportation compared to an ICE vehicle it’s astounding.

        And that’s before you take into account how damaging they are to the planet, the fact they are extremely overpriced, and overall offer little desirability.

  • avatar
    jack4x

    I’m glad Dodge still sees fit to offer vehicles like this, but once you’re above $70K it’s going to be a GM full sizer for me every time.

    • 0 avatar
      DC Bruce

      $70K gets you the base engine and the “LT” trim in a Tahoe, which, unless you need/want the extra size is otherwise inferior in performance to this. Having lived 6 years with a GMC half ton pickup, I can’t imagine a daily driver in suburbia of this length and width. It can be done, of course, but it’s not fun. I spend most of my time in a small town in the country.

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        This is $72K as tested. A 4×4 High Country Suburban is $76K. I’d find the extra money to upgrade.

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          I agree. The ‘Burb pretty much does it all. Not a rocket, but I rented a Premier trim model on a ski trip and it was excellent. First vehicle I’ve driven with all those safety nannies – the emergency braking engaged just as my foot hit the brake pedal – at first I didn’t know what the hell was happening…but a well done design.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      I feel like the SRT Durango and high trim Suburban plays to different groups (like a Giulia Quadrifoglio vs an A7).

      The bigger kick to me is that going from a similarly-equipped R/T AWD to the SRT is around a $16K bump. On a Charger is about $4500 to go from a base R/T to a base Scat Pack and about $10K to go from a base R/T to a Scat Pack Widebody. I know for some people $16K is “whatever” money, but I’d really have to weigh if the 392 performance bump is worth it in this vehicle class.

      Although the cheapest 5.7L Grand Cherokee L is $62K.

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        “I feel like the SRT Durango and high trim Suburban plays to different groups”

        I agree, merely pointing out I’m solidly in the latter.

        “The bigger kick to me is that going from a similarly-equipped R/T AWD to the SRT is around a $16K bump.”

        That’s egregious and part of why I don’t understand who this vehicle is for.

        • 0 avatar
          stuki

          The suspensions are completely different. Sound as well. The Durango is a genuinely cool car, if you’re into the big, roaring engine kind of thing. The R/T is really competent, but lacks the grin factor.

          Towing 5K, the Durango allows you to gun it and roar around from every light. While still remaining well within license keeping territory. It’s utterly addicting. It may make no sense at all from a practical POV, as far as powertrain goes. But that’s the charm: The packaging is practical enough for daily use, despite the visceralness of it being in pre-turbo-AMG, or even Lambo, territory. And while it’s not cheap, it’s not really that expensive either.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            If people want an “SRT-style” 392 vehicle and they need to occasionally tow and they need a third row and they have a high $60k / low $70K budget and they don’t want to split duties among more than one vehicle then this Durango does thread that needle.

        • 0 avatar

          Different groups if you need the room Suburban hands down, but these drive way better then the GM fullsizers.

  • avatar
    4onthefloor

    Tim,
    I may disagree with you politically, but your most recent reviews and automotive observations are spot on, and very well written. Keep up the good work!

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    That would be a fun family hauler, if you don’t mind spending $300/month on gas.

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      SCE: And $1000/month on a car payment. Tack on your comprehensive insurance and you’re talking Mortgage Payment for a car.
      Then, once you estimate your depreciation losses, you’ll need to have a stiff drink.
      Jeez, this thing costs almost as much as having a wife.

      • 0 avatar
        CoastieLenn

        My $200,000 house was just under $1,000 per month PI&E with no money down… I wouldn’t want to spend that on a car even if I could.

        • 0 avatar
          cleanOnTheInside

          Agree – but as a used car, assuming it can be had for around 30-40% less in 3 years when leases are returned, it could be a fun second car option.

          (Although, that estimate is pre-pandemic – so I’ll probably end up picking up cars too old for Carmax/Carvana to sell, like a 2011 M5 I saw for $16k with 70k miles I saw on CL.)

  • avatar
    DC Bruce

    Lose the 70s era racing stripe and some color other than US Army green, and I’ll think about it. If memory serves, the 6.4, at least in 3/4 ton pickup duty, has cylinder deactivation. In my GMC pickup with a similarly equipped engine, that provides meaningful mileage gains in highway use. I understand earlier GM engines with this feature, as well as Honda V-6s that have it, have reliability problems. At 122K miles, I haven’t seen any.
    BTW, does this have the independent rear suspension now fitted to the Grand Cherokee L? “Multi link” can be used to describe either a solid axle or an IRS.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      “meaningful mileage gains in highway use”

      For this Durango, that means 19 mpg highway.

