By on June 3, 2021

Ford has announced that it will be introducing a new pickup next week, effectively making this the pre-engagement ring of automotive commitments. Anticipated to be a compact truck priced to contend with tougher times, the model has fittingly been named the Maverick. The title harkens back to the 1970s and the 2-door coupe (later sedan) equipped with a lineup of “Thriftpower” motors that originally had the name emblazoned on the rear deck with a somewhat confusing cattle theme.

While designed in roughly the same spirit as the original, the modern Maverick is a different animal and unlikely to come with the optional Windsor V8 allotted to the coupe. We’ve been told it’s to be produced alongside the smaller Bronco Sport in Mexico and likely share a platform. That means powertrains will probably be limited to 1.5 or 2.0-liter Ecoboost motors with a maximum possible output of 245 horsepower. 

But that should suffice for a pint-sized pickup. It’s more than any non-Syclone version of the Chevy S-10 produced and would undoubtedly be sufficient for the lighter workloads someone would buy the truck for in the first place. Ford also released a teaser video where the truck looks to have a hybrid badge on the back. We’re betting that model would use the 2.5-liter Duratec iVCT gas-electric hybrid that’s found in the current-generation Escape. Though it should be said that absolutely none of this has been confirmed by the manufacturer.

Pricing is a mystery but Ford will absolutely keep the Maverick well below the Bronco Sport’s nearly $27,000 MSRP. It also has to try and avoid stepping on the Ranger’s toes, likely necessitating a price tag as close to $20,000 as it can manage. Blue Oval previously hinted that it wanted to introduce a pickup under $20,000, though we’re not sure how realistic that’s going to be with just every other model seeing a price hike over the last year — including the Bronco Sport.

The official debut happens on June 8th, with Ford hiring Gabrielle Union (who I verified is actually famous after a quick search) to simultaneously present the vehicle on her own Instagram and TikTok channels. The manufacturer will also be broadcasting the event on Hulu and via its existing social media channels. It’s likely to be a cringe festival but we’re genuinely interested in what the pickup is going to offer and hope this heralds in more legitimately small trucks, rather than “midsize” behemoths like the Chevrolet Colorado and Ford’s own Ranger.

 

[Images: Ford Motor Co.]

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100 Comments on “2022 Ford Maverick Debuts Next Week...”


  • avatar
    slavuta

    I never saw a black hipster chick driving a Ford p/u. Racial thing is going into stupidity. Because loser will be Ford. This advertisement hit nobody. A chick on the video will be driving completely different vehicle in real life.

    For the car… Santa Cruz, you’re not alone

    • 0 avatar
      puddleJumper

      I think you’re wrong there, slavuta. According to my TV watching, America is made up of 50% young black female professionals busy pointing out the faults of their clumsy white male underlings.

      • 0 avatar
        FerrariLaFerrariFace

        Wow. Somebody’s a little mad they didn’t put a white guy in a cowboy hat smoking a Marlboro while they played a Bob Seger song, aren’t they?

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          FerrariLaFerrariFace

          I don’t know if cowboy wants 2L engine. Advertising serves one purpose – move your product. For a truck like this, you need to show a purpose. Instead, they show some political activist as per Kyree S. Williams. What did we learn from this ad, that Ford is on the side with DNC, nothing else

          • 0 avatar
            Nick_515

            “Ford is on the side with DNC, nothing else.” UHUH.

            “Will be driving completely different vehicle in real life.” OH YEAH, cause ad models always be driving their personal vehicles /s

            “I totally don’t care who they put in commercials.” CLEARLY (eyeroll).

            Troll farm needs to invest in better quality control. While the foaming at the mouth types don’t bother me, this was a real poor showing.

          • 0 avatar
            turbo_awd

            “What did we learn from this ad, that Ford is on the side with DNC, nothing else”

            Well, at least we know that they are somewhat rational and know how to choose between “maybe a bit too woke” and “batshit crazy”…

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          Man, please don’t put Bob Seger in there…

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      First of all, that “black hipster chick” is Gabrielle Union, who is really rather famous.

