By on February 17, 2021

While we knew Fiat Chrysler Automobiles would have to undergo substantial changes after it merged with PSA Group to form Stellantis, many enthusiasts were holding out hope that the North American Street & Racing Technology (SRT) engineering team would skate by unmolested.

No such luck. 

Over the weekend, Mopar Insiders reported that the newly formed company had actually disbanded SRT so its members could be reintegrated into the general population. Our assumption was that the company didn’t want want to advertise that it had dissolved the group responsible for some of the most memorable and exciting Mopar models in history. But the company explained itself when prompted.

“All of the core elements of the SRT performance engineering team have been integrated into our company’s global engineering organization,” a Stellantis spokesperson told the outlet. “This action will have the two-way benefit of ensuring that our brands’ SRT and performance-focused product offerings continue to meet the highest quality standards and expectations while delivering key learnings from motorsports and other high-performance-technology applications across a wider mix of our company’s product lines.”

“These products have delighted enthusiasts for nearly two decades, and Stellantis will continue to sell and develop the next generation of Dodge//SRT-branded vehicles, as well as Jeep and Ram vehicles that utilize high-performance SRT technology,” she concluded.

While that makes it sound as though the whole company will be benefiting from SRT’s engineering prowess, plenty of folks on this side of the pond don’t care about how well this decision is going to work out for the Citroën Berlingo. Still, hope remains that PSA engineers can be similarly tapped to improve the performance of future models slated for our roads.

As for the name, everything we’ve heard since the merger was approaching completion suggested that future SRT models would be a Dodge-only affair. Jeep’s high-performance models will carry the Trackhawk name while Chrysler is just a giant question mark.

2015 Dodge Viper SRT, Image: FCA

[Images: FCA/Stellantis]

 

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74 Comments on “Pack It Up: Stellantis Disbands SRT Engineering Team...”


  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Without a single team focused on SRT upgrades, the name and the hardware itself will simply wind down to nothing. Sad.

    • 0 avatar
      wolfwagen

      Agreed. The SRT DNA will not migrate into other vehicles it will just be diluted to nothing.

      The SRT group was kind of the last active in-house HI performance group in the domestics (Ford SVT has not done anything since 2014, short of the raptor which dropped the SVT moniker in 2017).

    • 0 avatar
      DC Bruce

      The key “tell” in the corporate spokesperson’s statement is the use of the word “branded.” In other words, as in so many other instances post-merger, the products will attempt to coast on the reputation of their predecessors’ past glory.

      “Branded,” indeed.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        Many a great product has disappeared this way. Milk what you can out of the brand recognition until it is meaningless. Maytag went this way. Toyota too. SRT is what kept that ancient platform saleable. Don’t be surprised if in the end, all that remains is Ram and Jeep.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    It’s official.

    Dodge is a dead brand walking and Chrysler is a zombie.

    The only way I see Dodge surviving is merging back with Ram as Dodge-Ram again.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      No, Chrysler is dead. Dodge will continue to be an American “brand”, but will be a Peugeot underneath. Stellantis honcho knows Dodge will sell in America, but Peugeot won’t. I wonder if he’s thinking Citroen can be the upscale/lux brand Chrysler once was in the American market, or if it would be easier to try to resurrect the Chrysler brand (with Citroen underpinnings).

  • avatar
    JMII

    This is a bummer. SRT was the one thing Dodge had going for it. Someone needs to start stock piling those Hellcat crate engines because there is no way they will ever release another like it.

  • avatar
    Norman Stansfield

    It’s the 70’s all over again.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      Glorified golf carts, if not [word connoting “cat”]-ified androgynous pods being the ultimate end to the “Malaise Era v2.0” to come!

      We’re not going to have a happy ending like the last one. Heartbreaking!

      • 0 avatar
        Syke

        Care to run up against my Chevy Bolt at a stoplight before you start with that line too loudly?

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          Isn’t a bolt like a 16 second 1/4 mile car? I am a fan mind you, but not because they are especially quick.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            More like a 15 seconds. The Bolt isn’t slow but you can certainly get a quicker ICE car so I don’t quite get Syke’s dunk there.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            You will win a lot more stoplight drags than the 0-60 or quarter mile numbers would indicate because the powertrain is so quick to respond. But it’s not like you’ll beat a Hellcat, or any seriously fast ICE car.

          • 0 avatar
            APaGttH

            Bolt is in the high 14s via multiple stories and reports.

            I’m seeing 14.7 to 14.9

            https://www.motortrend.com/cars/chevrolet/bolt-ev/2017/2017-chevrolet-bolt-ev-vs-2016-tesla-model-s-60/

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            OK @APaGttH, still not something I’m scared to line my ICE car up against

    • 0 avatar
      Superdessucke

      I called this several months ago on here I believe. Biden is very Carter-esque. But look forward to getting a muscle car for cheap like you could in ’75.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        It isn’t Biden’s fault that the Europeans calling the shots at Stelantis see no future in HellCatting everything.