    • 0 avatar
      Flipper35

      The Octane Red is the same as the Delmonico Red on the Ram trucks.

      Billet Clearcoat [Silver]
      DB Black Clearcoat [Black]
      Destroyer Gray Clearcoat [Gray]
      Granite Clearcoat [Gray]
      In-Violet Clearcoat [Red]
      Octane Red Pearlcoat [Red]
      Reactor Blue Pearlcoat [Blue]
      Vice White [Off-white]
      White Knuckle Clearcoat [White]

      I think there is a blue also, but that may be 2022 models.

  • avatar
    make_light

    I still love this Durango, even if it’s a bit long in the tooth at this point. A coworker of mine (mid-40s mom) test drove just about every 3 row crossover a few years back. She said the Durango was the only one that “drove like a luxury car,” but Dodge’s quality reputation made her nervous and she ended up with a Highlander. Just about every competitor has been redesigned since then, but I bet the Dodge still feels quieter and more solid than most of them.

  • avatar
    Imagefont

    I had a Journey rental and plugged my cell phone into the USB to charge it. The stereo started playing music on my phone without asking (I hate that “feature”), and the touchscreen was displaying art for one song, displayed the title of a different song, but was actually playing yet a different song. I tried to directly select a song of my phone display, and it would play the song I selected, but continued to display art and titles that were different from each other and not the song actually playing, although the incorrect art and song titles were from songs actually on my phone. I just couldn’t believe how truly awful and backward the tech is in car infotainment system, and this after reading about how Dodges system is supposed to be so good. It’s not, it’s garbage, just like the rest of the car.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Yes, your undocumented experience on a rental vehicle is all that matters and everyone else is wrong.

      • 0 avatar
        conundrum

        @ajla:

        Well said! Of course, the possibility exists that the floor sweepings and dumpster reject parts are retrieved to fit to Journeys made for rental car companies.

      • 0 avatar
        Imagefont

        I was merely pointing out that Dodge, errr Stellantis, makes junk. These antiquated, over powered, over priced, ridiculous vehicles are simply a waste. Along with their incompetently designed and engineered infotainment systems, which is a design philosophy that likely carries through to every other part of these unreliable junk piles on wheels, destined for the crusher in the next decade. That’s all.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          Ok. Hope you feel better after that rant.
          UConnect is still a decent system though.

        • 0 avatar
          jkross22

          Imagefont, you lost all credibility when you called a vehicle overpowered.

          A waste? Maybe to you, but not others.

          I think this is badass. It’s not for me because I’m too cheap and it kills me to fork over even more fuel tax money to a state that wastes every nickel it can on corruption, but damn, this thing has the appeal of Christie Brinkley circa 1983.

        • 0 avatar
          Flipper35

          Well, the Journey is on the junk side, but the Uconnect is a good system.

          We have not had a single issue with the infotainment screen in 31k miles in our Pacifica.

  • avatar
    pmirp1

    Great vehicles that are even better with the Pentastar V6 or for those that are wanting for more power the regular HEMI V8.

    The SRT at close to 70k is competing with GM triplets. Those play in a different league and are better tow vehicles than unibody SUV that is Durango and the GM triplets have more presence.

    Buy the GM Tahoe or Yukon before wasting money on a Durango SRT.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @pmirp1 – I agree and it appears that most of the public I see agrees as well.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      I’m not sure how it will go over at the country club, but the SRT Durango is considerably quicker than the GM SUVs, even with the 6.2L. From 0-100 this is closer to a Camaro SS than a Yukon Denali.

      • 0 avatar
        pmirp1

        ajila, lets be serious, if your intentions are to go fast SUV is not the way to go.

        I have a 2016 Stingray in garage, Admiral Blue, and a Mustang GT 2014 Coyote manual with Ford racing 4.10(added). On Sundays I take them both or either out for a enjoyable drive.

        When I drive our SUVs and trucks, we go slow and love the quiet and peace on long highway rides. A fast SUV is ok, but I like my SUVs with insulation from noise, nice plush stable ride and size. It is what I value at least at this stage of life. In country club we look at go fast CUvs as not serious mature vehicles.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          It’s fair to think an SRT Durango is an unnecessary concept. However, I’m not sure a 392 intender would be satisfied with a Yukon’s acceleration.