      Secondly, thought patterns like this are exactly the problem. For decades, putting White people in advertisements was the default. Minorities (like me) weren’t represented unless it was to make a—usually condescending and negative—statement. It was unheard of to put a minority in an advertisement if you wanted it to appeal to the general public, because we “didn’t belong.” These days, we know better. It’s perfectly acceptable, as it should be, to put a Black person in an ad and it not be a “race” thing. White people are no longer the default choice for advertising, and it makes sense to portray a minority as a normal, everyday American, because that’s what we are. I’m sorry if that offends you.

      As a matter of fact, there’s so little here that would be about race, other than the color of Union’s skin, I’m not sure what you’re on about. It’s not like there’s a Tupac song playing, or a backdrop of urban blight…things you would traditionally see in advertisements that try to be “Black.”

      Third, I’m sure plenty of “hipster chicks”, Black, White or otherwise do drive affordable pickup trucks, and if not, perhaps Ford is looking to curate a new demographic. Often people don’t know what they want until you demonstrate why they should want it…or at least figure out a way to represent them and make them picture themselves with it. That’s Marketing 101.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        I totally don’t care who they put into commercials. Commercials do little to me personally, I look into car data. I just don’t believe this will work at all. And it is nothing but current political bent we have in US. Looking into this woman’s history, I now understand – I was right. She is a political activist and Ford is just lost its head. I remember how Kia called on Steven Tyler – instant hit. No politics here. Bruce Springsteen – total fail. Ford could learn something.

        • 0 avatar
          Lemmiwinks

          “I totally don’t care who they put into commercials.”

          Then why do you keep going on about this?

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            Lemmiwinks

            just like savagegeese said about new Explorer, “I would fire a person who signed on this product”. I would do same for this ad. Simply because my company just wasted money.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “Then why do you keep going on about this?”

            That’s what he gets paid to do…

            Gotta keep the “libtards” fighting against the “MAGA they gotta know their place” types.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          The fact that you assumed this was making some kind of statement purely on the basis of her skin color and then went digging to see if she was political or not…is the problem. Black people can’t just be in commercials without it being “a thing,” evidently.

          The thing about marketing people is they get it right more often than not…especially the sorts of agencies that a large company like Ford would choose. So even if they *are* making a statement, they probably know what they’re doing and are better experts at it than you (who I will assume are not a marketing professional). The fact that it didn’t appeal to you personally doesn’t mean Ford didn’t hit the mark here or doesn’t know what it’s doing.

          And then you actually had the nerve to throw up your arms and say that you don’t even care who they put in commercials, anyway, and that you only care about the specs of the car…even though you dragged up this nonsense.

          If you’re going to be ridiculous, at least be honest with yourself about it.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            “The fact that you assumed this was making some kind of statement purely on the basis of her skin color…”

            This is simply not true! If they had a small business owner carrying a step ladder in the bed of this truck, independently of color, I would say nothing. All I said, I don’t see people like her drive this kind of car. In my hood, she would drive a Lexus

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            While slavuta is having a heart attack over the fact that a commercial features a famous Black actress rather than his imagined pickup demographic, Ford is going to be busy selling every last one of these they can build, most likely to a broadly representative group of buyers.

          • 0 avatar
            dwford

            Commercials are supposed to help you see yourself using the product. I highly doubt having Gabrielle Union pitch the Maverick is going to have even one black woman thinking “that could be me!” and she won’t help the actual buyers of this truck (old white men – sorry) see themselves in the truck either.

            Gabrielle Union is famous, and a capable spokesperson in her other advertising work, but she seems an odd choice here.

            I do get that Ford and it’s marketing team want to expand the market for this truck, but these types of cheap functional vehicles often get pitched at younger buyers, but end up getting bought by older people instead. Think Honda Element, Kia Soul, Scion xB, etc. All marketed at youth, but bought by old people in the end.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            I think the buyer base of this truck will be men, but not old and not especially white. Many of the target buyers will enjoy looking at Gabrielle Union, which is reason enough to feature her (remember Kate Walsh in the Mercury ads, or for that matter Matthew McConaughey in the Lincon ones?).

        • 0 avatar
          FerrariLaFerrariFace

          “I totally don’t care who they put into commercials.”

