By on June 28, 2021

A report from Axios shows that Toyota has given $55,000 to 37 Republican politicians who objected to the certification of Joe Biden’s election as president of the United States.

That’s about a quarter of the number of GOP pols who voted against certifying Biden’s win.

Axios notes that one of the politicians that the automaker donated to is Andy Biggs, a Republican House representative from Arizona who was a driving force behind the “Stop the Steal” rally that preceded the insurrection in Washington on January 6.

When Axios asked about it, an unnamed Toyota spokesman answered in a blitz of bewildering hypocrisy.

“We do not believe it is appropriate to judge members of Congress solely based on their votes on the electoral certification,” Toyota emailed Axios. “Based on our thorough review, we decided against giving to some members who, through their statements and actions, undermine the legitimacy of our elections and institutions.”

That seems hypocritical to my eyes — or at the very least, it seems like Toyota is trying to have it both ways. You can’t say that you don’t think it appropriate to judge members of Congress only on whether they voted against election certification and then turn around and say you won’t give to SOME members who undermined the legitimacy of elections — since EVERYONE who voted against certification was working to undermine our democracy.

To be clear, this isn’t a partisan position that I am taking. You know by now that your author leans left politically, but I’d be saying the same if it was Democrats voting against the certification of a Republican president based on nonexistent evidence of fraud. I’d also be saying this if I was a conservative and/or Republican (not always the same thing) who was disappointed Biden won.

This isn’t partisan, nor is it a reasonable debate that can be had by opposing sides. It’s about reality, which isn’t up for debate. A certain segment of the GOP ignored reality voted not to certify Joe Biden’s victory for no reason other than an attempt to retain power and/or humor the fringier/crazier elements of the party’s base. There is no evidence of fraud — Joe Biden won and Donald Trump lost, fair and square.

And now Toyota is giving money to 37 of those politicians. It’s unlikely that Toyota, as a company, believes the election was stolen. It’s also unlikely that Toyota prefers the ideology of one party over another — indeed, data from OpenSecrets shows Toyota actually gave more to Democrats than Republicans in 2020. I understand that Toyota’s giving, like that of any other large company, is strategic, meant to influence politicians of both parties into working towards policy that would benefit Toyota and/or the automotive industry as a whole.

I reached out to Toyota and a spokesperson sent this statement, which includes the sentences Axios highlighted: “Toyota’s PAC, by design, is bipartisan in nature and we contribute equally to the Democratic and Republican party. Toyota supports candidates based on their position on issues that are important to the auto industry and the company. We do not believe it is appropriate to judge members of Congress solely based on their votes on the electoral certification. Based on our thorough review, we decided against giving to some members who, through their statements and actions, undermine the legitimacy of our elections and institutions.”

For better or worse, companies giving to both parties has been the standard operating procedure. Big company X donates to politicians from both sides in order to influence policy out of self-interest. It might seem scummy to those of us who can’t buy influence, but it’s logical and legal.

But things changed in January. A swath of Congress voted to nullify the results of a free and fair election. And they didn’t do so for any good-faith reason — they used evidence-free claims of election fraud in a grab for power and/or to appease an unhinged element of their party’s base. Big corporations should not be rewarding such behavior.

Anyone, Republican or Democrat or Independent, who voted against certifying the election should be professionally punished for attempting to undermine our democracy. Actions have consequences. Companies like Toyota should cast aside self-interest and deny these ghouls the funds they need to stay in power. Continuing to donate just gives them the impression that they can do what they want, no matter how damaging it is to this country, without repercussions.

Sadly, the reality is that when money and morals collide, money often wins out. And Toyota, like any other big company, certainly has reasons to continue to donate to those whose lies helped inspire an insurrection.

It would be better for America, if not necessarily Toyota, if the automaker (and every other company listed in the Axios piece) cut off the seditionists. But considering that the only people being held accountable for their actions are the Joe and Jane Six-packs who got caught infiltrating the Capitol on January 6, I won’t hold my breath for anyone to say “enough is enough” any time soon.

[Image: Toyota]

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221 Comments on “Opinion: Toyota’s Political Giving Encourages the Big Lie...”


  • avatar
    Matt Posky

    Disavowed.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Even Motor Trend followed Tim’s lead on this one.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Motor Trend is a joint venture with the company that owns the Discovery Channel, and the former itself is owned by a hedge fund. So much like the Washington Post is no longer a credible political news source since it shills for Bezos, Motor Trend is (and never was) a credible political news source because it will 100% shill for its owners in Wall Street and the oligarchy in general.

        What’s funny is how the oligarchy in general really seems to hate President Trump despite the fact he is on the same socioeconomic strata. Whether its because the ideas he is a proponent of are counter to their interests, they simply hate him on a personal level, or some combination should be taken into account when consuming their propaganda.

        However of course that’s part of critical thinking and I was shocked to learn from a woman on Reddit that she was not taught these skills at all in public grade school and high school, literally only being exposed to them in college (she started the thread saying something to the effect of “people are not brainwashed by leftists in college, that’s where you learn critical thinking” to my reply “I started learning that in the seventh grade”). The exchange really helped explain the nation’s current situation, I had no idea how bad the public schools really were since maybe 2000/05.

        • 0 avatar
          Astigmatism

          “What’s funny is how the oligarchy in general really seems to hate President Trump despite the fact he is on the same socioeconomic strata.”

          If your point is that there isn’t a single group of rich “elites” who all agree on everything, and people’s hatred of Trump isn’t due to his socioeconomic strata, and more about the stuff he’s said and done – well, then I’m not sure what your point is, because, well, yeah.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            What benefits his portfolio likely benefits theirs so unless he was taking one for Team America and his policies/ideas are counterproductive, their business interests should be somewhat aligned. So given that, why the hate from the oligarchy?

          • 0 avatar
            Astigmatism

            Well, a few reasons, like:

            – They may not think that tax cuts or deregulation alone are as good for the market as stability, relatively free international trade, and a properly functioning government that allows our society to make the most of its human capital.

            – They may have other priorities beyond tax cuts: Democrats routinely campaign on raising taxes for people in my income bracket, but that doesn’t stop me from voting for them.

            – They may have found him to be a uniquely noxious, divisive, anti-democratic influence on our country and our culture, and may abhor his social, environmental, and other policies.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @Astigmatism

            Good points. I agree they and most people desire some kind of societal order but they already own or have favor with elements of government that making it truly functional again is not in their interest (if we go back far enough, I have no doubt we seen similar behavior since the 1910s or earlier i.e. Congress beholden to the rich etc.). I would also argue “free” trade as currently defined in the WTO is certainly in their best interest but not necessarily in the people of the US.

            Very true, without further research its difficult to do anything but guess. I do know an oligarchy enjoys expanded power in a State Capitalism model similar to what the PRC is doing and perhaps that is where they want to go which is counter to Trump’s nationalism.

            Obviously open to opinion but today’s Democratic Party on the national stage is left of center Socialist at best with dangerous Far Left elements while the Republican Party nationally is centrist closer to the Democrats prior to Bill Clinton minus the unions. While there are Far Right elements in this party, they seem to be weaker than the Far Left elements in the opposition party.

            On your last point yes it may very well be personal on the beef between the oligarchs and Trump in addition to business. Trump further polarized the nation but it was the Obama administration who set up a very divided country prior to 2016, and when the process of hollowing out the middle class began through Fed policies after 2010. A more united country would have produced more than a razor thin victory margin (in either direction).

            Since we are on this general subject, you may enjoy this documentary of the 1992 presidential campaign which focuses on satellite feeds which were never intended to be aired:

            https://www.filmsforaction.org/watch/spin/

  • avatar
    VWGolfGuy

    Cancel culture comes for Toyota…

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      ..this will be fun!

    • 0 avatar
      Tim Healey

      I hardly think criticizing a company’s actions — something that I am paid to do, at least on occasion, mind you — equates to “cancel culture.”

      All I did was suggest Toyota not give to 37 politicians who denied reality. I didn’t suggest a boycott. But even if I did, that would hardly be a cancellation, since no one is obligated to actually boycott.

      • 0 avatar
        Dave M.

        Very well said, Tim. I wholeheartedly agree.

      • 0 avatar
        MyNameisGroot

        Really starting to warm up to Toyota now. Might be time to buy one of those Klingon mates with Transformer set of wheels. Maybe two…

      • 0 avatar
        Old_WRX

        Tim Healey,

        “Anyone, Republican or Democrat or Independent, who voted against certifying the election should be professionally punished for attempting to undermine our democracy.”

        I’m a bit lost. You seem to imply that everyone had to vote for certifying the election. What, in heaven’s name, is the point of voting if everyone has to vote the way you think they should? If they don’t they should be “professionally punished.” I think you are trying to say that they should lose their jobs, but it could be that the “professional” part means they should be spanked by a (professional) dominatrix. Assuming for he sake of argument that you mean the former, that is exactly “Cancel Culture.”

        “the insurrection in Washington on January 6”

        If that was the ultra-dangerous right’s best attempt at an insurrection, I think they more deserve sympathy than censure. I mean, they forgot to bring their guns. How pathetic! But, I do see the dangerous part — just imagine such incredibly incompetent dodos operating dangerous machinery, or driving!

        • 0 avatar
          tonycd

          Old_WRX, you ask “What, in heaven’s name, is the point of voting if everyone has to vote the way you think they should?”

          I guess you’re talking about members of Congress. But the irony is, your position is that regular voters SHOULD have to vote the way you think they should. Because your implied support of Jan. 6 rioters—and whether you play it coy or not, that’s what it is— means that you support a buch of goons who tried to violently toss out the results of an election that didn’t go the way they wanted.