          “we look at go fast CUvs as not serious mature vehicles.”

          Isn’t that somewhat the point of the SRT vehicles?

        • 0 avatar
          MrIcky

          pmirp1- “In country club we look at go fast CUVs as not serious mature vehicles”. I hate to break this to you, but most people look at your 2016 Stingray and 2014 Mustang as not serious mature vehicles either. Many look at your Stingray as maybe TOO mature and still not serious enough.

          That’s not me, but I’m realistic to know that EVERY go fast V8 basically has a degree of immaturity to it (not preaching- just stating a fact).

          Ergo, I’ll look at that Durango as an example of well executed for people who want that sort of car. I could easily see someone with kids who really wanted a sports car but couldn’t justify an ‘extra’ car picking up one of these to scratch the itch.

          And to be honest, in the real world for an adult that probably is effectively just as quick as a corvette. AWD on imperfect streets, a little more visibility due to height, the race stops at 10mph over- ya I’d bet on the durango

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “but couldn’t justify an ‘extra’ car picking up one of these to scratch the itch.”

            This is a high $60k / low $70K vehicle though. I guess some people might be limited to one parking space because they live in a condo or urban area but I think most folks at that budget level can pop for a used Camaro SS and a new Pacifica if that’s what they really want.

            I expect the majority of buyers here want the fast CUV and it’s not an alternative to anything smaller.

          • 0 avatar
            MrIcky

            Ajla, just an anecdote- I just put this scenario to my wife, need 3 rows of seats, etc. = or < $50k pacifica + 20k camaro ss or $70k durango. Her reply was 'you just need 1 car, that's ridiculous. Why would you buy 2 cars'.

          • 0 avatar
            pmirp1

            MrIcky, ” I hate to break this to you, but most people look at your 2016 Stingray and 2014 Mustang as not serious mature vehicles either. Many look at your Stingray as maybe TOO mature and still not serious enough. ”

            For many that may be the case, if Stingray or Mustang is their only vehicle and they have family to transport. That is not mature. In my case, those are my toys. I have a SUV and a trunk as our daily. At this stage of my life I enjoy toys, whether owning beach home, having an extra home that sibling lives in and I don’t want to sell, or having fine antiques and Persian rugs.

            I own a Grand Cherokee. I am familiar (very familiar) with their dealers. I enjoy visiting dealer and walking the lots. In my years of ownership of Grand Cherokee, I have seen very few SRT and TrackHawks Grand Cherokee and Durangos. Instead over 90% come with Pentastar, and most of remaining is regular V8.

            As for you thinking Durango is a better speed demon,that is your opinion. But clearly not shared by majority that buy Mustangs and Vette if they want to go fast.

          • 0 avatar

            Why buy 2 when 1 can do is pretty common the less a crazy car person you are. Some times it;s about what fits in the driveway, but other times it’s more about I want a car that’s practical but also fun. That’s what drive the entire sports sedan market for years. The same will be true with these. In the last year I have been shocked at the number of Explorer ST’s and Hemi and higher Durango’s I have seen. I would have figured they would be very rare but I see them all the time.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            What’s her reasoning for why it’s ridiculous? Does you wife want a sports car in the first place? Does she think a $70K 392 Durango is also ridiculous?

            If you *really wanted* a sports car or muscle car and you have a $70K budget then why would you “settle” *and* blow your entire budget on a single CUV?

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “Does she think a $70K 392 Durango is also ridiculous?”

            I think its ridiculous in a good way.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “Why buy 2 when 1 can do is pretty common the less a crazy car person you are.”

            But why is a “less car crazy” person shopping a $70K SRT Durango?

            I certainly hope that the people buying these are getting them because it is what they actually want and not as some sort of sports car substitute. I couldn’t imagine spending this much on a compromise.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “most people look at your 2016 Stingray and 2014 Mustang as not serious mature vehicles either. Many look at your Stingray as maybe TOO mature and still not serious enough.”

            No they really don’t, YOU might but “people” certainly do not. As recently as May the C8 was running on six day’s supply due to strong demand, but darn if only it were “serious”.

            https://gmauthority.com/blog/2021/06/2021-corvette-ran-on-extremely-low-six-day-supply-in-may/

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            Honestly most normies think way, way, way, way less about other people’s vehicles than car website commenters seem to believe.