        • 0 avatar
          Lorenzo

          The Europeans calling the shots are primarily Carlos Tavares, a smart cookie who knows over half Stellantis’ profits are from the American Market. It’s mostly Jeep, but he knows he has to lie low during the electrification craze.

          Electric cars will founder on battery materials shortages and high battery costs making the average electric car much more expensive than a thrifty ICE powered car.

          When that happens, he, like the Japanese, will be ready with small ICE vehicles that will sell for thousands less, but a premium over current ICE prices.

          The car battery shortage and price spike may take awhile, but electrical power problems in California and now Texas, our two biggest states, is now seeping into the public psyche.

          Add Elon Musk’s statement we’ll need more electrical generation to switch to all electric vehicles, and companies like Toyota and Stellantis, retaining their ICE capacity, will be positioned to dominate the US car market.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Can we stop this “Texas shows that EVs won’t work” non argument already? Gas pumps run on electricity too.

          • 0 avatar
            Matt Posky

            You can use a rotary hand pump to move liquid fuel or oil without electricity. Plenty of people have them in their garages. You can also syphon fuel with a hose if necessary.

            If the power went down for an extended period, I would absolutely unquestionably positively want to have a gasoline or (preferably) diesel-driven vehicle.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            “You can use a rotary hand pump to move liquid fuel or oil without electricity.”

            No you can’t. Try going to your local gas station with a pump or siphon hose.

            Neighbors of mine that don’t have solar have natural gas-driven generators. That would charge a car and not being in Texas, our natural gas systems are winterized. When I get solar, I’m planning on dual powerwalls, so I’ll have that option. Serously, you think some gas station is going to let you drop a siphon hose into their tanks?

          • 0 avatar
            Matt Posky

            No but THEY can use a crank if they want to continue selling gas or you can use it to move whatever fuel you have stored or manage to scrounge up while the power is out.

            Solar panels have real merit and I use small ones for a multitude of things, including camping. But you would need a fairly large array and an expensive setup with good storage capacity to reliably charge a vehicle if the grid went down. It doesn’t seem realistic if you also plan on powering your home during a prolonged outage or happen to lack $15k (ore more) to spend on converting your property into a solar hub. I’m sure the math will work out for more people as the technology improves and EVs become better ay sharing/keeping their charges, but I don’t see it as as a good fix for regular people who might need to cover more than 500 miles per month. They would need something like four 300watt panels and fairly consistent sunlight to make that happen and it would have to be almost totally dedicated to the car.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “but electrical power problems in California and now Texas”

            Texas’s current(no pun intended) electrical problems are due to the belief that a deregulated free market is the best. Free markets work well when the consumer can refuse the product and shop around or not buy.

            The free market companies chose not to upgrade their cold weather protection when this happened a decade ago.
            Politicians due to ideology did not legislate a better system. Also due to politics, the Texas grid is independent from the east or west grids.
            The main system collapse occurred with Natural gas plants freezing and their nuclear reactor freezing.
            Those with electricity have been hit with $9,000 bills. Those without are screwed due to frozen pipes.

            Solar and wind account for a very small portion of electrical generation. Failures with windmills were also due to companies not building cold resistant windmills. We have them in Canada and they hold up to -45C weather.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Anyone who calls “malaise” probably doesn’t remember what malaise was. So for for some perspective…compare the performance stats of a current Honda Civic to something like the Mercedes 450SE 6.9 – or pretty much anything from that era, for that matter – and make the argument again with a straight face.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      It’s a lot worse than that.

      Burning seedcorn was, after all, a much more viable strategy back when there was still some left to burn. 50 years of nothing but; all in a Hail Mary to redistribute, to the sort of halfwits capable of making such statements with a straight face, virtually all output of the ever dwindling few who still bother instead of simply angling to join the redistribution rackets themselves; has pretty much ended that luxury, for all of the once-was West.

      Instead, what these know-nothing, can-nothing, understand-nothing, produce-nothing clowns will do, is put what they believe is “powerful” “brand cues” on emission credits, and on stock and bond certificates hawked to the undifferentiated mass of absolute idiots who has had it all redistributed their way. After all, even idiots can print those up.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Cheer up.

    Reason #1 (skip to the “Final Tally” section):
    https://rallygroupbshrine.org/the-group-b-cars/rally-cars/peugeot-205-t16-e1e2/

    Reason #2:
    https://sportscardigest.com/lancia-delta-s4/

    Reminder:
    https://blog.consumerguide.com/the-brands-of-stellantis/

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Group B spawned some amazing cars.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      It has been quite a while since the Lancia that would build that existed though. You talk about Dodge becoming a shell of their former selves…Lancia has been there for decades sadly since your example and many other examples show how great they once were.