          So your attempt to pose as too cool for school fails a simple logic test.

          • 0 avatar
            Old_WRX

            tonycd,

            “Because your implied support of Jan. 6 rioters”

            I in no way shape or form support the rioting on Jan 6. The whole thing was extremely ill advised. But, referring to that mess as an insurrection is mendacious.

            “But the irony is, your position is that regular voters SHOULD have to vote the way you think they should.”

            I don’t think they should have to vote in accordance with my thinking, nor in accordance with Healey’s thinking.

            “you support a buch of goons”

            I on no way support any of the outside agitators present at the Jan 6 protest at the Capitol. Furthermore, I do not support the goons behind the violence at all the riots of 2020-2021.

            I do not support violence, terrorism, bigotry (whether called “racism” or “anti-racism”), identity politics, propaganda, character assassination, gratuitously labeling one’s opponents “terrorists,” canceling, etc.

      • 0 avatar
        thornmark

        I’ll bet you were a big supporter of the Russian Collusion Hoax too

        that was far worse than anything that happened on Jan 6

      • 0 avatar
        tomLU86

        Don’t backtrack Mr. Healey. You didn’t suggest, you invoked “money and morals”. Look in the mirror buddy. Look at this website. It’s here for money. You provide some amusement and entertainment, perhaps a nugget of news, and your advertisers get to see us.

        I didn’t know you’re paid to criticize–that’s a great job, as you will never run out of topics.

        And given many of your articles and editorials, like this one, neither will the commentariat run out of things to criticize.

        The reality is that YOU PERSONALLY disagree with the views of those 37 politicians, on that issue.

        But perhaps that issue does not trump (pun intended) other issues. Maybe they stood up against putting more ethanol in gasoline. Maybe they balked at subsidizing products that don’t benefit Toyota.

        So, as Toyota said, they considered many facets.

        If you totally disagree, write to Toyota and don’t buy their cars. You get your cars for free anyway. Go ahead, boycott the best run automaker on the planet.

        I’ve boycotted them my whole life, because their superb cars were boring, but now that all cars are boring, their stock is up. And reactionss like yours and Lorenzo’s on the other site, only improve Toyota’s reputation, to me.

        You have the microphone here.

        If you’re going to editorialize about political matters, you might start with traffic cameras. Too much methanol/ethanol in gasoline. The fact a large portion of state motor fuel taxes are diverted to anything but the roads.

        America has much bigger problems to worry about than the fact that 37 polticians didn’t vote as you would like. The American political process has been slowly decaying for decades, as the middle class has gotten more squeezed and as what passed for “common values” have become less common.

        I see nothing that will make this trend end. When the center gets thin, there is not middle ground. We will see.

        But for now, I salute Toyota for not kowtowing (pun intended) to political correctness.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Curious. Did the parent company of this site return the money they were given to run the Lexus IS500 “sponsored content”?

        Did you return the portion of the paycheck that those ads provided you? No? Everyone is always outraged until it effects their own bottom line

        As an aside, I shot this link to Toyota’s advertising folks. They likely get far more bang for their buck with those senators anyway than the staff here which I’m not even certain likes cars anymore and may want to allocate the “sponsored content” accordingly in the future.

        This isn’t even terrible journalism though. Curious…why do only your political pieces incorporate this sort of edginess? I’d welcome it in the car articles which sadly, err towards regurgitated press releases

        Google Better Schmidt + B9 Tribeca. That’s how this site once did edgy and that isn’t even from the golden era.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          My mistake…went back for a read ..that was Fargo era. There was a day when this site would publish stuff like that as well as being quoted in White House Press Briefings (The Death Watches). How the mighty have fallen.

  • avatar
    ajla

    “but I’d be saying the same if it was Democrats voting against the certification of a Republican president”

    “Anyone, Republican or Democrat or Independent, who voted against certifying the election should be professionally punished for attempting to undermine our democracy”

    FWIW
    cnn.com/2017/01/06/politics/electoral-
    college-vote-count-objections/index.html

    • 0 avatar
      Tim Healey

      Not quite equivalent to what happened here. There are fair reasons to challenge elections, but there was no evidence of fraud in 2020. And Clinton conceded, anyway.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        “There are fair reasons to challenge elections”
        At the *electoral college certification* level I think that bar is very, very high.
        Does that mean you think those objections given in 2016 by Democratic members of Congress to not certify the results of the electoral college for certain states were proper?

        “And Clinton conceded, anyway.”
        Which isn’t a criteria you put in your editorial. And isn’t part of the Constitution either.

        I have no love (or votes) for Trump but your principals sound squishier than originally stated.

      • 0 avatar
        bullnuke

        “And Clinton conceded, anyway”. As did President Donald Trump, Thursday, January 7, 2021. As for Toyota and the corporations donations to politicians, they are free to donate to whomever they choose within the law. Toyota, a Japanese entity, is not afraid of the sometimes outrageous bullying of some folks in the United States and utilizes the right of free speech, a right that many US entities are afraid to likewise utilize. Good for them.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          If Trump conceded he must have immediately taken it back because as of Saturday at his Ohio rally he still claims it was stolen and as of Sunday we have this…

          “”It was all bullsh!t.”

          That’s what Bill Barr told me he thought of Trump’s claims of election in an astonishingly candid interview for my upcoming book on the final days of the Trump Presidency – one of many on-the-record interviews for my book.”

          “Last November, @LeaderMcConnell
          pleaded with Barr to publicly shoot down Trump’s claims of election fraud.

          “Look, we need the president in Georgia,” he told Barr, “and so we cannot be frontally attacking him right now…You are really the only one who can do it.”

          https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2021/06/william-barrs-trump-administration-attorney-general/619298/

          • 0 avatar
            thornmark

            Barr told people to stop looking for fraud – and Barr never looked himself

            Barr hid the biden laptop and let the lying MSM and Tech companies censor and lie about its existence – they called it a conspiracy theory or Russian disinformation – only the NYPost published the truth and got kicked off Big Tech for doing so – the rest of the orchestrated media was all in for the demented joe

            by letting the biden laptop lie prevail, Barr was in effect working for the Dems – once the story was out there Barr had an obligation to not let that Big Lie prevail, but he did nothing – he could have brought the biden campaign down w/ that single truth but chose to act politically instead

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          @bullnuke:

          Since when is paying off politicians “free speech”?

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Campaign contributions are free speech. You may not like it or agree, but the Supreme Court has affirmed the idea.

      • 0 avatar
        Matt Posky

        She did and she didn’t…

        youtube.com/watch?v=77i_pC3lp04

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        “…there was no evidence of fraud in 2020…”

        Tim,

        this is simply a lie. Recent local news from Georgia:
        “Fulton County election official admitted that chain of custody documents for absentee ballots placed into drop boxes during the 2020 election are “missing” or “misplaced.””

        From Michigan:
        “In the Qualified Voter File (QVF), a list of the citizens eligible to cast votes, maintained by the Secretary of State, there are 616,648 ineligible voters falsely listed as eligible. Moreover, 12.23 percent of absentee voters did not request absentee ballots.”

        So, when you see these 12% of absentee voters who did not have record of request – this is fraud.

        And your “no evidence of fraud” is out of the window.

        • 0 avatar
          JD-Shifty

          trump is on tape asking people to “find votes”..HAHAHAHAHAHAHA

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          Two more bull$h!t claims in the long line.

          Georgia: all but a tiny number of the documents in fact were available. https://www.gpb.org/news/2021/06/17/fact-check-fulton-county-not-missing-ballots-or-hundreds-of-drop-box-custody-forms
          (Of course, right-wing sites never mention this.)

          Michigan: The Republican leadership in the State Senate (no doubt in the tank for Biden, or something) debunked these claims. See pages 8-11 of the report here: https://misenategopcdn.s3.us-east-1.amazonaws.com/99/doccuments/20210623/SMPO_2020ElectionReport.pdf

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            “think tank”, “fact check”

            LOL. May be they can give you a job.

            Everything is well documented

            https://georgiastarnews.com/2021/06/13/chain-of-custody-documents-view-all-the-ballot-transfer-forms-from-the-november-2020-election-provided-by-fulton-county-to-the-georgia-star-news/

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Yes, my link directly rebuts yours, with primary-source evidence. If you choose to keep your head in the sand, that’s your right, but none of the rest of us have to take you seriously.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          “there are 616,648 ineligible voters falsely listed as eligible”

          616-648 is the area code and prefix for Grand Rapids Michigan. What a coincidence. That little claim of yours doesn’t show up when I try to google it.

          • 0 avatar
            Old_WRX

            mcs,

            Try a different search engine like duckduckgo.com.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            “like duckduckgo.com.”

            And that comes up with just one nutcase with claims a Michigan Republican-led commission investigating election fraud calls lies. In fact, you can see that they made up the number by taking the 6 numbers of a local area code and exchange. I could pull up that original data, but that commission did that so I’m not going to bother.

            Here’s a letter debunking the idiot you tried to point me to and debunks the garbage phone-number-inspired statistics you quoted.

            https://drive.google.com/file/d/1u9fEBFnLbPan0r5uDYboKaKo5C_ezzSz/view

        • 0 avatar
          thornmark

          you are correct, there was plenty of fraud – which is why the Dems are fighting so hard to stop transparency

      • 0 avatar
        285exp

        Clinton still claims Trump was not legitimately elected, so does Pelosi, Biden said it too, how are they any different than Trump? Stacy Abrams, the not Governor of Georgia claims her election was stolen, where’s the outrage there, Tim? Either baselessly questioning the legitimacy of elections is bad or it’s not, it can’t depend on whose election you don’t like.

