By on March 19, 2021

Rivian is planning to install 3,500 fast-chargers and 10,000 Level 2 chargers in the U.S. and Canada.

That includes plans to install two Level 2 chargers at each of Colorado’s 42 state parks. Construction on those is planned for July.

Rivian is also planning to place chargers at malls, restaurants, campsites, and other places.

The AC chargers should provide about 25 miles per hour. Meanwhile, the fast chargers are projected to give drivers up to 140 miles of charge in 20 minutes.

While the fast chargers will only be installed at 600 locations, they will be powered by renewable energy, as Rivian is going to work with local companies to use wind and solar energy to provide the juice. Rivian plans to have all 13,500 chargers of both types fully installed by the end of 2023.

It’s a near certainty that Rivian will direct owners to chargers via the navigation system.

Although only Rivian owners will be able to access this network, Rivian drivers will still be able to use other networks.

Charge for me, not for thee, eh?

[Image: Rivian]

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21 Comments on “Rivian Working on Sustainable Fast Chargers...”


  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    “Rivian is going to work with local companies to use wind and solar energy to provide the juice”

    And I wonder whose batteries will power them at night? (And actually in the day, also, since you can’t directly wire such variable power sources to a load.)

    And I don’t see the point in starting their own private network. They should have cooperated with Tesla or Electrify America to utilize and expand those networks, which are likely already in the spots Rivian is targeting.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    It’s just a matter of time before the OEMs and the charging networks are disentangled, either voluntarily or by antitrust regulators. Eventually all of these will work like gas stations, metered but open to all EVs, and that will be a good outcome. There may be a discount for a specific OEM’s cars and that’s probably OK, so long as everyone can charge at more or less reasonable rates.

    • 0 avatar
      Kendahl

      The current charging situation is like each ICE manufacturer having its own fuel. Ford burns gasoline. GM burns diesel. Chrysler (or whatever they’re calling it now) burns propane. Until the EV part of the automobile industry standardizes on recharging, it won’t be ready for prime time. The Supercharger network makes Tesla, for all its problems, the only serious BEV manufacturer.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Why can’t I charge [or refuel!] my vehicle like this?

    https://www.aviationtoday.com/2017/05/12/airbus-demonstrates-new-automated-aerial-refueling-technology/

  • avatar
    stuki

    They’re no doubt planning magic pixiedust as well. Everyone is, these days. It’s, like, the it thing… Emphasis planning.

    As for actually building (not planning, not working on, not “inveeeesting” in…) sustainable anything whatsoever, including a business? Too quaint, boring and frankly pointless; in an era where the Fed will rob the ever dwindling number of remaining productives, in order to pay for the clowns’ childish follies, either way. Besides, that would require some actual talent, competence and aptitude. For something.

  • avatar
    dwford

    A friend with a newly purchased used Chevy Bolt just spent $16.75 to gain 30 miles of range in 45 minutes at an EVgo charging station. That’s not a recipe for success.

    • 0 avatar

      Was it in Texas? I heard electricity is very expensive there.

      • 0 avatar
        dwford

        No, Connecticut, where I pay $.0725/kwh at home. This particular EVgo charger is supposed to charge at 50kw, and the Bolt has DC charging, but obviously that didn’t work out yesterday.

        People in CT are always crying about expensive electricity. Is $.0725/kwh expensive?

        • 0 avatar
          Imagefont

          7 cents a kWh is practically free. Anyone’s who complains about that is a pathetic whiner.

          • 0 avatar
            dwford

            The problem in CT is that the “delivery fee” and all the other fees more than double the bill. If I spend $50 on actual electricity I spend another $80 on fees

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          National average is $.12~.13/kwh.

          Public charging is either a rip off or a huge rip off depending on where you are at and what provider you are at.

          Some of it is the provider and how they charge but a lot of that depends on the laws in a given state. Some states say you can’t charge by the kwh, only power companies can do that. So in those states you must charge by time. Some have tiers based on the charger’s output, but it isn’t really based on the output but is based on what the car tells the station its peak charge rate is.

          If if you are in a state where they can charge you by the kwh that price is typically 3-4 times the rate you would pay at home in that area.

          • 0 avatar

            In Bay area CA we pay about 30 cents per kwh which includes delivery fee.

          • 0 avatar
            rudiger

            That’s steep. $0.30/kWh is about the same as what it would cost to go on a gallon of gas (currently ~$3.30). Doesn’t seem worth the EV premium, as well as the general hassle of charging versus just filling-up.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            “general hassle of charing versus just filling up”

            The general hassle is filling up, not charging, as long as you’re lucky enough to be able to install a L2 charger at home.

            I have to find time every few weeks to take my Highlander to the gas station, which is out of the way of my usual trips. No such hassle exists with my Bolt.

          • 0 avatar
            rudiger

            Can’t deny that a home Level 2 EVSE tips the scales in favor of an EV, at least in the convenience sense.

            Financial? Not so much, particularly if the residence is located in the Bay Area…

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Still cheaper than California gas per mile.

            Here in a place with a functional utility, I pay a raw price of 11¢/kWh, or somewhere around 15-16¢/kWh after all fees. The fuel cost for the Bolt is around 4 cents/mile, while the fuel cost for the Highlander is about three times that. And that’s before we get into the very different maintenance requirements.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            On the flip side, I drove from Alabama to Maryland last week in a rental Expedition EX-L (3 people and lots of equipment). With its tank size we only stopped once for fuel and Taco Bell and were back on the road in about 20 minutes.

            Our hotel has no charger. I dare say this would be a considerably more aggravating trip in an EV likely requiring us to leave a day earlier. I do this sort of trip fairly regularly and have no desire to extend already long trips.

            Incidentally this is my first trip with the expedition. We usually get an Armada but stepped up size wise due to the extra person this time. The Suburban with Captains Chairs we got before was nice as well, but the Expedition rode much better, though I think that was a last gen Suburban.

            Even when we go back to flying I can only recall one place (Sierra Vista, Fort Huachuka) where the hotel had a charger.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Yes, if you drive a full Expedition between Alabama and Maryland on a regular basis you will best be served by ICE cars for a while. But you’re also an edge case, not remotely representative of the typical American driver.

      • 0 avatar
        Imagefont

        I live in the Dallas area and I get a weekly email regarding my electric bill (Green Mountain Energy). I pay approximately 11 cents a kWh with all fees, all in. I consider that very cheap.

  • avatar
    Imagefont

    Rivian is all hat and no cattle.

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