          Clearly you do… since you’re the one who brought it up.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            “Clearly you do… since you’re the one who brought it up”

            The only think that I brought up is my opinion that this commercial hits milk far away from bulleye. Wrong demographics. I actually was right when latest Mazda3 came out, I said, in the comments on this site – “there is no buyer for it”. How did they do? yep.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            Actually, Ford might be on to something:

            https://southernstylesandsteeds.com/5-black-female-farmers-feeding-rural-america/

            https://www.postandcourier.com/food/group-of-black-women-farmers-in-columbia-targets-agricultural-disparities-food-inequities/article_15cd2360-e973-11ea-b1bf-e703143372b5.html

            https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/jul/31/living-off-the-land-the-new-sisterhood-of-black-female-homesteaders

            https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2018/11/10/663529543/farming-while-black-a-guide-to-finding-power-and-dignity-through-food

            https://blackfarmersnetwork.com/female-farmer-helps-create-hemp-history-in-south-georgia/

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Commercials are supposed to make you feels safe and comfortable about a product.

            Obviously, the hashtag “triggered” types whining about a woman of colour in the commercial aren’t the target demographic.

            The #triggered whiners in effect are an encouragement to the target demographic to buy this vehicle.

            I’m of the belief that the target demographic are going to be people who’d traditionally buy a small CUV which are mostly women.

      • 0 avatar
        DaveTheBraveEh

        There hasn’t been an “affordable pickup truck” for anyone to drive since the Ford stopped making the old Ranger in 2011.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Never heard of her but this (indy?) film she starred in sounds very intriguing.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neo_Ned

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        Kyree, I agree with you 100%. However as we have noted ‘Slavuta’ appears to be multiple people and/or personalities. The discrepancy in writing style, syntax, and claimed experiences are the primary indicators of this.

      • 0 avatar
        Mike A

        Of course being white was the default Kree, even now the large majority of people are white. So not a shocker that white people are in the adverts. Plus given all the complaining about wealth inequality (or equity as we now must say!) the large majority of buyers will be white.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @Mike A – it won’t be too long and whites will no longer be the majority in the USA or Canada. Roughly 25 years for USA and 12 years in Canada.

    • 0 avatar
      Veeg

      So it’s liberal because it’s not a white man?

      I bet you’d be fine with Candace Owens.

    • 0 avatar
      dwford

      An odd choice, to be sure. But marketers gotta market, and they have fantasies of the Maverick being bought by young urban/suburban professionals, when in reality the truck is pretty much catnip to retired white men and Outback lesbians.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        …or just homeowners in general.

      • 0 avatar
        Lemmiwinks

        dwford

        You may very well be right. I know my late-septuagenarian father has loved tiny stripper pickups for eternity. If he wasn’t so obsessed with buying used, he might be first in line for this.

        I also know a lot of inner-city handy-folks of all ages and stripes who would jump at a nice small pickup as an alternative to a small van.

        If I may: The entire Scion lineup was geared toward the youthful, potential Toyota owner. The JDM-ish designs were as bleeding-edge as US “entry-level” bean counters could allow. But a buttload of boomers bought them too. Way more than any enthusiast, journalist, or Toyota exec expected.

        My point is: The “(sub)compact” pickup has been largely absent from the US market for approximately 30 years. Frontier and Raider exist(ed), but neither were actually attended to in over two decades. So while Nissan’s latest forthcoming offering looks like more of the same, we have zero idea what a genuine new player in the US market could actually do to the demographic spectrum if they design it just so.

        And I have zero idea whether that supports your thoughts on the matter or mine! : )

        Have a great night.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          There is an old saying in the automotive business which is you can sell an old person a young person’s car, but you can’t sell a young person an old person’s car. So yeah always aim your marketing at the younger demographic.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @dwford – I love the catnip metaphor.

        I doubt old white guys would gravitate to a unibody front drive turbo 4 banger.

  • avatar
    Rick T.

    Wonder how much the Venn diagrams of the potential buyers and the people who know who that is are overlap?

  • avatar
    J_Vandal

    I still don’t get why they didn’t bring back the Courier name, but what do folks like us know about Ford history? With the Frontier going upmarket, I’m sure we’ll be seeing more of these working the pool cleaner/lawn mower transport than anything else.

  • avatar
    phreshone

    Will they give the 2.0T a 3500 lb tow rating…
    Will they bring out a class single cab + long bed…

    Will this finally force Dodge to bring back the Rampage…

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    When we go to Mexico there are these compact Chevy pickup trucks that look like baby El Caminos.