        Did Toyota donate to these people because they dispute that the election was fair, or do we now cancel any company or person who donate to anyone who you disagree with?

        This was a blatant troll, with just the barest of a connection to the auto industry so you can claim it belongs on this site.

        • 0 avatar
          Old_WRX

          285exp,

          “do we now cancel any company or person who donate to anyone who you disagree with?”

          Unfortunately it seems to be heading that way more and more.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Was this really necessary?

    With that said, there are a few markers that are needed in a thread about this sad topic:

    (1) THe Big Lie is, in fact, a Big Lie. Absolutely not one out of the entire sorry collection of always out-of-context and often just plain wrong scraps of ‘evidence’ of fraud in the 2020 election stands up. Not a single one. It’s nothing more than a bunch of bull$h!t. All of the Trump-appointed judges knew that, AG Barr knew that, Mitch McConnell knew that, and every single GOP congressperson should have known it.

    (2) The most important thing that happened on January 6 was not a bunch of people who had been misinformed by OAN and Citizen Free Press breaking in and threatening the safety of Congress. It was the GOP congresspeople who should have known better, because they all had ample and easy access to correct information, hyping the Big Lie out of either subservience to or fear of Donald Trump. Every last one of them abandoned their integrity for pure political expedience, knowing that to cross Trump is a political death sentence in today’s Republican Party, no matter how blatant the lies he tells.

    (3) Trump has set us on a path that it will be very difficult to escape. If a Democrat (whether Joe Biden or someone else) wins the 2024 election, there is no way that the GOP will accept the legitimacy of the win. State legislatures will nullify the will of their own voters, and if they don’t, Congress will refuse to do its constitutional duty and certify the winner of the Electoral College. Trump has shown that he will exile the few remaining people with integrity from the GOP and the result is that they will not treat any national election a Democrat wins as legitimate, no matter how well the election is run. We are headed to a very dark place and I don’t see how we stop it as long as everyone in one of the parties is this afraid of a lying con man.

    I would

    • 0 avatar
      Tim Healey

      Are any of our opinions really “necessary?” Lol. I did start this piece as a straight newser but felt it worked better, especially for TTAC’s mission, as an op-ed/rant.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      To add, since I hit “post” prematurely:

      Even though I’m well left of center politically, I would love to see the GOP return to a position of integrity and strength. We need a good conservative party to keep the left honest. But right now we don’t have that. Conservatives with integrity are politically homeless; some are voting for Democrats out of a sense of emergency, while others are disengaging. The demise of Trump and Trumpism, and the return of an honest conservatism to America, can’t come fast enough.

      • 0 avatar
        deanst

        People outside the U.S. (and many inside) would argue that America needs a good liberal party. When your “liberal” party refuses to increase the minimum wage above 7 bucks, offer government provided health care, or stop bombing places like Syria, you may want to reconsider what you think is liberal.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          @deanst: So true!

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          “People outside the U.S. (and many inside) would argue that America needs a good liberal party.”

          I’m guessing those people also don’t have a great understanding about government processes in the United States.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          It’s one thing to get the policy wrong (as the Democrats often do, if you assume they should be representing their voters). It’s quite another to have your party taken over by misinformation and conspiracy theories, which is pretty much where the Republicans are today.

          • 0 avatar
            mmreeses

            essentially, you’re saying that you are happy drinking a bucket of diarrhea instead of eating a platter of turd in buns.

            no wonder the country is as messed up as it is.

          • 0 avatar
            Old_WRX

            dal20402,

            “It’s quite another to have your party taken over by misinformation and conspiracy theories, which is pretty much where the Republicans are today.”

            You forgot “distractions.” If you’re going to mention all the things that the left uses to attempt to discredit opinions they don’t like — when they don’t have any real argument — then you can’t forget “distraction.”

            This notion that the Democrats are so pure is nothing short of bizarre. When politicians wage a campaign of propaganda to cast aspersions on their opponents and give the illusion that they are so altruistic you can be sure they are full of poop. Especially when they start using terms as juvenile as “conspiracy theorist” and “misinformation.”

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Democrats are normal politicians. Sometimes they lie, sometimes they’re wrong, but they operate in a universe of information that is mostly factual most of the time.

            Most Republicans, with some notable and commendable exceptions, choose to operate in a closed universe of false information. That has been slowly worsening over the last couple of decades but it took a crisis like the Big Lie to make it obvious to everyone outside the closed universe. See slavuta below–he posts a made-up story, I post the factual rebuttal, and he just posts another copy of the original story without addressing the facts in the rebuttal at all, since he can’t.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          America needs a good political party…period

          • 0 avatar
            Old_WRX

            Art,

            “America needs a good political party”

            You got that right, but isn’t “good political party” an oxymoron

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @deanst – very true. If anything, the Democrats of the USA would be closer to the conservative party in Canada as far as real world values.

      • 0 avatar
        thornmark

        wonder if we’ll ever see an honest Dem party – they lied for 4 straight years about virtually everything and continue to this day – like crazy Nancy stating that demented joe “solved the border”

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      I’d be very surprised if #3 happens. Despite everything, “flipped” red states governments and Pence still held their ground against Trump and in 2024 a Democrat VP will be overseeing the electoral college certification.

      I don’t think anyone in the GOP (except *maybe* Trump himself) thinks they could have overturned that election. It was just massive grandstanding, but politicians don’t seem to care that their words actually do impact people that aren’t always just in it for a LARP.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Well, as the whole certification sh*t show demonstrated a few months ago, the VP’s role is truly ceremonial. Given that, I don’t think having Kamala Harris – or any other VP – in charge of the certification will make any difference.

        And I agree with ajla – I don’t think anyone really figured any of the ex-prez’s antics were going to make a difference, and I believe that includes the ex-prez himself. This was just a way to create a red-meat issue to toss at the hardcore GOP base to justify the real intent – voting-law restrictions. Those WILL have an impact.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          Question @ FreedMike. Is it racist to require an ID or is it racist to assume a member of a particular race is too stupid to get an ID?

          Most of the so called restrictions people support involve having ID to vote.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @Art:

            Take race out of the question. The restrictions don’t make a damn bit of sense. To wit:

            1) We don’t have voter ID laws here in Colorado. Have you heard about widespread voter fraud here? Yeah, neither have I. In fact, a (very Republican) secretary of state launched an exhaustive voter fraud investigation a few years back. Know how many voters he found that were potentially fraudulent? About a hundred…in a state with over five million residents.

            2) My last ballot was placed in a collection box that sits outside the rec center in Broomfield, Colorado, and you drop your ballot off there 24/7. There are similar collection boxes all over metro Denver. Have you heard about any widespread issues with these ballot collection boxes? In fact, I haven’t heard about a single issue.

            3) How, precisely, does handing someone a bottle of water while he or she is waiting in line to vote threaten democracy? Yeah, I can’t figure that out either.

            It’s not that this stuff is racist per se – it’s just stupid, and unnecessary. We should be making it EASIER to vote, not harder.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            The water stuff is probably a little silly. However I have no peoblem with requiring ID to vote simply to maintain faith in our elections. We didn’t have a problem with airport security either until we did.

            If you want to talk about making it easier to vote by opening more precients to cut down wait times, early voting, or whatever, I am down with that.

            But simply having someone flash an ID like they have to to buy a 6 pack of Nattys is not burdensome and would quell 90 percent of the arguements that someone is cheating. When you drop the ballot off you scan a photo ID.

            If we are worried about the poor then put a freaking picture on EBT cards.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @Art:

            The “voter ID thing” is not the hill I’m going to die on, but my point is that it feels like this – and other restrictions – are solutions to problems that aren’t really that problematic to begin with. We should be making it easier and quicker to vote, versus making it more complex and difficult.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            “In a recent poll by Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, 74 percent of Pennsylvania responders, including Republicans, Democrats, and Independents, said they support voter ID, and 81percent support signature verification. According to a recent Monmouth University poll, nationally 80 percent of Americans support voter ID.”

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            None of these rules seem to increase complexity. Showing an ID is something people do on a regular basis for all manner of tasks to include buying scratch offs, beer and cigs.

            And bringing your own water and a Snickers bar is a dumb rule imho, but it hardly adds complexity.

            I don’t like limiting early voting though, barring some reason like the cost of staffing those sites for a long period of time being too expensive. Still, people voting before the debates are over is more a reflection on them. Honestly you could just have those sorts indicate their party at registration and tally it up. Idiots

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            And I would argue that things to ensure faith in elections are a good idea right now.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            “How, precisely, does handing someone a bottle of water while he or she is waiting in line to vote threaten democracy?”

            Again, confused Mike getting into this groove. It is clear referring to Georgia law, where it is referring to solicitation

            “No person shall solicit votes in any manner or by any means or method, nor shall any person distribute or display any campaign material, nor shall any person give, offer to give, or participate in the giving of any money or gifts, including, but not limited to, food and drink, to an elector, nor shall any person solicit signatures for any petition, nor shall any person, other than election officials discharging their duties, establish or set up any tables or booths on any day in which ballots are being cast.”

            However, the water can be served by workers of the polling place. phew!

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        There are many well-informed people on both sides who agree with your take. Right now I feel more pessimistic but I hope you’re right and I’m wrong.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Really lost a lot of respect for you Mr. Healy, this is exactly what many do not wish to read on an automotive focused website. Mr. Posky had been implied in the past of taking something 90% political and finding a 10% automotive bent, what you’ve done is just as if not more egregious.

    Here are some *big lies* of the past thirty years:

    “Read my lips, no new taxes”.

    “I did not have sexual relations with that woman, Miss Lewinsky”.

    “Iraq does in fact possess weapons of mass destruction”.

    “We have to pass the bill, so that you can find out what is in it”.