      • 0 avatar
        ToolGuy

        @Art Vandelay,

        If memory serves (doubtful), you have enjoyed smaller tossable cars in the past, and I believe you drove home with your Challenger [Charger?] after going shopping for a Fiat.

        Carlo Tavares knows more than the average bear and has done a fair amount of actual racing. Meet me back here in June of 2026 and we will see if Stellantis has any products for sale in the U.S. market which interest you.

        https://www.motortrend.com/news/stellantis-chrysler-dodge-brand-ceo/

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          Yep, this is true @toolguy. Of course that omits the end of that story where six months in I realized the Challenger was kind of a chore to drive daily and the sound was the only fun thing about it at non go to jail speeds. Add to that the “you want to do some basic mods, like headers? That’ll be a grand to crack the ECU and your warranty is void as well as the “hemi tax” on parts. I have a reliable and pretty new truck so I didn’t mind something that needed a wrench on it from time to time and have been wanting to build a project (hence the 5.3 on the stand in the garage). The current prices of used cars and and the cash that was on the hood of the Dodge when I leased it meant I could get out of it without much damage. I drove Miatas of all generations and even another Fiesta ST (thousands more than what I could have gotten mine for) as well as the 124 again. What I ended up really wanting was something tossable, but with the power the Dodge had. Enter the…wait for it, I know you will love this…the C5 Corvette.

          I still have a soft spot for hot hatches, but I have no desire to do anything serious to a FWD car. And if you are going to get into a motor, the LS is sort of the king of doing that without breaking the bank. I had considered the 5.3 in a Miata, but upon driving the C5 realized GM had sort of done it for me.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          I do hope they bring some of that over though. I know they have done some batcrap crazy stuff in the past and would probably be willing to give one a shot.

  • avatar

    One word: BEV. Actually three words, but you get the idea. With BEV SRT does not make sense.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    They’re still p!ssed that their euro trash was laughed out of the US, some of it twice

  • avatar
    schmitt trigger

    There is a single word missing in the official statement;

    “All of the core elements of the SRT performance engineering team have been LOBOTOMIZED and integrated into our company’s global engineering organization,”

    • 0 avatar
      Old_WRX

      schmitt trigger,

      “LOBOTOMIZED and integrated into our company’s global engineering organization,”

      But, they probably have a lot of SRT emblems and double sided sticky tape so SRT isn’t really dead:-)

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Just a matter of time until the Chrysler and Dodge brands no longer exist.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    I don’t know how you possibly could replace a team that thought up the unprecendented, incredibly unique idea of slapping a big supercharger on a big pushrod V8.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Profitably *and* for a lower price than Ford or GM managed to offer in those classes. If it was that easy everyone would be doing it.

      The SRT team was also responsible for the Viper and SRT4.

      Their overall ability to take off the shelf stuff and make things happen should be admired not mocked. If it was that easy everyone would have done it.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        I know that’s unfair, mostly because of the last Viper, which really was an achievement. But the market spoke loud and clear: it didn’t want Vipers, it wanted mailed-in Hellcats. I’m being snide about consumers as much as about FCA.

        • 0 avatar
          jack4x

          Run a Hellcat and a C7 Z06 hard back to back on a hot day and tell me which one is mailed in.

          The Hellcats are no different in concept than anything from M or AMG lately either. The days of uniquely engineered powertrains for those vehicles are over, now it’s just turning up the boost vs. the lesser models.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          They may not be your style but I’m not sure what’s “mailed-in” about the Hellcats. Making 707hp+ vehicles that have an MSRP under $100k, on platforms that likely weren’t initially designed for it, with a full new car warranty, and likely on a shoestring budget isn’t something that you toss together on your lunch break.
          As Jack pointed out the FCA products didn’t exactly fall on its face compared to what’s out there either.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            The Hellcats seem to me like an answer to the question “What do we have to do to put a monster supercharged V8 in a car and not have it break in the warranty period” more than “how do we make a satisfying performance car.” The answer to every problem in Hellcat engineering was just “make it bigger.” Brakes, cooling systems, tires, suspension components—all bigger. And the result is that a Hellcat sedan weighs 4600+ pounds, and a Hellcat Durango is likely to weigh over three tons.

            I think the lack of competition is more because nobody else has an appropriate platform than because the product was hard to engineer.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            The Hellcats seem to me like an answer to the question “What do we have to do to put a monster supercharged V8 in a car and not have it break in the warranty period” more than “how do we make a satisfying performance car.” The answer to every problem in Hellcat engineering was just “make it bigger.” Brakes, cooling systems, tires, suspension components—all bigger. And the result is that a Hellcat sedan weighs 4600+ pounds, and a Hellcat Durango is likely to weigh over three tons.

