By on March 10, 2021

Airstream

Airstream recently released its Flying Cloud 30FB Office floor plan, putting dedicated office space in its most popular product line. Replacing a sleeping area with office space, the idea was formulated due to the growing popularity of working remotely and the idea of digital nomadism.

Airstream

At 30 feet in length, the 30FB Office is a double-axle travel trailer that weighs in at 6,757 pounds, with a maximum trailer capacity (GVWR) of 8,800 pounds, making it towable with a 3/4-ton pickup. With a queen bed, bench, and a convertible dinette, the 30FB Office still provides room for six to sleep, and the starting price is $107,500.

Airstream

This version differs from Airstream’s standard 30FB with its dedicated workspace. It has an office chair that can be tucked out of the way, allowing for one person to sleep or relax, and while it contains things you’d expect in an office like storage and drawers, there are a divider and black-out curtains to provide separation while Zoom conferencing, and three windows for a view of the outdoors. Additionally, there are multiple USB ports, a pull-out table for more workspace, grommets on the desk to mount a monitor or organize cables, and overhead storage cabinets with dry-erase surfaces.

Airstream

Bob Wheeler, Airstream President and CEO said, “Airstream has always provided the freedom of a mobile living, playing, and working space, but the Flying Cloud 30FB Office takes that promise to the next level with flexibility and comfort in a design inspired by real-world experience. We learned a lot – not only about the necessity of connectivity and options for increased power, but about the joy of closing your laptop and stepping out onto the trail. They’d found a seamless transition between work and play and travel, and we wanted to find a way to bring the unique freedom of this work from anywhere lifestyle to the community, as well as to new audiences.”

Airstream

[Images: Airstream]

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49 Comments on “Airstream 30FB Office Travel Trailer Perfect for Working From Anywhere...”


  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I don’t have a truck, so I nicely configured a RAM 2500 to $75k, because you can’t pull a $107k trailer with a crappy truck.

    Just because I can work remotely doesn’t mean I want to take my work to the great outdoors. I go there to escape work, and I’d hate to spend $150-200k on vehicles only to discover that I’m trapped 8 hours a day in my Airstream office while the family is off enjoying the area we’ve camped in.

  • avatar
    CKNSLS Sierra SLT

    SCE-
    AN F-150 with the max tow package would pull that quite nicely.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      It could but it’s not recommended. Crosswinds don’t play nice, even for this shiny steel suppository. Might as well call it 9K lbs wet weight.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        I agree. If I’m semi-regularly towing anything with two axles and an enclosed body then I’m getting an HD truck.
        I’d skip the diesel though unless I was going over 14k or lived in Denver.

      • 0 avatar
        Wheatridger

        You might be surprised. I used to own a 16′ Scamp trailer, sort of a fiberglass Airstream. My wife and I towed that from Denver to Seattle, Kentucky, the Black Hills, and around our home state. Never, not once, did I feel a smidgen of sway, even though the tow car was only a humble non-turbo Forester. This was a 2000 lb trailer, light for its size, and it presented a lot of sail to the wind. It’s the lack of corners, I think, that gives the Scamp’s Airstream-like design such stability. Square corners create drag, giving sidewinds something to grip onto. That’s why airplanes don’t have square fuselages. So I’d expect that this heavyweight hot dog on wheels would tow beautifully.

        • 0 avatar
          stuki

          Long, high pitch inertia (weight distributed along the entire length) multi axle trailers, can start dancing to their own beat on occasion. Which the latest crop of lightness-uber-alles half tons are a lot worse at keeping in check, than heavier tow vehicles.

          Not that a half ton can’t tow it. If it’s an occasional thing, and the truck mainly serves lighter roles, it’s fine. But based on the assumption the “office” is there to make lots-of-and-long-time’ing easier, HDs are simply better suited to pull something this big on a regular basis.

        • 0 avatar
          kcflyer

          “That’s why airplanes don’t have square fuselages” The Shorts 360 just entered the conversation. :)

        • 0 avatar
          teddyc73

          @Wheatridger…not just a Forester but a “humble” Forester.

  • avatar
    CKNSLS Sierra SLT

    Here we go-non-towers and non truck owners commenting on a trucks capability. Look up what the F150 with the MAX tow will do. It’s 14,000 pounds-in the right configuration.

    FOR THE RECORD-I have towed a 30 foot 5,500 pound travel trailer from coast to coast. I tow over the rocky mountains west on a regular basis. Across VERY HIGH mountain passes.

    Cross winds? That’s what a weight distributing/anti sway hitch is for. You can look that up too.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “non-towers”

      Got it.
      i.ibb.co/wKBqfvY/IMG-20190208-165502907.jpg

      I’m not the trailer police. If you want to tow this across the country with a specifically-optioned half-ton truck then go for it. Personally though, I’m sticking to an HD truck at that length and weight.