    “If you like your doctor, you can keep your doctor”.

    “Turns out I’m really good at killing people”.

    No wait the last one is true.

    https://www.businessinsider.com/obama-said-hes-really-good-at-killing-people-2013-11

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      You forgot the Pearl Harbor “myth” that secret service knew about the attack and had not warn the base.

      “Iraq does in fact possess weapons of mass destruction”.
      Actually, in the first Gulf War, US did find that Iraq was months from a nuke and it was a total surprise to everyone. If Saddam did not take Kuwait he would have nukes. And that was 2nd time Iraq could have them
      https://fas.org/nuke/guide/iraq/nuke/program.htm

      1st time Israel took care of this
      https://nationalinterest.org/blog/buzz/how-israels-air-force-crushed-saddam-husseins-nuclear-weapons-dream-63807

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        The Secret Service had nothing to do with the attack on Pearl Harbor. While the Japanese diplomatic codes were broken, the naval JN-25 code while being “solved” earlier in the year was not readable until early in 1942. The Japanese did not send its embassies information about a sneak attack, and even if they had put this information over the naval code it was not readable at the time.

        While I do believe the Roosevelt Administration did want the Japanese to make the first move so the US could enter the war, I do not believe the US had the time and place of where the Japanese would strike. From everything I’ve read, they were anticipating at attack on the Philippines.

        “The Japanese code dubbed “Purple”, which was used by the Foreign Office and only for diplomatic (but not for military) messages, was broken by Army cryptographers in 1940. A 14-part message using this code, sent from Japan to its embassy in Washington, was decoded in Washington on 6 and 7 December. The message, which made plain the Japanese intention to break off diplomatic relations with the United States, was to be delivered by the Japanese ambassador at 1 p.m. Washington time (dawn in the Pacific). The SIS decoded the first 13 parts of the message, but did not decode the 14th part of the message until it was too late (Intelligence). [60]***Colonel Rufus S. Bratton, then serving as an aide to Marshall, took this to mean that the Japanese intended to attack at dawn somewhere in the Pacific***. Marshall ordered a warning message sent to American bases in the area, including Hawaii. Due to atmospheric transmission conditions the message was sent out via Western Union over its undersea cable rather than over the military radio channels; the message was not received until the attack was already underway.[61]

        ***The claim no pre-attack IJN message expressly mentioned Pearl Harbor is perhaps true***. The claims that no Purple traffic pointed to Pearl Harbor may also be true, as the Foreign Office was not well thought of by the military and during this period was routinely excluded from sensitive or secret material, including war planning. It is also possible any such intercepts were not translated until after the attack, or indeed, after the war ended; some messages were not.[62] In both instances, all traffic from these pre-attack intercepts has not yet been declassified and released to the public domain. Hence, any such claims are now indeterminate, pending a fuller accounting.”

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pearl_Harbor_advance-knowledge_conspiracy_theory

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_naval_codes

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          28,
          don’t forget this – wikipedia is doctored from DC. This is a well known fact. You can trust car pages, soccer pages… I wouldn’t trust pages that touch important historical events.

          Check this
          https://nationalinterest.org/blog/buzz/did-navy-codebreakers-know-japan-was-going-strike-pearl-harbor-135832

          • 0 avatar
            Old_WRX

            28,

            I’ll have to side with slavuta on the total lack of trustworthiness of wikipedia on anything remotely political. They have a very radical leftist orientation.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I agree Wikipedia is not a trusted source, but is a baseline to begin investigation. However the meat of the National Interest article is on December 4, 1941 a “smoking gun” message was sent over the J-19 lesser diplomatic code indicating prepare for a possible break in relations as previous messages in November 1941 were to indicate one of three breaks in diplomatic ties (Britain, USSR, USA). I’m not going to re-read the Wiki page but the article is referring to something other than what I cited above.

            So the crux of the argument is on Thursday December 4th, 1941 the Pentagon intercepted a warning message on a lesser diplomatic code which implied prepare for a upcoming break in US/Japanese relations. I’m all for a good conspiracy, this doesn’t strike me as one. My guess is they were waiting for something over the Purple diplomatic code and according to Wikipedia when it was received the Pentagon did send out warnings which were not received in time. Could an FYI been sent Friday December 5th “hey things may be brewing we’re waiting for confirmation”. Sure. Would it have made a difference? I’m not so sure.

            What may have made a difference was the reaction to the midget sub sinking by the USS Ward at 06:37 (or initial sighting of one by USS Condor at 03:42) combined with the early warning report from radar station north of Oahu or better, the radar station being made aware of that earlier sinking to emphasize the size of the force they were monitoring (can’t get a time for the radar event, attack began at 07:48)

            “As the first wave approached Oahu, it was detected by the U.S. Army SCR-270 radar at Opana Point near the island’s northern tip. This post had been in training mode for months, but was not yet operational.[92] The operators, Privates George Elliot Jr. and Joseph Lockard, reported a target.[93] But Lieutenant Kermit A. Tyler, a newly assigned officer at the thinly manned Intercept Center, presumed it was the scheduled arrival of six B-17 bombers from California. The ***Japanese planes were approaching from a direction very close (only a few degrees difference) to the bombers,[94] and while the operators had never seen a formation as large on radar, they neglected to tell Tyler of its size.***[95] Tyler, for security reasons, could not tell the operators of the six B-17s that were due (even though it was widely known)”

            Given communications of 1941, I am not surprised the Ward’s action of 06:37 was not general knowledge on radio traffic where the radar operators would know to speak up about the size of the force coming. However I do argue Admiral Kimmel should have not only been physically notified of the Ward’s action and called general quarters because destroyers should not be sinking *anything* outside a US base regardless of impending war. Especially given Kimmel -a prior aide to then Navy Secy and later President Roosevelt- made this statement:

            “On 18 February 1941, Kimmel wrote to the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), Admiral Harold Rainsford Stark:

            I feel that a surprise attack (submarine, air, or combined) on Pearl Harbor is a possibility, and we are taking immediate practical steps to minimize the damage inflicted and to ensure that the attacking force will pay.[12]”

            So even if the Pentagon or White house thought otherwise, he as CINC of the US Pacific Fleet personally was aware of the possibility of attack, yet by 07:15 at the latest general quarters should have been called due to the Ward’s action. Now if you want to talk conspiracy, why did Kimmel order two of the three US fleet carriers out of Pearl, one shortly before the attack and then neglect to sound general quarters after the Ward incident at 06:37? (Saratoga was in SF dry dock)

            “In November Kimmel ordered USS Enterprise to ferry Marine fighters and pilots to Wake Island to reinforce the garrison, and for USS Lexington to depart Pearl Harbor on 5 December to ferry Marine dive bombers to Midway. Because of these missions neither aircraft carrier was in Pearl Harbor during the later Japanese attack.”

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Husband_E._Kimmel

            I do believe the Roosevelt Administration in concert with the Pentagon was trying to lure the Japanese into war, but I don’t believe Pearl was thought of as a serious target in Washington. In fact the Japanese fleet left harbor the day before the American counter proposal was received, which suggests to me the Japanese gov’t assumed the counter proposal to be unacceptable but whose fleet would be only a day out and easily recalled should the proposal be accepted. So despite code intercepts there was no smoking gun before December 7th indicating an attack was forthcoming but I find it extremely interesting a personal contact to Roosevelt ordered one carrier out of Pearl as negotiations broke down and then a second two days before attack. While reinforcing air cover in Wake and Midway is a wise strategic move (the Japanese did invade Wake on the way back from Pearl), its also quite convenient. It seems unlikely the CINC is somehow getting secret orders from the White House to move out carriers and essentially sabotage his command the day of the attack to then be literally disgraced the rest of his life and for all time but is perhaps a possibility. The genesis of this would be *who* came up with the idea to move the carriers when they did (Kimmel/his staff or orders from Washington) and was Kimmel generally speaking viewed as an incomptent in Washington who would bungle a response to an attack. If the JN-19 messages from November 19th and decoded on December 4th were received by the Pentagon who then ordered Kimmel to put Lexington to sea December 5th, we may have something.

            Incidentally my great uncle served as a radioman on the Enterprise from 1939/40-45 (can’t recall now). Unfortunately he died in 1989 and I doubt even if he was alive that he would remember radio traffic from 1941, unless maybe of it was highly suspect in hindsight.

            “The American counter-proposal of November 26 (November 27 in Japan), the Hull note, required Japan completely evacuate China without conditions and conclude non-aggression pacts with Pacific powers. On November 26 in Japan, the day before the note’s delivery, the Japanese task force left port for Pearl Harbor”

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attack_on_Pearl_Harbor

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          Basically, secrets not to be uncovered

  • avatar
    Cicero

    What is the purpose of this post? Did HuffPo turn it down?

    • 0 avatar
      VWGolfGuy

      And I’m sure Toyota and other auto makers made contributions to the reps/senators that denied reality on Trumps 2016 win with a four year narrative of Russian collusion. Trumps out, Biden is in, auto makers play both sides, this is a nothing event. Let go of the TDS.

  • avatar
    oitnb

    You mean the insurrection that never would have been successful, because you know, you can only really challenge the government with F-15’s or nukes?

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Get with the times, it was a peaceful protest.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      “because you know, you can only really challenge the government with F-15’s or nukes?”

      I suppose I missed the part where the insurgency in Iraq and Afghanistan brought the US Army to it’s knees with F15s and Nukes and not explosive made out of fertilizer and copper heat rounds with the platters pressed with car jacks.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    Well thank God this site is moving beyond political red meat! Anyhoo…I am just here for the poo flinging.