            I think the lack of competition is more because nobody else has an appropriate platform than because the product was hard to engineer.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “The answer to every problem in Hellcat engineering was just “make it bigger.” ”

            That’s true, but that’s because they want to meet a certain price point. If you are looking for a lighter weight performance vehicle with more development dollars behind it then Alfa Romeo has you covered. And anyway, what is AMG doing when they *63 something like a GLE?

            “nobody else has an appropriate platform”
            GM has had several over the years but they never really sorted a way to do it.

          • 0 avatar
            stuki

            To a lot of people, “bigger” and “more powerful” is exactly the “performance” they are looking for.

            Along with that endangered/eradicated specie once referred to as non-mediocrity.

            And also, as an American organization catering to Americans, “bigger and more powerful” are features they have a bit of a built in competitive advantage delivering; offering a bot of a respite from the intense competition faced in less America-specific niches.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            To each their own. I find bigger for the sake of bigger boring and unsatisfying. I’d rather have a stick Mustang GT than a Hellcat even if you gave me my choice for free, so I guess I’m just not the target audience.

      • 0 avatar
        wolfwagen

        Ford has the SVT team which really hasnt done anything since 2014.
        GM really has no in house tuning group ( i guess you could say GM performance, but no separate moniker like SRT or SVO)

      • 0 avatar
        wolfwagen

        Ford has the SVT team which really hasnt done anything since 2014.
        GM really has no in house tuning group ( i guess you could say GM performance, but no separate moniker like SRT or SVO)

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      “I don’t know how you possibly could replace a team that thought up the unprecendented, incredibly unique idea of slapping a big supercharger on a big pushrod V8.”

      You can’t do it. For any it. That’s the problem. With Stellantis (goodness gracious, even that they can’t…..). As well as with the dystopian freefall of a society which is the only sort which could have spawned something so monumentally unable to can.

  • avatar
    el scotto

    There was Chrysler and it was good. 426 Hemis and Torqueflight transmission that bowed to no one and made others turn away in shame. Sadly engineering that was equal to any in the world was only part of a company that employed only the most inept to run manufacturing, sales management to let production lines run flat out and then store excess inventory in open lots until retailers were forced to take the “excess production. Then came a loan from the gov’t and said loan was paid back early. A cigar chomping true believer oil and gas coursing through his veins said our new savior will be the K. The K car and it’s 4,392 variants led Chrysler out of the wilderness. Then a box on wheel appeared like manna from heaven. But yeah and verily it still wasn’t enough. The Germans came in and said it was a marriage of equals but we all know who lead that dance. Then came corporate evil in the form of cerebus. They would have sold employees desk for scrap value and told employees to stand if they could have. Then an economic maelstrom struck and what was the hollow shell of a once hallowed company was given to the Italians. By then car aficionados knew there was a difference between the Chrysler, Daimler-Chrysler, and blood sucking cerebus eras. Oh there were some hits along the way but Chrysler ended up being lumped together with some severely average brands. Unlike a former major leaguer signing a minor-league contract in hopes of making it back to the big leagues; Chrysler ain’t. Oh to be sneaking beers and cruising for chicks in my buddy’s Plum Crazy Charger.

  • avatar
    Syke

    Care to go up against my Chevy Bolt at a stoplight before you start mouthing that bull too loudly?

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Pour one out. This group did an amazing job breathing life into some VERY old product.

    And now for the Dodge deathwatch…

  • avatar
    Snooder

    While I think we all expected this, but man I was really hoping they’d be able to get out a Hellcat 300 before the end came.

  • avatar
    Imagefont

    Well damn. Instead of just Hellcatting the Hell out of everything they’ll have to just start building competitive vehicles that people can afford and want to buy.
    Oh wait, they’ve never been able to do that. I guess they’re screwed.

    • 0 avatar
      Flipper35

      I guess no one buys regular Challengers, Chargers, or Durangos?

      If I were to buy a RWD larger car they would be top of the list.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      Noone can do that in America anymore. We debase productive people by printing paper, and make money off our house and kangaroo courts now. The funding of which has been squarely laid on productive individuals and organizations for long enough, that they are all long since priced out of the ability to compete.

  • avatar
    Menar Fromarz

    I can imagine there are legions of dealers gnashing their teeth over this.

  • avatar
    kjhkjlhkjhkljh kljhjkhjklhkjh

    With Mercedes killing v8’s this is not a surprise.

  • avatar

    My bad vibes about this merger have been realized. What basically happened was a French company took over FCA and deliberately weakened it. What other conclusion can you come up with. They took FCA best asset (SRT) and immediately cancelled it. Today FCA is a much weaker company. Maybe that is what they wanted the whole time. Stellantis is living in a fool’s paradise if they think American’s are going to buy rebadged Peugeots.

  • avatar
    MyerShift

    How depressing. Chrysler Corp needs to be liberated and made All-American again.

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