      • 0 avatar
        CKNSLS Sierra SLT

        Aja

        That’s a nice rig. You are in a whole different category. Obviously-you probably don’t follow which half-ton trucks will do what.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          Here’s my friend’s setup:
          i.ibb.co/9V9YkfJ/IMG-20200530-133023758.jpg

          That’s a 6.2L Silverado 1500, which had a 9800K towing capacity when new. It also has a professionally-installed sway control hitch which you can see in the photo. That trailer is a little under 30 ft long and as it sits a little under 8000lbs.
          He took that from Florida to Montana and while he didn’t die, when he got back he did not speak highly of how the Silverado performed. I’ve heard similar things from half-ton owners of nearly every brand when they try to pull travel trailers of similar dimensions.

          Now, I have not tried towing with a ’21 max tow F-150 so maybe that *can* handle things fine. However, I don’t see anything related to that option package that would be magic over a regular EB either. Until I really see evidence otherwise I’d keep to the Super Duty if I wanted a Flying Cloud or larger and save half-tons for the Caravel & Bambi.

          • 0 avatar
            DC Bruce

            That’s me in the photo with my then new 2015
            Sierra 1500 cargo capacity rated at 1940 lbs. and powered by the 6.2 liter DI engine rated at 420 hp. With this truck, we have taken our Airstream Flying Cloud 27 (7600 lbs. GVWR) 6 times across country, to every National Park in the West (and every National Park in the east for that matter). With a self-imposed top speed of 60-65 (assuming posted limit permits) I have never felt any instability or, for that matter, lack of power. Except on super steep grades, engine rpms stay below 3000, typically around 2000.
            What is it about the diesel heads that they keep over-spec’ing their tow vehicles? Yes, I have an expensive Pro Pride anti-sway weight distribution hitch, but even in high winds on the Texas Panhandle in November, I never felt anywhere near the edge of control. If I were towing this 30 footer, I might consider a 3/4 ton diesel only for the additional engine braking that the exhaust brake affords.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “cargo capacity rated at 1940 lbs”

            You have an NHT then.
            I don’t have any experience with the NHT GM trucks or a Max tow/payload F-150 (it seems like on the Ford you really need both packages). Those might be a good compromise for people with certain trailer sizes although on this 30FB “Office” I still think I’d want a 3/4 ton.

      • 0 avatar
        Mike-NB2

        I agree. I got a 2019 Ranger for my wife so we could haul a 24′ (27′ bumper to ball) 4000 lb dry weight trailer and use a weight distribution and anti-sway hitch. Even though the Ranger will haul 7500 lbs I would not haul anything more than what we have now. Unless it is a utility trailer with 7000 lbs of gravel or something. The trailer and Ranger are close in weight and there can be instances of the tail wagging the dog. I also limit my speed to 90 km/h / 55 mph when hauling.

        But to each his own. I have a friend with a Tacoma (6500 towing capacity) and he is looking at a new trailer with a 33 foot bumper to ball length and a dry weight of 6000 lbs. Can he haul it? Sure. Is it as safe as it could be? Nope.

        Towing capacity is just one number to be aware of.

        On topic, an office in a trailer is a great idea. I’m sure this ‘new normal’ will show up in more affordable trailers too.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      I’ve towed, just not with a truck.

      But that’s not what this article is really about. My point is that I’m not interested in working in a vacation spot, which is specifically what this Airstream is designed for.

    • 0 avatar
      Oberkanone

      OK Mr Smarty Towpants F-150 is just fine for you to tow this trailer. For me, 3/4 ton is right tool for the job.

  • avatar
    Imagefont

    You also need an engine with at LEAST 900 lbs of torque so you can tow the trailer up hill at 105 mph at 30,000 feet elevation. That’s very important….

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      I just read about a fellow who has 1.3 million miles on an F350 superduty that’s only 7 years old. He averages 135,000 miles on a set of Michelins. He says he won’t go over 55-60 when towing heavy and let’s the truck slow to 30-35mph on hills. 3 turbos and he just replaced the transmission.
      Too many drivers compensate for a lack of thinking and skill with size and HP.

    • 0 avatar
      Wheatridger

      Good one, Imagefont!

      Every discussion of trailers devolves into arguments over tow ratings. Whatever car or truck you have, it isn’t good enough. You need twice the power, twice the road-hugging weight! That’s the sound of desk jockeys, chattering about the trailers they’ll never own and the trips they’ll never take.