    As an aside, Bertel Schmidt was at least funny with his political rants. This is just some more whining.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Well, this thread is already a sh!tshow, so I’ll pass…

    … On the new Camry S-Edition

  • avatar
    BoredOOMM

    I find it disturbing that Toyota entered a political woke stance. I thought they sold cars and trucks. Disappointing that TTAC takes a stance in this argument also. I thought TTAC was about cars and trucks too. For a political fight, we do have Twitter.

  • avatar
    jimmyy

    I love Toyota. So should you.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Tim, although I agree much of your opinion, I also truly wonder about posting it here or in this format.

    Over the past 36 months it seems at least to me that ‘political’ columns and comments on this site get more responses than those related to automotive engineering, styling or performance comparisons.

    I would much prefer if we could move on from the ‘former guy’ and focus on this site primarily on what we have in common. Although I do acknowledge that the auto industry is highly influenced by legislation and political machinations.

    • 0 avatar
      Tim Healey

      You nail it in the final sentence. I don’t post this if it wasn’t about an automaker.

      We — as in all of TTAC, not just me — get political sometimes. But always, whether it’s a news story or a rant, there is SOME connection to cars.

      I get the desire to escape our toxic politics by reading about Broncos and Mustangs. I do. But politics and the auto industry are inextricably linked, and we’d be shirking our duty to be honest about the industry if we were too afraid to cover politics because it might alienate readers.

    • 0 avatar
      Yankee

      I’m with you Arthur. I think this was pure clickbait, and I’m surprised it came from Mr. Healey. I would expect this kind of thing from Posky, but I would hope cooler heads would prevail at the editorial meeting and even tighten the leash on him. A donation of $55,000 would be chump change to one candidate, but divide among 37 it amounts to lass than $1,500 a piece. You’re not even in My Pillow influence peddling at that point. America has always been a pay to play system, and hedging your bets across party lines has been the business norm for hundreds of years. This is a non-story. Sure Toyota’s explanation is hypocritical. Sounds like they gave the job to an underling with a poor grasp of English (love my old Honda manual that shows a headlight bulb and cautions not to “touch the grass”). But there is simply nothing to see here folks. It seems TTAC’s new strategy of not regurgitating press releases and presenting a different side of things has not sat well with its sponsors, who want clicks above all else. I only come here to learn from the comments of many regular readers who always make me think about things I never considered. The actual editorial content has been going downhill for some time now, as this piece shows.

  • avatar
    Astigmatism

    I, for one, am disgusted and appalled at Toyota

    ‘s terrible “Start Your Impossible” commercials that have been shown every six minutes during the US Olympic trials. Much like this piece, while the overall sentiment may be admirable, they have nothing whatsoever to do with cars.

    But I do have some popcorn popping, so there’s that.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    Eh, Toyota knows what thet are doing. Their core customers are oldsters. Oldsters tend to support that stuff. This makes their core demographic more likely to stay in the fold.

  • avatar
    ihatecults2

    Yet another partisan hack piece on a topic Tim knows even less about than cars.

  • avatar
    mmreeses

    liberal witter explodes.over $55k. meanwhile the DoD-CIA budget exceeds something like $800 billion.

    You all (liberal twitter or whatever you call yourselves) are the definition of useful idiots

  • avatar
    randy in rocklin

    Dang, didn’t know there were so many leftists here. There are are a few “conservative” thinkers here but I find it lacking.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      “There are are a few “conservative” thinkers here but I find it lacking.”

      With the exception of a few bloggers on this site, ““conservative” thinkers” is an oxymoron.

  • avatar
    multicam

    I miss the Vellum Venom articles. Remember those?

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    You can’t hate on cancel culture and then expect Toyota to cancel certain politicians for their wacky stance on the election.

    As Toyota says, subjects beyond what affects Toyota don’t concern Toyota. I wouldn’t expect – or want – more.

  • avatar
    Robert Schwartz

    If this web site is going to be another woke cancel culture pile of garbage, I am out.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    The bigger problem here isn’t Toyota giving to Republicans, or other companies giving to Democrats – it’s the literally insane amount of money that companies give publicly, or though lobbyists.

    If a company wants to make a political stand, then fine – it can spend as much money as it wants on commercials to advertise said stand. People watching the ads can either buy into the ad or switch the channel. But instead, the money’s being funneled to politicians with the implicit purpose of having them do the donor’s bidding, and that cuts voters completely out of the loop.

    funneling that money to politicians is nothing but legalized bribery, and it just has to stop. Period. People talk about more restrictive voting laws being a grave threat to democracy, but if the politicians are being bought and paid for legally, what does that vote matter, anyway?

    Besides, being caught on one side or another of these hot-button political issues is a losing proposition for the companies who get caught up in this nonsense.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Your larger point isn’t wrong, but I’d distinguish between campaign contributions and lobbying spending. The first is exactly what you say. The second is just a more direct and narrowly targeted way of advertising the company’s views; the money doesn’t go to the officials. Based on our experience in Washington I think lobbyist disclosure works pretty well for making lobbying spending transparent; campaign contributions are the much bigger problem.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      I endorse the above.

      If corporations, individuals or even unions are so supportive of the democratic system, then let them make their (deductible) contributions to a fund that then spread the money to candidates/parties based on their percentage of the vote.

      They could still publicly support whichever candidate they chose. They would just not be able to use funds to ‘influence’ candidates.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    Tim,
    you’re traitor and insurrectionist

    “In 2001, House Democrats challenged the certification of electoral votes for then-Texas Gov. George W. Bush, a Republican..”

    “in 2017, when then-Vice President Joe Biden oversaw certification of the electoral votes that handed the presidency to Donald Trump. House Democrats challenged the electoral slate”

    “in 2005 was the only instance in recent years in which both a senator and a House member signed a formal objection to an electoral slate. Then-Rep. Stephanie Tubbs Jones, D-Ohio, and then-Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., together challenged Bush’s victory in Ohio on grounds of alleged voter irregularities”

    • 0 avatar
      Old_WRX

      slavuta,

      You just don’t understand. This is the righteous (the democrats) complaining about the devil’s spawn (the republicans). When democrats complain about republicans its called “truth.” When republicans complain against democrats it’s called “misinformation”, “conspiracy theory” or “distraction”. Stick around and I’ll learn you some more ’bout what ‘Merkin freedom is about;-)

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        Old_WRX
        My brother said this best – we’re the “lucky” ones. We lived through fall of one empire and now living through fall of another one. If Merkins don’t want to learn it from experience of others, they will feel it on their skin.

        • 0 avatar
          Old_WRX

          “If Merkins don’t want to learn it from experience of others, they will feel it on their skin.”

          Sad, but true. And, won’t they squawk then: “But, we’re a free people!” Of course, that squawking won’t last long;-) ‘Merka has been quite visibly heading this way for decades, but the average ‘Merkin doesn’t know what they are looking at.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            Well, if the president says “no constitutional amendment is absolute”. I wonder, is he talking about 19th amendment?
            I have no doubt Americans will swallow anything at this point. Silence of the lambs is complete. Not far that day when we are going to cut that wall to swing into Mexico.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    “..who voted against certifying the election should be professionally punished for attempting to undermine our democracy..”

    Tim,

    word “democracy” or any of it derivatives are not listed in US Constitution or any of the Amendments even once. Then why talk about it. America supposed to be a free state of law and order. Democracy is a road to oppression and tyranny. But in Canada, it’s ok.

    • 0 avatar
      JD-Shifty

      only in states where trump lost of course. derrp

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      This is the worst sort of Putinite nonsense. America started life as an unruly mob of property owners that wanted something pretty akin to a direct democracy, just with landholders as the only voters. Their experiences with that led them to add a layer or two in the 1789 Constitution, but the point was always popular representation. We had a long way to go at that point–to our everlasting shame, it took another 76 years to abolish slavery and give everyone the vote, and then nearly a century after that to actually enforce those things–but the idea that America’s founding was about “law and order” is risible. If that had been the case we’d be in the Commonwealth, with a 94-year-old lady who lives overseas as our head of state.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        No government or state will survive without law and order. Strict adherence to laws is exactly what made America so attractive.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          LOL. I can tell the history classes you took in high school were not American history.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          LOL…yes, because America has always been a “law and order” kind of place…you know, the sort of place that just shuts up and pays the tea tax. Not the sort of place that tosses all the tea into the harbor at the mere mention of such.

          Dal is right here, being suspoect of authority isn’t some new threat to America. It is and has always been a defining trait of Americans.

          Perhaps you are confusing us with your Soviet history.

          • 0 avatar
            Old_WRX

            “being suspoect of authority isn’t some new threat to America. It is and has always been a defining trait of Americans.”

            Except now we have people clamoring that the people suspicious of the results of the 2020 potus election should be “professionally punished.” Which implies that questioning authority is tantamount to treason.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Their punishment is being wrong and being mocked, unless they took their doubt to the extent of breaking and entering into the Capitol and committing crimes there, in which case they will be prosecuted for those crimes, not for their wrong beliefs about the election.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            Art, who is confused here? “because America..” Sorry, there wasn’t any America when tea fell into the harbor.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Nonsense Slavuta. Those people would go on to fight the British and found the United States. I think the very people that kicked off the revolution that resulted in this nation’s founding deserve to be identified as Americans. Unlike you.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            It is like calling Italians descendants of Romans, which they are not. I told you, you’re confused. You are also confused on who is American and who is not. You do call American to Boston Tea Party people. But some of the signers of Declaration of Independence and the Constitution were born outside of N.America. While for today, you imply that someone not born in US is not an American. BS, soldier. You need medication. I am more American that all the locally born traitors you see every day. The ones who turn their back on the American flag from the podium. I went to Princeton NJ recently. BLM signs and rainbow flags everywhere. Any American flags? Not so much. Is Joe Biden an American? He said that Constitutional Amendments don’t mean what they mean. You all are traitors. George Washington risked his life for nothing.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @oldwrx:

            “Except now we have people clamoring that the people suspicious of the results of the 2020 potus election should be “professionally punished.””