    I always think to myself as a suburban dweller with a GMT900 that this would be a far more ideal solution for “honey I need dirt for the garden” and general runabout than a 19′ long Suburban based truck.

    Ya, doubt Americans would buy it and I’m sure there are legit reasons they aren’t here.

    When we were in Namibia last year had an Opel pick up IIRC and we enjoyed it. It was kind of gutless, but otherwise ideal for our needs within Windhoek and the edges of town.

  • avatar
    redapple

    ” and hope this heralds in more legitimately small trucks, rather than “midsize” behemoths like the Chevrolet Colorado and Ford’s own Ranger. ”

    YESSSSSSSSSSSS !

  • avatar
    JMII

    “For the car… Santa Cruz, you’re not alone”

    As someone who has switched from potential Ranger buyer into pretty much going to get a Santa Cruz I am still interested to see what Ford is offering here.

    However if all the rumors are true this return to a more normal sized (aka mini-truck) is likely too under powered for my use case (towing). They clearly must keep the Maverick slotted below the Ranger in terms of price and capability.

    I could careless who the pitch person is, just give us the facts and figures along with some decent hi-res videos of all the features and design characteristics. Launching on social media platforms must have the ad executives at the TV networks a bit miffed. However the younger generation learns via TikTok and the ‘gram so that is apparently the target market. Obvious boomers and brodozers don’t care about this toy truck other to laugh at it.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “Obvious boomers and brodozers don’t care about this toy truck other to laugh at it.”

      That’s why I’m surprised Ford went so traditional with the styling a proportions.
      I personally like the Santa Cruz more right now. My biggest concern would be how the DCT holds up under tougher-than-Sonata utility use.

      • 0 avatar
        JMII

        Agree on both counts. I can only guess Ford went for a truck look since such vehicles are so popular and they wanted to “beef up” what is likely to be seen as the the baby shark of trucks. Hyundai went the opposite direction, almost to purposely avoid the “its a truck?” comparison. So the SC has a CUV look which I think will align better with its buyers. For example my wife LOVES the from-the-future button-less interior and sharp exterior design language. I’m good with the exterior too (way better aero) but think they should have given us real buttons and less glossy piano black inside. However compared to the Ranger the SC seems a full two generations ahead in interior quality.

        My main SC worries are:
        1) it will not be popular and thus aftermarket and even OEM support / parts maybe hard to come by down the road
        2) can a FWD DCT turbo really handle towing duty?

        My 20 year old V8 Dakota Quad Cab has been flawless in its towing mission… however it gets terrible fuel economy and is ignored by the wife who finds it “too big”. I agree with her on the size, as the bed sits empty 95% of the time.

  • avatar
    johnny ringo

    +1

  • avatar
    Imagefont

    The fact that something like 90% of full size trucks sold are crew cab and only about 3% are traditional regular cab tells you a lot about how the fast majority of pickups are used. Manufacturers stopped offering manual transmissions because they had a 3% take rate, so there is zero chance you’ll see regular cab mini pickups. And even the people crying for them wouldn’t actually buy them.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      A regular cab is a non starter but a clamshell cab might have a case.

    • 0 avatar
      Steve Biro

      There was a time when Detroit would build two-door vehicles – even though four-doors outsold them several times over. There was a time when they would offer manual transmissions – even though 90 percent of vehicles were equipped with automatics.

      Alas, Detroit has forgotten how to compete and therefore can’t come up with business models for anything but the most mainstream vehicles. Except… they can’t even do that. They pull back and leave every market segment in which they have to work hard.

      As for me, I have always bought standard cab, standard bed pickups with manual transmissions. They simply work best for me. Of course, Detroit isn’t going to listen to me and those like me. But if they won’t build such a truck again, then I and others simply won’t buy what they’re offerting. They’ll never know that, of course. But they may, after a time, say that there is no market for small trucks and leave that niche – once again.

      That’s fine… I’ll leave Detroit’s “mobility” companies to thier electric, pseudo-self-driving, subscription-based pods that gather your private information and sell to whoever will pay for it. Enjoy.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      A regular cab would be more difficult to do with a unibody, they were always offered in the past because it started as such and the extended or quad cab was added to the frame before the bed. I do feel an extended cab needs to be offered, the quad configuration is adding some amount of foot of length I don’t want.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Looks pretty huge, have the specs been released yet? Seems to be a Ford C2/Kuga which underpins the Escape. Can I get one about the footprint of the original Escape?