      My experience consists of towing a one-ton trailer with a two-ton, underpowered car, perfectly safely for about 8,000 total miles, half of that in the Colorado Rockies. I wasn’t a particularly confident tow-er (the trailer was my wife’s brainchild). But that was my biggest safety asset, along with trailer brakes- humility! That little dose of fear that focuses the mind and makes you look and think farther ahead, knowing that your stopping distance and handling capabilities are now more like they are on snow and ice. Accepting that every other car will rush to pass you, no matter how fast you’re going.

      I don’t know if I would have maintained that same alertness if I’d been coddled in some plush, powerful uber-pickup. If I hadn’t been speed-limited by a wheezy 2.5 engine, I might have forgotten that all trailer tires were stamped “Maximum 65 MPH” on the sidewalls.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        Respectfully, a 16ft 2000lb single-axle trailer is not a 30ft 8800lb trailer nor a 40ft 18000lb 5th wheel.

        I don’t advocate for HD trucks when towing trailers over a certain length, weight, and construction because I want to have a giant internet pen*s. I do it because they legitimately do a better job towing those things. You can’t “humility” your way out of every situation, especially as the mass of your trailer increases.

  • avatar
    RHD

    If you have the cash to buy this trailer and a truck to pull it with, you are close to retiring just by putting that money in some solid dividend-bearing stocks instead.
    If you have an office job that you could do in this trailer, you probably can’t afford to buy it.
    At least the chair can be put away for a place to sleep, or, in HR parlance, to engage in some harassment or a bit of workplace hanky-panky.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      Noone who can afford anything works for it anymore. That was, and is, the specific purpose of central banking, after all: From the productive, to the connected.

      Instead, they sit in Manhattan Condos, on Jackson ranches, or in yachts and Airstreams and “trade” something they know nothing about (if they did know anything, they’d be sitting somewhere less far less posh on accout of “insider trading”), while the Fed redistributes ever greater shares of other people’s value-add their way. It’s America, after all. In the financialized, hence dystopian, era.

      Regardless, a desk doesn’t necessitate a low paying “office job.” Editing surf videos for your Youtube channel, is a lot nicer on a real computer on a real desk, than from a couch. Or even from a dinette, unless you’re traveling in your 30 footer by yourself. Ditto putting the finishing touches on a dance or country hit, or even just IClouding in some voiceover work, while overlooking the Grand Canyon.

      I’m much more surprised by anyone who would drag something this big around, if it didn’t have a decent desk and chair.

      • 0 avatar
        teddyc73

        @stuki…I work for the things I can afford. I get the impression you are a little jealous of those who make more money than you.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          It’s the old “If they make more than me they are cheating and their wealth is I’ll gotten” and “If they make less than me they are lazy and should work harder” mindset.

          Like I said below, I work with people that have rigs in this price range. They are tech types. We pay them that money because they are great at it. Perhaps the O.P. should have chosen a field that paid better. In my field the saying would be “get good”.

        • 0 avatar
          stuki

          “I work for the things I can afford.”

          Most people do.

          And most people can’t afford anything anymore…….

    • 0 avatar
      teddyc73

      That’s not necessarily true. There are a lot of people out there at different points in their lives who could afford this trailer. There are also plenty of “office” jobs with salaries that make this trailer attainable. Stop generalizing.

  • avatar
    Sobro

    I just bought a brand new 4400 lb dry weight 20 ft Coleman travel trailer in January. My 2002 F150, 4.6l, no towing package, 6000 lb towing capacity, was not up for the job once the trailer had things like t-shirts and canned goods loaded into it.

    The TT community says you have to keep your trailer loaded weight at less than 90% of listed capacity for safety and longevity of your tow vehicle.

    I bought a 2012 Yukon Denali, 6.2l 400hp, 8000lb tow capacity for my new tow vehicle. The only problem I foresee is the self-leveling air suspension failing, but a few bucks and some springs will remedy that.

    Two weeks ago I towed the TT from Nashville to West Palm Beach and back. It was a great learning experience, especially since Camping World *spit* didn’t see fit to include the [online only] user manuals for the trailer brake and weight distribution hitch, nor did they mention that the hitch and brake setup they performed *spit* was only for the unloaded trailer and that it MUST be adjusted after loading.

    I did eventually get the tow setup sorted and safe during the trip.

    Oh btw, camper and tow vehicle together OTD price was $41,500. I’m not sure you can buy an Airstream-branded patio set for that amount.

  • avatar
    redapple

    I m money ahead.
    Real expensive car.
    Real nice hotels every night.
    After I visit the National Parks and points of interest.

    Way ahead.

  • avatar
    redapple

    Slow.
    Blocking lanes.
    Lumbering around the gas pumps.

    HATE these things and dont understand the attraction.

  • avatar
    36hp

    I got an old van and went on a long camping trip — about 7 years. During this time #vanlife became a trend. And so, what was an alternative lifestyle became gentrified homelessness.