            More hyperbole from you…no, no one is saying people who were suspicious of the election should be punished. They’re saying the people who were suspicious enough to start a riot at the U.S. Capitol to overturn said election, and the people who egged them on and continued to support them even after the riot, should be punished.

            But you knew that.

            Stop with the self-victimization already.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Wrong again Slavuta. Quick question though is someone who turns away from the flag less American than say, someone who “ate soup from the same bowl and fought shoulder to shoulder with the Taliban” as you claim to have done?

            That and your constant drumbeat of all things Russian and Soviet being great and core American principals like distrust of authority ruffling your feathers are why I look at your claims of being a great American with skepticism. I don’t think you know what it means.

            I don’t care where you are born. You can be born anywhere and become an American. Heck Billy freaking Idol is an American now. He incidentally just sang [email protected]$$ 80’s anthems…he never fought or dined with the Taliban.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            Funny is, Art,

            1. you’re not listening.
            2. Taliban is an American invention. Bin Laden, Al-qaeda. Thank great American – Ronald Reagan. Who cares now that Bin Laden, Saddam were our SOBs, right? In today’s America, history starts at the last president’s term.
            3. “things Russian and Soviet being great” – nope. Just not being different enough to say they were too horrible vs other things, including in US.
            4. I think I know what means to be American – being free to chose for myself and not being oppressed , especially oppressed by idiots. Liberty, Freedom – these were American virtues. And anyone who came here with this spirit, is an American. If you come here or born here with desire of gov. taking care of you – this is un-American. In this case America turn into another Sweden. BTW, all over Europe people seem tired of extreme leftism and right parties are winning on many levels. And America as usual, lagging decades behind. People are tired and Darwinism is not going to be stopped.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Ah Slavuta, you can’t have your cake and eat it too. You claim that those throwing tea into the harbor and signing the decleration of independance weren’t Americans because no America existed yet.

            In that case, the US never funded the Taliban…we funded the Mujahadeen. This was an organization that many members of would later go on to form the Taliban government. So by your own logic we couldn’t have been funding the Taliban…it didn’t exist yet to cook soup for you.

            Either way, those actions helped topple the Soviet Union so I’ll own them as at the end of the day the world is a better place.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            Nope 1 – “weren’t Americans because no America existed yet” – I said they were not born in America.

            Nope 2 – “those actions helped topple the Soviet Union ” – this is a common myth that USSR was toppled in Afghanistan. Did you read the link I sent you earlier about why USSR left. Long story short, Gorbachev and Reagan agreed that US will not go into Afghanistan and Soviets leave. Moreover, the pull out nearly did not happen. At least not in the timeframe it was done. Bottom line, Gorby wanted to leave all along but kept going every time. How is that “toppled”? He wanted US to give guarantees of neutrality.
            May be you can also read this , do me a favor. You will learn a lot about what caused 9-11
            https://nsarchive.gwu.edu/briefing-book/afghanistan-russia-programs/2019-02-27/soviet-withdrawal-afghanistan-1989

    • 0 avatar
      Astigmatism

      “Democracy is a road to oppression and tyranny.”

      Thank God you’ll never have to live under it.

  • avatar
    Lemmiwinks

    As fun as it is to watch Trumpy snowflakes get triggered, this is the exact type of thing I was concerned about when y’all announced the more-opinionated changes coming to this site.

    It’s annoying enough when Posky runs his mouth, and this is just as bad.

    Please, make it stop.

    • 0 avatar
      Tim Healey

      Not all of the additional opinion will be political. But politics are unavoidable when covering cars.

      As I told another commenter: “We — as in all of TTAC, not just me — get political sometimes. But always, whether it’s a news story or a rant, there is SOME connection to cars.

      I get the desire to escape our toxic politics by reading about Broncos and Mustangs. I do. But politics and the auto industry are inextricably linked, and we’d be shirking our duty to be honest about the industry if we were too afraid to cover politics because it might alienate readers.”

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        No, plenty of sites do just fine at avoiding it. Sometimes I watch old Motor week episodes as well and I don’t notice a ton of Reagan jokes in there.

        Don’t try to push it off…Politics permeate this site because you keep writing politcal articles.

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    I am not going to read the comments. I understand that this is a opinion piece. I understand it has some automotive news in it however I just dont understand why this was needed here. If you are hurting for visits I come her 5-7 times a day and are willing to click on ads if needed. But this is not what I need.

    • 0 avatar
      Tim Healey

      As I told another commenter — “We — as in all of TTAC, not just me — get political sometimes. But always, whether it’s a news story or a rant, there is SOME connection to cars.

      I get the desire to escape our toxic politics by reading about Broncos and Mustangs. I do. But politics and the auto industry are inextricably linked, and we’d be shirking our duty to be honest about the industry if we were too afraid to cover politics because it might alienate readers.”

      I’d add that while we love the clicks, you can also skip the articles that don’t interest you. We cater to varied interests.

  • avatar
    4onthefloor

    Mr Posky: You are a wise man to stay out of the fray.
    Mr. Healy: you are in my opinion not only an idiot, but a liar. If you worked for me, you would have been fired the second your post hit the internet, and escorted from the building, with whatever crap you have in your desk mailed to you.

    This is the reason I would never hire a democrat, and got rid of the ones that used to work for me. I have disassociated myself from all democrats in my life, supposed friends and relatives alike, and I have to say that my life has improved immensely, and stress levels decreased dramatically. For as much as you hate Trump, he is still living in your head, and has added a second floor addition.
    I have been with this site since the beginning, and have seen many things, but this is the dumbest of all. You are in my opinion, mentally ill Mr Healy, as I find the majority of democrats the be. The funny thing is, a long time ago, I used to be a democrat, back when they had reasonable ideas, and actually wanted to help people. Now all they care about is power, no matter the cost, or who they destroy.
    You are on the crazy train Mr. Healy, and it’s about to go off a cliff. Since most democrats don’t listen to reason, I don’t feel the need to point out all the ways your post is total BS, and I will leave you with some words of wisdom from one of the few sports figures that has any brains at all: “Republicans buy sneakers too”. TTAC deathwatch starts now. Perhaps you can rename this site “ Partisan democrats opinions on cars” and make a go of it, but I don’t give you a snowballs chance in hades of making it. Sad really, but this site has been spiraling for quite a while, so it won’t be a surprise. Good bye, and good luck.

  • avatar
    tylanner

    theTRUTHaboutcars

    I’d say this is pretty applicable…

  • avatar
    Rich Fitzwell

    Let’s ask Al Gore about stolen elections in the Bush controlled, hanging chad state of Florida.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      There was not a single count that had Mr Gore winning Florida, which is why the US Supreme Court put an end to the counting.

      But to his credit, Gore finally took it like a man, even announcing his own loss in his role as president of the Senate.

      Trump’s loss was deep and wide, yet somehow people believe a massive conspiracy took place in every corner of the country to make it only seem that way. A statesman would have let it go in November, or December at the latest.

  • avatar
    4onthefloor

    I guess you missed the part where I said “ if you worked for me “ as nowhere in my post did I say that your management should come into your house and remove you, nor did I say that YOUR management should fire you or remove you. We work in an actual building, and have found from past experience that allowing people to work from home lowered their productivity, by 50% and prevented interaction with fellow employees that fostered careless mistakes. You have the reading part right, it’s the comprehension part you’re a little light on. :). Don’t worry, with a little luck, when you grow up you’ll understand. Please don’t mistake a difference of opinion for dislike. I was younger too once, and made many mistakes, but alienating customers was not one of them. Good luck, and I mean that!

  • avatar
    4onthefloor

    I guess you missed the part where I said “ if you worked for me “ as nowhere in my post did I say that your management should come into your house and remove you, nor did I say that YOUR management should fire you or remove you. We work in an actual building, and have found from past experience that allowing people to work from home lowered their productivity, by 50% and prevented interaction with fellow employees that fostered careless mistakes. You have the reading part right, it’s the comprehension part you’re a little light on. :). Don’t worry, with a little luck, when you grow up you’ll understand. Please don’t mistake a difference of opinion for dislike. I was younger too once, and made many mistakes, but alienating customers was not one of them. Good luck, and I mean that!

  • avatar
    4onthefloor

    “Hate to break it to you, but you (paying $0 for this site and all) aren’t VerticalScope’s customer.”

    So clicks belong to a political party now? Interesting.

    “you’re probably the same old wizened fox news zombie who complains no one will work for you for min wage”

    I start my employees at $50 an hour, and people are knocking the door down to work here, however, it requires a specialized skill set that I doubt you have, and even if you do, I don’t hire democrats because I found most of them to be whiners, fools and disrupters. Like most democrats, you spray out random thoughts without a clue about what you’re talking about. Typical of your ilk.

    • 0 avatar
      JD-Shifty

      right wing trump supporters live a rich online fantasy life. case in point. Oh yeah don’t forget about Hunter’s laptop

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      What did I say about a political party? You complained that Tim was alienating customers, and I reminded you that you are not Tim’s customer. The advertisers are. If they are OK with Tim and Matt engaging in a sort of “Crossfire” with left- and right-leaning posts, then Tim isn’t going to care a whit whether you feel alienated or not.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        That’s the same argument Baruth used about new car dealers. Here’s the thing, if you are the manufacturer and produce a product the customers of your customers do not like or will not purchase, it affects *your* customers.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          In this case, I’d assume Tim’s goal is to expand readership and views for his advertisers. Judging by the length of time the discussion has carried on and the number of comments, it’s working.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            You remember the days of 300+ comments in a piece, if that’s the goal its a pyrrhic victory IMO. Back in the day percentage wise I’d wager the amount more politically oriented may be 33% perhaps 50% at best in most articles which had a bent. This one its likely much higher on a percentage basis and they will likely be misled by the (so far) 159 posts – likely the most commented article in months if not the past two or three years.