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I don’t care who they have in the Maverick ad and yes I doubt Gabrielle Union would drive this truck or any other Ford product–more like a Mercedes or BMW. I do care about the quality and price and about timing belts inside engines with the water pump. Will this truck hold up for 10 plus years or will it fall apart in 1 or 2 years?

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    “While designed in roughly the same spirit as the original”

    Really? What spirit is that?

    And where is the Mach-E outrage over Ford’s application of the storied Maverick name to a truck instead of a sedan?

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      I’m in the camp of people who thought it was brilliant of Ford to market and style the Mach-E as a Mustang, instead of some geeky blob (see: Chevrolet Bolt). But *is* the Maverick name all that storied?

      • 0 avatar
        DC Bruce

        Being old enough (72) to have been an adult when the original Maverick was released, I would answer your question with a definite “No.” The original Maverick was the spiritual successor to the Ford Falcon — a cheap car very much built to a price and yet another failed Detroit effort to compete with the Japanese makes and VW’s endless variants on the rear, aircooled engine Beetle (e.g. the Beetle, the New Beetle, the Fastback and the Squareback).

        PS, FWIW, I agree completely with your sentiments about the Mach-E although I confess to having criticized the expropriation of a fabled Mustang variant name for an EV crossover.

        Fortunately, FoMoCo probably doesn’t give a fig about what I or any of my contemporaries think. They probably think that, at best, “Maverick” is an obscure reference to “Top Gun.”

        • 0 avatar

          LOL…I knew an older kid in HS, who had the V8 Maverick. Scared the crap out of me when I rode with him….no one was surprised when he “slipped on some wet leaves” and wrecked the car. I recall it as amazingly cheap but with a big engine….

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          Failed what? It was $100 more than the VW Bug, $1,000 less than the Mustang, yet sporty, sexy, RWD and 100+ HP base.

          It did just fine without needing to put the Japanese imports back on a boat.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @DCBruce Agreed. The original Maverick was a POS sub-compact about as appealing as the Mustang II. It was a product of the malaise era. Even the optional 302 V8 was pathetic.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            A “pathetic” 302 with 220 HP and 300 lbs/ft? You could do better? In a subcompact? For under $2500?

            What ever you’re talking, I’d rather push the Maverick. But what was there to go wrong with the 302 and C4 trans or manual?

            The only thing Ford did wrong is not pricing it higher.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      I’m in the camp of people who thought it was brilliant of Ford to market and style the Mach-E as a Mustang, instead of some geeky blob (see: Chevrolet Bolt). But *is* the Maverick name all that storied?

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “What spirit is that?”

      Having compact dimensions and using styling cues from the next size classes up.

      And I know you are major Mach-E apologist but the Maverick badge is not storied.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Nailed it ajla.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        @ajla: You missed my sarcasm. Few people remember or miss the original Maverick.

        I don’t care what they call this thing. And I’m no “major Mach-E apologist”, except for the name.

        It amuses me that the people forget that it’s the mfr who defines what its vehicles are named, and what their attributes are. Around here, somehow a 4-cylinder 74 Mustang II qualifies as a Mustang, but a 22 Mustang Mach-E doesn’t.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Mach-E has moved 10K units through the end of May, on pace to meet my prediction of 20-25K units by year’s end. Some random EV site estimates 100K Model Ys have been sold since early 2020. So since all sales were a bit scarce until Q4 last year, figure about 12K units a month for the past nine months on average.

          So is Ford celebrating the fact it could sell any at all in the face of Tesla competition?

          “That record comes on the heels of the introduction of Ford’s first fully battery-electric vehicle, the Mustang Mach-E, late last year. Mach-E had 1,945 sales in May, bringing its year-to-date sales to more than 10,500.”

          https://www.detroitnews.com/story/business/autos/ford/2021/06/03/ford-sales-may-2021/7521946002/

          “We guess that Model 3 alone will soon reach 1 million units, as the first electric car ever to do so:

          Tesla Model 3 – probably above 950,000 (since mid-2017)
          Tesla Model Y – probably above 100,000 (since early 2020)”

          https://insideevs.com/news/499678/tesla-model-3y-million-sales/

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      The spirit as far as I can tell is to be the lowest priced vehicle in the Ford lineup. The fact that the original Maverick started out under $2000 was a big part of its marketing. I expect, if they can hold it down to the original intended starting price of under $20,000, that will be a huge part of the marketing for this version of the Maverick.