    First time to post — love this site.

  • avatar
    Pig_Iron

    Please make the photographs so we can click them and blow them up to (near) full screen.
    :-)

  • avatar
    Sidewall Nation

    I’m enjoying the discussion on tow vehicles. While researching replacing a 16′ fiberglass trailer for a long term, cross-country trip I started with a either the new F-150 diesel or hybrid and the full size GM SUVs with the 3.0l Duramax. However, after meeting all our “needs” every travel trailer is over 10k GVWR. Still in the realm of the F-150, but now I’m looking at fifth-wheels. Now I’m onto the F-250, though the F-350 is better, but only if it is DRW (dual rear wheel) and has an 8′ bed, and eventually last night I catch myself looking at F-450s on ebay.

    I believe you should buy a vehicle for what you do 95% of the time, not what you might need to do 5% or 0.5%. So, if I have wait half a day at a truck stop on I-80 in Wyoming for wind gusts to subside I think I’d rather do that and have a more comfortable vehicle to drive around when not towing. It’s just hard to know where exactly that sweet spot is without experience.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “I believe you should buy a vehicle for what you do 95% of the time, not what you might need to do 5% or 0.5%.”

      I agree with that almost always but with two big exceptions:
      1. Something you seriously want to track
      2. If you are planning to tow an enclosed trailer more than about 10 miles.

      Like I said before I’m not the towing police, but if you prefer an F-150 because it fits in your lifestyle better then you really should give serious consideration to buying a lighter and shorter trailer.

      Or get a Class C/A.

      • 0 avatar
        Sidewall Nation

        While there are some travel trailers that would work that fall comfortably within the capabilities of a 1/2 ton truck I’m mostly looking at fifth-wheels and HD trucks now. The question then becomes dually or not and how much difference does a long bed make (Supercrew, 8′ bed)? Sparing all the details the trailer would be moved only so often, but the truck will be used frequently for work and recreation. Yes, comfort is a consideration and so is taking it through an urban area or down a forest service road. A 3/4 ton seems like a good compromise, just wish I could try everything out before making two substantial purchases.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          A 3/4 ton (especially if it is a 4×4 and diesel) will run out of payload capacity with many 5th wheels so make sure you keep an eye on that spec as well.

          If you’re going over about 35ft on a 5th wheel then you probably want a long bed. No experience with DRW trucks.

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      If ride comfort unloaded is important to you, consider a 2500 Ram with the coils or the air suspension. It really does make a difference; it won’t be half ton smooth but it is noticeably better than Ford.

      If Ram had made an aluminum bodied truck I’d be driving one right now.

      • 0 avatar
        Sidewall Nation

        Thank you for the recommendation. I used Ford as an example only because I’m more familiar with them. I’ll test drive all the Big Three before I buy anything. It’s part of the fun of liking vehicles.

  • avatar
    merfk

    My work wouldn’t let me put that in the parking lot and they don’t have an electric hook up to run the air conditioner and my computer.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    It is a niche product. At least 4 of our contractors are remote and drive around the country in campers and RV’s (plus one or 2 in houseboats) and they all spent this sort of money on their rigs. It is a profitable niche likely for people that live out of these things or spend a ton of time on a job site away from home…not really a “let me check my email while I have the kids at the lake over the weekend” type deal.

    • 0 avatar
      Sidewall Nation

      I’m curious what the margins are on Airstreams. Their parent company, Thor Industries, makes so many versions of the of same trailer under a myriad of brands with very little variation, yet Airstream is off in its own prestigious niche. I think only a Bowlus or a Living Vehicle are comparable and for much more money.

      I agree that this is a very good product to offer for a specific user, especially when no one else is providing an alternative.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Yeah, they have got to have decent margins. I know Airstrams are in a different league but looking at how your average Travel Trailer is built versus what they sell for you have to think they have pretty good margins. I’ve had a few different brands, but never new. Too many out there that didn’t get much use.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff Semenak

      The huge pay-off is, Tax Deduction as ‘Office’ Space. Write the whole damn thing off, in your first year.

  • avatar
    teddyc73

    Great idea. I would like to see more entry level RV manufactures incorporate this concept. For someone like me considering working remotely in warmer areas during the winter it would be ideal.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    I know a couple who are living the nomadic lifestyle right now with their 8-year-old and two cats. They considered a trailer like this one and a truck, but decided the combination was too expensive. Instead they got a lightly used ProMaster-based motorhome. I honestly can’t believe they’re all spending months on the road in such a small vehicle, but they seem happy.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    I’ve spent my entire life doing things the wrong way. But I always bring 50% more truck than legally required to do the job. Is it why I’m still here?

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