            The other thing to remember is how polarized the US has become, pandering to one side’s customers will result in losing others. Now if they have data suggesting the net amount is a gain, it would make business sense but data can also be contradictory. Again, I argue it becomes a pyrrhic victory. Oh we added 8% new unique users, great. How many long time users did you lose and how much of that 8% is around in six months?

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            I bet if TTAC published a piece titled “The Hellcat’s America: Love It or Leave It” you would get those 300 comments easily. Matt, what are you waiting for?

            People may hate themselves after arguing about politics on the internet but they’re sure eager to do it, self included.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “The other thing to remember is how polarized the US has become, pandering to one side’s customers will result in losing others”
            That’s more of an issue on the left or right fringe. Most sit in the middle either slightly left or slightly right of centre. A shift to one extreme or the other is unlikely.
            If a dude claiming to fire democrats and has expunged all democrats from his life were to be alienated and leave TTAC, how many who lean left would take notice and become a reader?

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Fun fact. We wrote about this on May 9.

    We started talking to Axios about a media partnership in the third week of May.

    We are not pleased.

  • avatar
    Good ole dayz

    It’s hard to know where to start, Mr. Healey is sooo wrong on so many points.

    1) The evidence of a plot to steal the election was becoming evident before the election, and there is now so much evidence it arguably amounts to incontrovertible (and its still coming);

    2) That includes involvement of the CCP (the Chinese Communist Party);

    3) That there was a “free and fair election” and that Joe Biden won is itself the BIG LIE;

    4) The events of January 6th was not an insurrection – I was a witness (albeit not inside the building). I saw Antifa (and/or similar) agitators — and there’s increasingly plausible information that many of those were FBI operatives;

    5) I will be happy to provide links to all of the above (not sure if TTAC allows posting of links in comments). I’m perfectly comfortable with people reviewing information from non-“mainstream” media and drawing their own conclusions;

    6) Speaking of “mainstream media” (whose talking points Mr. Healey piously regurgitates), note that this same media is notorious for promulgating BIG LIES (here’s a trip down memory lane to refresh memories):

    Trump colluded with the Russians, and Mueller is going to nail him on that;

    The Steele dossier is genuine (not paid for by the Hillary Clinton campaign via money laundered through the Perkins Coie law firm;

    CO2 is a pollutant and “climate change” presents and existential threat to mankind, and life on earth in general (believers in this displaying all the characteristics of a religious cult);

    Hunter Biden’s laptop (and the contents thereof) is “Russian disinformation”;

    Covid-19 originated in a Wuhan wet market and to suggest that it originated in the Wuhan lab is racist;

    Masks are effective in protecting against Covid-19;

    Hydroxychloroquine is recommended by President Trump – therefore it is not effective against Covid-19, and may kill you if you take it. Meanwhile …

    The “vaccine” (actually mRNA modification) which has not been approved by the FDA, just authorized for “emergency use,” must be taken by all, including youth who are not at risk from Covid — yet you may still get Covid afterwards;

    The lockdowns etc. are necessary even thought the “virus” has in excess of a ninety-nine percent recovery rate, and if eminently treatable with hydroxychloroquine and ivermectin.

    Need I go on?

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      And here is the video of ANTIFA crashing into the Capitol building
      https://twitter.com/SicarioScott/status/1402306704373649409

      • 0 avatar
        Good ole dayz

        Yep, I’ve seen that, and other material. Since it appears that TTAC will allow links in posts, here’s a sampling:

        https://americanmind.org/essays/the-coming-coup/

        https://hereistheevidence.com

        https://home.frankspeech.com/content/mike-lindells-absolute-series

        https://moshimalaya.com/

        https://rumble.com/vdp7df-share-unmasked-have-we-uncovered-the-truth-about-the-2020-election.html

        https://navarroreport.com/

        TIME Magazine (effectively an after-action report): https://time.com/5936036/secret-2020-election-campaign/

        https://bigleaguepolitics.com/john-podesta-refused-to-concede-in-democratic-election-wargame-while-roleplaying-as-joe-biden/

        https://www.revolver.news/2020/08/george-kent-never-trump-state-department/

        https://www.revolver.news/2020/09/transition-integrity-project-is-this-soros-linked-group-plotting-a-color-revolution-against-president-trump/

        https://www.revolver.news/2020/09/meet-norm-eisen-legal-hatchet-man-and-central-operative-in-the-color-revolution-against-president-trump/

        https://thenationalpulse.com/news/transition-integrity-project-linked-to-obama-lawyers-hunter-biden/

      • 0 avatar
        Old_WRX

        And, let’s not forget there were videos of the police opening the barriers and letting the crowd into the capitol.

  • avatar
    jimmyy

    The BIG LIE:

    “There is no voter fraud.”

    • 0 avatar
      JD-Shifty

      antifa is a boogeyman made up to distract dummies.

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      Jimmyy – 61 cases brought up. 61 cases dismissed for lack of evidence. The big lie is just that: A lie to undermine democracy. And to his credit, it is working. We are awash in legislation making it harder for the “wrong” people to vote. America is in grave danger. Biden bought some time but the fascists – like those who stormed the capital, and even some who work there like Nut Job Greene” have not gone away.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Oh noooes…people have to show an ID and bring trheir own water to vote. Whaever is the world coming to?

        Why is it that it is expected that one shows an ID to buy a 6 pack of Nattys and a pack of Marlboro Reds, but to vote? Dats Racist.

      • 0 avatar
        jimmyy

        Even a bigger lie pumped by the Dems and the MSM:

        “61 cases brought up. 61 cases dismissed for lack of evidence.”

      • 0 avatar
        Old_WRX

        golden2husky,

        Nazi’s were socialists (National Socialist German Workers’ Party) and hence leftists. That’s not to say that there aren’t any scary people on the right. There are far right who want to make everyone live according to there version of what God wants (e.g., Georgia’s anti-sodomy law). But, calling far rights “Nazis” just doesn’t work.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          @oldwrx:

          Nazis were “socialist” because they had “socialist” in the name of their party? LOL..okey dokey. I guess the USSR was a republic, just like we are, right? I mean, it’s right there in their name…you know, “Union of Soviet Socialist Republics.”

          Nazism was nothing more than a dictatorship with a palatable label. Ditto for the USSR, and ditto for the Peoples’ Republic of China today.

          But you knew that. You just wanted to pwn the idea of socialism.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            Republic Definition

            1. government having a chief of state who is not a monarch and who in modern times is usually a president

            2. a political unit (such as a nation) having such a form of government

            3. a government in which supreme power resides in a body of citizens entitled to vote and is exercised by elected officers and representatives responsible to them and governing according to law

            USSR checks all 3. Although it was a union of Republics. The only catch was, it had a 1 party system. And often, the party had only 1 candidate to vote for.

            Moreover USSR in 1920es was ruled by Bolsheviks, then by Dictator Stalin who took all powers. Then by Khrushchev who was 75% dictator but soft one. Soft enough that he was easily removed and not executed after. With era of Brezhnev USSR was ruled by committee and Secretary General was its representative. He was not single-handedly ruling the country, he wasn’t there for life.

            USSR Constitution

            Chapter 1. The Political System

            Article 1. The Union of Soviet Socialist Republics is a socialist state of the whole people, expressing the will and interests of the workers, peasants, and intelligentsia, the working people of all the nations and nationalities of the country.

            Article 2. All power in the USSR belongs to the people. The people exercise state power through Councils of People’s Deputies, which constitute the political foundation of the USSR. All other state bodies are under the control of, and accountable to, the Councils of People’s Deputies.

            Article 72. Each Union Republic shall retain the right freely to secede from the USSR.

            https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Constitution_of_the_Soviet_Union_(1977,_Unamended)

            Single party, high corruption, no private enterprise – that was the
            issue. Chinese studied USSR very hard, not to repeat mistakes.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          He does not understand. May be they weren’t truly left but socialist – for sure. How about all the government projects, no unemployment, all people – to the jobs!! VW – Nazi-created company. The children joined all sorts of social organizations.
          A little off topic, check this

          “[Nazis] encouraged supporters to take to the streets to harass and assault Nazi opposition. It was a winning tactic because few Germans dared oppose armed mobs of brownshirts who were never arrested or prosecuted for their assaults on people or property.

          Sound familiar? Remember Black Lives Matter and Antifa in places like Minneapolis, Seattle, Portland, Chicago, and New York City? They are still burning and looting.”

          And sounds like Kamala, Maxine and Ilhan, and Don Lemon ^^ – “who said protests must peaceful?”, “they are not going to stop”

          This is it, we’re Nazis

  • avatar
    don333

    Wow. This is deeply pitiful. In so many ways. I’ll try to detail…
    1. I subscribed my feed to this site to gain insights to automobiles, not hear your thoughts on politics, WHATEVER they might be.
    2. I’m new to Truth About Cars, but this statement tells me you inject your politics fairly regularly: “You know by now that your author leans left politically.” Again, why do they know that? This is a website about CARS, not politics. The problem with lefties is they are SO obsessed with politics, it infects, and destroys, EVERYTHING THEY TOUCH. Ya can’t even talk about cars without talking politics. You are a member of a cult, dude. Face it. Your brain is consumed by your cult.
    3. Your whole goal is to intimidate anyone from donating to Republicans. Democrats and left have been doing that for decades. It’s why we now — thanks you to — are opposed to “disclosure.” Because you use that to attack donors. It’s pitiful and despicable.
    4. It’s quite reasonable for Toyota to look at the whole collection of what a politician stands for, not your one-issue laser-focus. That’s what mature, normal, psychologically healthy people do.
    5. A reasonable case can be made that it was legal to want to DELAY the certification of the vote until further investigations were completed. I don’t think it was wise or good for America, but it’s hardly the disaster for humanity you think it was.
    6. Hillary has been saying she won the 2016 election for four years. Have you tried to wage any campaigns to “cancel” anyone who donated to her?