      • 0 avatar
        JMII

        Back in the 80s a mini-truck (like a Mazda B2200) was the cheapest vehicle on the lot. Half my buddies in high school had one for that very reason. Being RWD with nothing in the bed they were fun to slide around, way better then your typical FWD econobox.

        Given Ford now longer makes a small car the Maverick might be new way forward for cheap transportation.

  • avatar

    She just doesn’t age huh. 48!

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      ROFL at the 48 but its an inside joke I can’t explain in a public setting.

    • 0 avatar
      spookiness

      It’s a black woman thing. My last neighbor could have passed for her 30’s and was probably somewhere between 39 and 65. Who knows.

      Back on topic though. Let’s be honest, Mach-E aside, trucks are sorta the only thing Ford is reliably good at. Most people who want a 4-door full size truck probably already have one, so it makes to sense to make a different truck to try to sell to different people that don’t have/want/need what Ford already offers. Side note, I saw a Bronco Sport for the first time in the wild earlier this week. I thought it was a Land Rover at first. The driver was a young black woman.

  • avatar
    Nick_515

    I applaud Ford for offering this vehicle. I hope the AWD system doesn’t raise the vehicle too much (I don’t like what I see when the garage door opens, but I could be off in terms of scale). I’m definitively interested in it.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      https://www.motor1.com/news/497528/ford-maverick-size-spy-shots/

      Compared to the Ranger the Maverick is practically a low-rider. However the Ranger is a good 4 to 6″ higher then necessary… this is the main reason I moved onto the Santa Cruz.

      • 0 avatar
        Nick_515

        Thank you! Ok that’s better. And… the Ranger should have been as low. I agree with your comment above, in that the directional design of the Santa Cruz is smarter than “keeping it trucky” of this one.

        I know you tow, but I don’t, and if I do, it’ll be a long time before I surpass the #2000 limit. New homeowner plus tall dog puts a vehicle like this right in our sights. I’ll always keep a fast-ish German wagon for the road trips, but something small and versatile would serve well locally. So I’m leaning towards Santa Cruz as well. UNLESS one of them gets PHEV capability, in which case it’ll be a no brainer.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I’ve never heard of Gabrielle Union, but from now on I’ll know her as the Maverick girl.

    No matter – in the end, the product sells the product. Nobody takes a 60-month car loan on the word of a pretty face. Exhibit A: Mercury.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    That is the type of vehicle that interests me. I have been told to only shop something that ‘sits high’ for ease of access/egress. Due to snow accumulation I prefer higher road clearance.

    We do not tow. But use our vehicles regularly for carrying home project materials, garage sale finds, moving small pieces of furniture for our children, and toting golf equipment.

    So inexpensive and not too big, but with the above capabilities and 4 space to accommodate 4 ‘large’ passengers and 5 ‘in a pinch’ would make this almost ideal.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    I saw some shots online of this, but all were crew cab. Will it be offered in extended cab or perhaps have a short bed option?

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      As mentioned by someone else above: two door cabs don’t sell so I expected the Maverick to be a four door only configuration – even if that limits bed length. Many were upset the Santa Cruz changed from an extended cab to a crew cab between its concept stage and final production form. If Ford is smart they will put in a mid-gate then you have the best of both worlds, but that adds complexity and cost so I doubt it.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    This is something the U.S. market has needed for years and Ford is going to sell every last one they can build. We’ll know how many they can build from how aggressively they price it.

  • avatar
    JD-Shifty

    if it doesn’t get 30 highway it’s a non starter

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Shouldn’t it do better than that unloaded? I exceed 30mpg hwy in my Pontiac whose engine revision dates to 1996 and block to the late 1960s.

  • avatar
    NJRide

    I hope Ford does better with their interior in this than the Bronco Sport. Great looking car horrible miss on the interior (especially the seats).

