By on February 5, 2021

400Z

In photos obtained by japanesenstalgiccar.com,  the Nissan 400Z prototype is seen with its hood propped open, and there it is, a 400 horsepower, twin-IHI turbocharged, VR30DDTT V6 engine. First available in the Infiniti Q50 sedan, a year later in 2016 it was also in the Q60 coupe in 300 and 400 HP versions.

The VR30DDTT has an aluminum block and cylinder heads, direct-mount turbos with integrated exhaust manifolds to decrease weight, and an electronic wastegate actuator. There’s also a lightweight resin intake and lower oil pan, an electronically-controlled variable-displacement oil pump, and twin water-to-air intercoolers with two water pumps.

400Z

Layerworks, the owner of a NISMO GT-R that was also at the Nissan Crossing showroom in Tokyo’s Ginza district, caught the 400Z prototype while workers were changing the display after hours. It was their familiarity with Nissan and Infiniti engines that led to the identification of the engine as a Q60 400 Red Sport, due to the location of three coolant caps, the shape of a reservoir, and the position of a large coolant hose and smaller reservoir overflow hoses.

400Z

Little by little, information about the 400Z is surfacing, and the level of excitement over its debut continues to build.

400Z

[Images: Nissan]

 

 

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20 Comments on “New Nissan 400Z Spied With Hood Up...”


  • avatar
    jdmcomp

    If they have not improved the design, noise problems, interior, clutch, and overall shodyness then it is dead on delivery.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      While the interior was kind of blah I found it functional in an old school / minimalist kind of way and thus liked it. For a driver focused sports car having a plain interior is not a bad thing. However the noise and heavy clutch (and steering) were real problems. As a daily driver those things get annoying. Hopefully the suspension is updated too because it was bone jarring in my 2003. Quick summary: good track car aside from the weight, but poor daily driver due to compromises.

      I moved onto a C7 which is in a whole different category and manages double duty better then pretty much anything else on the market.

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    Nissan has lost the plot by entering the horsepower wars. The original 240Z and it’s predecessor, the 1600, were inexpensive fun roadsters to drive, and were adequate on freeways.

    This is neither inexpensive nor a fun little roadster/coupe to drive, unless you want bragging rights for 0-60 times. They spent a lot of money for a halo street racer that will have limited production and sky-high insurance/mainenance costs.

    The 1970 240Z sold for $3526 (about $24k today), and they sold over 2000 a month. Those are the ballparks Nissan should be spending development dollars on, not limited production overpriced street rockets.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      2000 sales a month with a $25k MSRP is not going to justify developing a unique lightweight RWD platform. And I have doubts they’ll get 2000 a month in this market.

    • 0 avatar
      theflyersfan

      I get what you’re saying, but in order for Nissan to do what you propose, they would have to devote and develop something like Mazda does with the MX-5 and I don’t think that have it in them to do that. It’s easier and cheaper to pluck parts off of the shelf instead of shaving parts down grams and developing a new chassis just for a lightweight RWD sportscar.

    • 0 avatar
      N8iveVA

      “Nissan has lost the plot by entering the horsepower wars. The original 240Z and it’s predecessor, the 1600, were inexpensive fun roadsters to drive, and were adequate on freeways.”

      If that were the case wouldn’t the BRZ/86 sell better? People expect more horsepower in a world of 300hp Camrys.

      • 0 avatar
        JMII

        I said this before – the Z’s problem was/is occupying the middle ground. Not light enough to be a tossable car like a Miata or 86, yet not powerful enough to hang with V8 Camaros or Mustangs.

        People don’t buy coupes or sports cars these days, so regardless of power or cost sales will never return those golden years.

      • 0 avatar
        Ol Shel

        Exactly. I think that the BRZ twins are the spiritual successors to the original Z.

        I,like too many people, have moved on from everyday cars that can’t also hold a bike, boxes, or supplies. I’d be all excited about a BRZ chassis beneath a GTI or sportwagen body. (Aw, crap. I just found out no more VW wagons…)

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      There were other Z’s besides the 240 and 280 cars that people remember quite fondly. I think there is as much nostalgia among the people still buying new cars for the Z32 cars (1990-96) as any of the older ones and it was a very different car…much closer in spirit to the newer one.

      That is my era as well. A twin turbo V6 in the Z feels right to me.

    • 0 avatar
      gasser

      It very hard to judge what will occur with the 400Z if you are trying to compare it to the 1970 240Z. I had a new ‘73 240Z and had many friends who had the ‘70 to the ‘73 iteration. First, these cars were fast compared to what was available at that time. The competition for your money was mostly Camaro and Firebird and those were pretty much all 350 engines. You could order one with a 400 (I don’t remember exact size) but then GM didn’t have room for the A/C compressor under the hood. The price may have been $3526 list, but by 1973 demand so far exceeded supply that dealers had all sorts of crap add ons, like cheap alloy wheels, chrome bump bars, tire upgrades, that the price was over $5000. Additionally, 1973 was a smog strangled year in California, with the engine output going from 150 to 125, accompanied by overheating and vapor locking with disturbing frequency. My ‘73 came standard with paint overspray and areas of orange peel at no extra charge. The air pump (smog device) ate belts regularly. The biggest hurdle for Nissan to overcome is the SUV. 400Z type sporty vehicles are no longer the emblem of youth and those seeking to recapture youth.
      My point is that 1970 vs. 2021 is a BIG stretch of time and I don’t think that very much of the marketing and sales pattern of the 240Z means anything to Nissan in positioning and selling a 400Z. I really don’t know why they even bothered to develop it.

      • 0 avatar
        indi500fan

        I bought a 73 that was about 10 months old as a dealer demo. Loved the car. A guy at GM Research told me to add a front spoiler for downforce to make it track well on the interstate, and what a difference at 75mph!

        A/C was a US port or dealer add-on for these back in the day, and whoever did the rework to add the compressor drive pulley on the crankshaft damper partially stripped the threads in the crankshaft leading to an expensive problem with things coming loose. I was able to cobble it back together without pulling the engine and traded it (at a robust valuation) on a Camaro.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    The contrasting roof design on this wants to scream lift off targa or t-top.

  • avatar
    John R

    For those who were complaining that the BM-Dupra lacked a manual trans, time to pony up.

    this is, more or less, the Supra with a manual.

  • avatar
    JMII

    This was always the only engine Nissan could put in it that makes sense. And frankly they should have done it years ago. I assume it will share the FM (Q60) platform again. If so it be heavy likely around 3,700lbs.

  • avatar
    Ol Shel

    People who were never in the market for a sports car are lining up on teh interwebz to tell us that if only the new Z had moar of this or less of that (what the hell was Nissan thinking?!) that’d have bought one or two.

  • avatar
    RHD

    The 400Z hood-up picture showed… a big plastic engine cover!

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      They all have that now. What’s behind the curtain, er, under the plastic cover is too complicated, too mysterious, to be messed with by a mere owner of the vehicle, but authorized dealer service only. Officially, though, it’s to keep the engine clean.

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