    I have 20 other publications I follow, and I won’t waste anymore time on this one.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    Someone call the Wall Street Journal…the Poors are explaining politics again.

  • avatar
    Prado

    TTAC is now big joke. Keep your politics to yourself. You are the worst Healy. Been on this site since Farago. Bye forever.

  • avatar
    Prado

    TTAC is now a big joke. Keep your politics to yourself. You are the worst Healy. Been on this site since Farago. Bye forever.

  • avatar
    Polka King

    Alls I know is that every good thing that happened in those four years came from Mr. Trump and every bad thing that happened came from his opponents.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      Polka King: Okay, so exactly what did he do? Put up a fake border wall the Mexicans quickly cut holes in with a sawzall and a Diablo blade? Took credit for a vaccine platform that had already been under development for 20+ years? How are those Supreme COurt picks working out? Where was the new health care plan he kept promising? He was too lazy to actually get any legislation passed and instead used executive orders that were quickly overturned. He was good at running up the deficit while at the same time somehow claiming to be a conservative. He had almost zero work ethic and spent way too much time on the golf course.

      He was a crooked New York real estate developer that failed at that and only managed to succeed by becoming a game show host based on a lie. It was all fakery, smoke, and mirrors. He was also stupid at being a crook and his criminal enterprise is about to come down. There’s plenty that will be coming out. You’ll see.

  • avatar
    VWGolfGuy

    And I’m sure Toyota and other auto makers made contributions to the reps/senators that denied reality on Trumps 2016 win with a four year narrative of Russian collusion. Trumps out, Biden is in, auto makers play both sides, this is a nothing event. Let go of the TDS.

  • avatar
    rvakenya

    $55k to 37 people counts as supporting them? You are an A$$ and this site is a rag. You can’t write anything interesting about cars and TheDrive.com has better articles. Goodbye forever. Trump 2024!

  • avatar
    wolfwagen

    When did TTAC become CNN?
    WTH Tim are you now getting paid by the comment? OK I’ll play

    Yes, politics does affect autos and the auto business in the form of legislation, regulations, tax breaks, etc. This story not so much. Does this story directly impact anything in the automotive world? NO. FULL STOP. DO NOT PUBLISH!

    Who cares if Toyota gave $55K to 37 Republicans? I bet they gave money to Democrats too. What we should all be concerned about is the majority of the “free press” that gives substantially more money to one political party than the other and then disseminates their talking points almost verbatim. The purpose of the news was to inform people of what is going on IMPARTIALLY & TRUTHFULLY (i.e Both sides of the story) and now that is dead – it has been for about 20-30 years.

    I come to TTAC to forget about politics and enjoy my non-work passion: All things automotive. To my fellow commentators shame on you (and me) for giving Mr Healy any credence or validation to this story and his opinion on a story that DOES NOT DIRECTLY IMPACT THE AUTOMOTIVE WORLD!!!

    Tim if you want to be a whiny political Bitch go over to FOX or CNN.

  • avatar
    kosmo

    Thanks Tim!

    One less site to check in on every morning.

    I’ll get both my politics and car news elsewhere, again.

  • avatar
    Rocket

    Ahh, the political op ed … The only guaranteed way for an automotive site to piss off and/or offend half of its audience. Risk for clicks.

  • avatar
    chris724

    I care about this as much as you care about Antifa. Burn down DC for all I care.

  • avatar
    kkop

    This is TTAC now:

    uncritical, exited posts about Dakar, a formerly great race that is now being held in a country where gay people face the death penalty, which is ruled by a despot who is actively spreading his message of hate worldwide.

    And excited, critical posts about campaign funding of politicians in the USA.

    So brave.

  • avatar
    4onthefloor

    My mother died 20 years ago. Any more smart ideas bright boy? Meanwhile your unemployment is running out and you’ll have to go back to work soon. I’m sorry that your clothes will once again smell like like fry grease when you get home, but perhaps you should have made better life choices.

  • avatar
    KenyG

    Wow. I’ve been reading TTAC for a very long time. I live in PA and my Congress critter gets donations from the sugar industry, we’re not growing sugar in PA.

    I don’t come hear for political rants. I could care less. Bookmark removed. Goodbye.

  • avatar
    JD-Shifty

    No one not even trump’s base really believes he won. They’re just spoiled children that didn’t get the toy they wanted.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    What’s the difference between a right-wing conspiracy theory and the truth?

    About two months.

  • avatar
    Pete Zaitcev

    “To be clear, this isn’t a partisan position that I am taking.”

    A journalist lies like he breathes. News at 11!

    “EVERYONE who voted against certification was working to undermine our democracy.”

    I think this pitiful excuse for a journalist is trying to reboot TTAC into a different kind of publication.

    “It’s about reality, which isn’t up for debate.”

    The reality that is not up for debate is that the spirit of Robert Farrago has left the building and it’s time for us all to remove this bookmark and move on.

    • 0 avatar
      Old_WRX

      Pete Zaitcev,

      “I think this pitiful excuse for a journalist is trying to reboot TTAC into a different kind of publication.”

      Maybe the name should be changed to, “The Pravda About Cars.”

  • avatar
    JD-Shifty

    suits me just fine if every person here who listens to tucker or newsmax leaves. Of course seeing how 97 percent of the new covid deaths are the unvaccinated I may be able to just wait

  • avatar
    ErickKS

    Two types of unacceptable things with our author’s conduct here:

    1) Attacking donations to parties. People, etc., should be free to do so without having their livelihoods destroyed, etc. It’s actual democracy.

    2) Making it clear HERE, on a *CAR SITE*, that you, our author, support the party that wants ANYTHING BUT for Americans to get along. The party that uses identity politics to destroy the fabric of society at every turn.

    TTAC was nice at one point, but I may never know if it becomes so again. Deleting bookmarks, and, I’m outta here.

    • 0 avatar
      Old_WRX

      ErickKS,

      You forgot to mention that he is supporting the party that wants to take away our ICE cars. Actually, they probably want to take away all our cars.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Right, here’s the Democrats’ master plan:
        1) Take away everyone’s cars.
        2) Endless re-election success!!!!

        No one’s car is getting taken away. Get a grip.

        • 0 avatar
          Old_WRX

          FreedMike,

          “Endless re-election success!!!!”

          Another Uncle Joe had this to say about elections: “It’s not the people who vote that count, it’s the people who count the votes.” Obviously uncle Joe B. would agree with that.

  • avatar

    So TTAC “journalist” gone woke. What a surprise but I do not care. But I insist that future elections in USA have to be monitored by international observers and not only from western countries. I do not trust the Church of Woke and elections controlled by Church.

    • 0 avatar
      JD-Shifty

      “woke” definition: anyone who disagrees with trump or fox and friends

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        Return to your cubicle NOW. Your boss Jenn Psaki is waiting

        • 0 avatar
          Old_WRX

          I still can’t get over how pathetic Psaki is compared with McEnany. I may not have always agreed with McEnany, but that woman was blindingly competent as press secretary. The snake pit of leftist “journalists” was constantly trying to mess her up, but they couldn’t do it. LOL

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            Old_WRX,

            you know what it comes down to.. I was listening to the interview with one Swiss journalist, who was in his early years translating for Gorbachev, Yeltsin, and his prime minister Chernomyrdin. And the talk was exactly about competency in politics. So he told how in Switzerland they have 1000 people study political science and 25 people study computer science at the same time. Then, how these girls start working for government and become “Psakis”. And then he talked how Euro politicians appoint someone without a clue, then these people meet with people from Russia and China, like Chernomyrdin, who completed industrial and economic education, worked up from laborer and to director of the plant. Became founder of Gazprom, then Prime Minister. And this journo say, “then these girls or young women without a clue must discuss issues with these giants”.

            I have to say, politics is like sport. Why German team is so successful over the years? – German coaches are not changing every 4 years like many other teams. Germany had 9 Chancellors why US -14 presidents after WW2. This is about competency and stability.

      • 0 avatar
        Old_WRX

        JD-Shifty,

        ““woke” definition: anyone who disagrees with trump or fox and friends”

        Wow, that’s a really woke definition of “woke.”

  • avatar
    gtem

    Just checking in to see Healey is still using his time at the helm of a tanking website as a sad little soap box. Actually, the real motivation seems to be a last ditch effort to generate clicks/comments (looking at the 100+ comments on this article versus the typical 20ish these days). Equally pathetic.

  • avatar

    Most of Toyotas domestic production is in red states. This is why they gave disproportionately to GOP candidates.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    Way more concerned with failing auto companies getting my money than what profitable ones are doing with their money.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Peak Tim Healey. (When alienating readers, be sure to mock them [and “giggle”?] on their way out.)

    Related:
    https://youtu.be/1y7NGqfZteg

    B&B, we have reached this point of the voyage [approximately]:
    https://youtu.be/rs9w5bgtJC8?t=9450

  • avatar
    johnnyz

    Fake pandemic. Mail in voting. Stolen election.

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