          • 0 avatar

            Like I said it’s the same for the sports sedans. Why buy a Charger when you can get a challenger? There is a perceived amount of excess that occurs with owning multiple vehicles even when you can easily afford it.
            This is also true of people who don;t like the idea of something sitting around. I remember asking a panamera owner why she bought it. She said she had a 911 but after she had kids she still wanted a fast car but thought it was stupid to have a car sit in the garage 80% of it’s life. It’s just easier to justify mentally.
            People are strange and not always logical. They also love the idea of combining concepts into one package.
            My favorite one of these was a customer I had who made a deal with his wife to sell his 80’s fire bird and nearly 10 year old extended cab pickup and buy something with 4 doors and newer to avoid repair. And he went and got a 2 year old manual trans CTS-V.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “Why buy a Charger when you can get a Challenger?”

            Because the Challenger has super retro styling.

            The argument you’re making is that most people buying a Charger or 540i *really* wanted to buy Challenger or Z4 instead but I don’t think that’s the case.

            If you want a Tesla, buy a Tesla.
            If you want a Camaro, buy a Camaro.
            If you want a Durango SRT, buy a Durango SRT. None of them are going to be good substitutes for each other.

          • 0 avatar
            MrIcky

            “What’s her reasoning for why it’s ridiculous? Does you wife want a sports car in the first place? Does she think a $70K 392 Durango is also ridiculous?”

            -I just don’t think she likes the idea of a weekend car. Didn’t seem to be a cost thing.

            “most people look at your 2016 Stingray and 2014 Mustang as not serious mature vehicles either. Many look at your Stingray as maybe TOO mature and still not serious enough.”

            No they really don’t, YOU might but “people” certainly do not. As recently as May the C8 was running on six day’s supply due to strong demand, but darn if only it were “serious”.

            –no, most people certainly do. 1st off, I drive a challenger. I know it’s ridiculous on an intellectual level. I love it. And I’m good with people loving their Corvettes or whatever.

            MOST people from every poll, essay, story about young people not buying cars, etc. I’ve read in the last decade are not car people. They aren’t impressed and it’s pretty hard to argue that Corvette’s dont get a lot of guff for being ‘old dude cars’. So by people- I guess I mean ‘normies’ as someone else said- which would be the majority of the population.

            The C8 being in short supply isn’t really a good argument right now. Everything is in short supply. And it’s a low volume car to boot. I think Bronco Sports are practically on an order only basis with a 6 month wait and that’s mass volume.

            But whatever, kind of misconstrued what I said. What I’m saying is calling the Durango a not serious mature vehicle while driving a Corvette is the proverbial rock thrown from a glass house.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          “In country club we look at go fast CUvs as not serious mature vehicles.”

          In life go fast CUVs as not serious vehicles.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    I love that green colour. I don’t see many Durango’s let alone 6.2 or HellCat variants. I see mostly Cherokee’s and Grand Cherokee’s. I’ve never been able to rationalize how this fits in their overall SUV lineup.

  • avatar
    islander800

    Good Lord, look at the “design” of this thing compared to the Kia in the preceding article. Hey Dodge, 1983 called and wants its Dodge back. On second thoughts, 1983 is smarter than that….

  • avatar
    CoastieLenn

    My wife and I really wanted a Durango Citadel in 2017. We test drove a few and ultimately decided to go for an Explorer. I wasn’t sure we made the right choice at the time, but looking at it now, almost every Durango I see (we all know the vast majority sold are the 3.6L) has a ticking Pentastar and segments of the LED tail light bar burned out. I’m glad we made the choice we did.

    I REALLY like the Durango, but there’s nothing about long term quality there.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Tim’s photography makes me want to sell every vehicle I have (and move to a mostly-deserted tropical island far, far away from Chicago).

    [You never take my advice, but here goes: When photographing a vehicle, include *one* vehicle in the photograph. Simplify the background (appropriate use of zoom can help). Huge negative points for including trash receptacles in the glamour shot of an automotive stylist’s life’s work. The weather and the body colors on that vehicle didn’t help any, but you made things way worse than they needed to be.]

    Here’s a thought: A serious professional website should have a serious professional photographer.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Trashcan photos, especially with the lid up have spawned multiple memes.