  • avatar
    conundrum

    The original Maverick was a slapped-together restyled for less interior room Falcon, ten years on. Not sure if I ever saw a more sloppily thrown together car. Given Ford’s fit and finish problems of the last decade, the name for this choptop Escape seems well chosen. Then, load the bed with six hundred pounds of cement mix, and listen to that pretty peppy 245 hp turbo burn the front tires off on a mild grade when you boot the gas! Fantasmo.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    This non-truck is such a joke. A vehicle with zero capability. The Escape and poorly executed butch Escape have poor tow ratings and I don’t see this truck being able to carry more than a make up kit and some high heels in the bed.

    Ultimately this is the second introduction in a row of a completely useless truck from Ford. For a truck company they sure have no idea what they are doing.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I would have to see this Maverick in person and drive it. I would not be among the first to buy this because of possible first year defects and with shortages of chips and other parts Ford dealers are likely to charge above MSRP. People are paying above sticker now for new vehicles and in some cases dealers will not give out a price and buyers bid against each other. Not that anxious to buy anything in the next year. Agree that it will be more old men that will buy the Maverick including me but the main drawback for me is Ford turbo 3s and 4s with enclosed timing chains or belts inside the engines. A bad timing chain or belt or even a water pump can destroy these engines. I am ok with a smaller less capable truck but I am not ok with a potentially problematic engine.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Safety Update (time requirement = 3 minutes)

    Open this link and select “small” “pickups” in the appropriate dropdowns:
    https://www.iihs.org/ratings/driver-death-rates-by-make-and-model

    Scan through the default ‘2017’ death rates.

    Now select 2014, 2011, 2008, 2004 and 2002 in turn and see if you find anything interesting.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Very interesting; Ford trucks have become much safer, while everyone else stays about the same.

      • 0 avatar
        ToolGuy

        @SCE to AUX,

        To clarify, you’re stating that Tacoma hasn’t improved since 2002 levels, is that correct? [This would mean ‘range’ of 81-108 in 2002 data is “about the same” as range of ’21-29′ in 2017 data.]

  • avatar
    JD-Shifty

    The people who want this don’t buy new vehicles though….

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      It’s not that they don’t buy new vehicles, they want the pickup used and for occasional use. The supply of older S10, Hard Bodys, etc, thinned out decades ago for most of the country especially.

      • 0 avatar
        JD-Shifty

        a newer body style S-10 is my daily and it has 530K on it. you still see these and the blazer version all over the place here, but they are getting rusty. 15 or 20 years ago they were every 5th vehicle. SO far I’d have to say the Ridgeline is the best replacement if you don’t like the Tacoma’s MPG or price up front.

  • avatar
    wolfwagen

    This brings to light some other questions:

    When/Will Ram Drop the Fiat-based 700?
    What does GM have anything to compete with if the segment takes off?
    Does the Bremach Brio (if ever comes to market) become a competitor?
    Mahindra WTH?

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      If the segment does well I’d assume they will. Will it be a Ram or a Jeep (or both) is my question.

      GM can apply this treatment to any of the myriad of crossovers they sell just like Hyundai and Ford did and probably do it in less than the decade or so it seems to have taken Hyundai.

      Neither of the other 2 are coming to the US market.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Not true that everyone who wants a compact pickup will wait to buy used. I bought a new S-10 in 1999 and had it for over 20 years. I would be interested in buying a base Maverick but I will not buy any new vehicle until I look at it and drive it and I will not just pay any price. At 20k I would be interested if I like the truck. I would not buy any new vehicle during this pandemic with dealers charging up to 5k above MSRP. I will not pay above MSRP for any new vehicle. I would probably have to order since the dealers will only have higher trim loaded models of the Maverick. I could live with white if I could get a fleet model.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    Quote: The official debut happens on June 8th, with Ford hiring Gabrielle Union (who I verified is actually famous after a quick search.

    The fact you and I needed to do a search to verify this doesn’t exactly spark confidence in this choice but I hardly think Ford will even need to do much advertising for this smaller sized lower priced pickup and I predict they will fly off the shelf so to speak. I wonder what is up with the Fusion replacement.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    It is probably a waste of an advertising budget to have a celebrity advertise a compact truck. Just let the public know its available with a simple ad and it will sell.

  • avatar
    Keith Tomas

    I’m guessing by the name that slavuta is of East European descent? If so, it explains a lot….

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