      The most common one is the PA announcement, “will the owner of the ……(insert brand) report to the parking lot. You left your hood up.”

    • 0 avatar
      Tim Healey

      I am trying to improve, and I think I have a decent eye for photos, but you’re right, I am no pro. If you’d like to chip in budget money so we could afford a pro, go ahead. Otherwise you’re stuck with me.

      Your concerns about the background aren’t unheeded. But there aren’t many great photo locations near my home and I really can’t stop people from parking nearby.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        Don’t feel too bad. Check out the pictures on Farago’s last review.

        thetruthaboutcars.com/2013/10/review-
        mercedes-cls550-by-r-farago/

      • 0 avatar
        theflyersfan

        Plus, there really is only one color that sums up most of the Midwest between November and March and that’s that steel gray with a side of off-white slush that makes up most of the color palate.

        And I swear that you can actually see the wind come off of the lakes in the dead of winter. Between the total lack of color and the cold ripping straight to your bones, let’s face it, most of the time, the Midwest just sucks in the winter and has one looking at travel sites for points south and west of here.

        But I do like that color on the Durango.

      • 0 avatar
        ToolGuy

        @Tim,

        Chicago is known for its architecture (even on what would be ‘mundane’ buildings in other cities). Think outside the parking lot. Park in front of a relatively interesting old building (even a warehouse). Put your favorite restaurant in the background. Something, anything other than a wasteland ‘park’ with naked trees and broken pavement. If you are shooting with your smartphone, wipe the lens off and set the zoom at 2.0 (for starters) or even 3.0 – this will significantly tighten up any background clutter.

        “can’t stop people from parking nearby” is a non-excuse. YOU have the keys to the car and YOU are holding the camera. Therefore YOU control everything that is in the background. You do not need a huge open space to photograph a single vehicle well.

        Seems like I’m being hard on you. Welcome to the automotive industry. You will recall that your site doesn’t pull a lot of punches with automakers. I wasn’t sure if you were ignoring my advice completely or if I was still seeing ‘old’ (pre-advice) pictures. Now we know.

        Not looking for perfection. At least I offer constructive suggestions and not ‘hit and run’ cheap shots, correct? :-)

        Cities are know for containing humans (or used to be). It IS allowed to have actual people (super attractive or otherwise) in a photograph of an automobile.

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      ToolGuy, while there is validity in you suggestions, we get to enjoy TTAC for free. So, I’m ok with photos that are not magazine-perfect as long as the written content is done well and is actually informative.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      I was recently critical of the photography in a piece that contained several versions of the same viewpoints, and none of the interior. Tim explained that many of his shots turned out crappy for that piece, and he had to go with what he had.

      It happens.

      The photos for this piece are adequate for my taste. YMMV.

      Motor Trend seems to offer 70 professional-grade photos for their reviews, but that comes at a price. The price is not necessarily monetary. The price is knowing that you may be reading a puff piece written by the first journalists contacted by the mfr. Baruth warned us about that kind of access.

      I read TTAC reviews because they offer me a real-world perspective and a time delay after launch (often), without the hyperventilation of first reveals. I can find instrumented 0-60 times, skidpad numbers, and glossy sunset photos elsewhere, not to mention videos of varying quality.

      So on this subject I’m feeling generous today… until I’m not. :)

  • avatar
    Dan

    At one level I’m glad that this exists but I have trouble coming up with someone who’d appreciate this but wouldn’t be about fifty times happier with their 392 in one of the LX cars instead. All of the loud and obnoxious, and faster, and cooler looking, and $25,000 off.

    How have they not 392d the Ram yet?

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Will Dodge ever make a new vehicle again? The differences between this and an 11-year-old Durango R/T are relatively minor.

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    I like this alot however the outside size vs inside size is a compromise. I would love for it to have about 3 more inches of leg room in the second and third row.

  • avatar
    kcflyer

    I like it.

  • avatar

    Unfortunately you can’t get a 2nd row bench in these. Captains only. So for me I would go with the RT with tow and Go package, which gets you SRT wheels brakes and most importantly the SRT exhaust system, along with the SRT tow rating. That would make the same fun sounds pulling off from a light but keeping the price around 55K.

  • avatar
    blppt

    I hate SUVs, but even I have to admit this is a badass looking one.

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