By on February 17, 2021

2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E

2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E Premium AWD Fast Facts

Permanent-magnet dual electric motors (346 horsepower/428 lb-ft)

Automatic transmission, all-wheel drive

96 city / 84 highway / 90 combined (EPA Rating, MPGe)

2.4 city, 2.8 highway, 2.6 combined. (NRCan Rating, Lₑ/100km)

Base Price: $47,000 (U.S) / $58,745 (Canada)

As Tested: $56,200 (U.S.) / $71,795 (Canada)

Prices include $1,100 destination charge in the United States and $2,000 for freight, PDI, and A/C tax in Canada and, because of cross-border equipment differences, can’t be directly compared.

I’ve been waiting to get my grubby mitts on the steering wheel of the Ford Mustang Mach-E for over a year now.

I spent a good chunk of a weekend learning all about it before the 2019 Los Angeles Auto Show. And I was all set to trek to Detroit to drive it last fall. But, well, COVID travel restrictions forced me to keep my FIB (if you know, you know) self out of Michigan. So we sent friend of the site Chad, since he was unencumbered by such things.

Finally, a scant few months later, the electric Mustang (yeah, I know. It’s on a different platform and I’m on record as not liking the use of the Mustang moniker) graced my garage.

I don’t, as a general rule, read reviews of a car I am scheduled to test before I get my turn. I don’t want to subconsciously prejudice my opinions. But sometimes the chatter can’t be avoided, and in addition to editing Chad’s review, I saw talk about how great the Mach-E is on the social channels. I even had a few journalists tell me that when we’ve talked over text or Zoom.

The truth is, the Mach-E is pretty good. But maybe a tick or two short of great.

Let’s start with the good, which will be good news to most of you – the Mach-E handles well. I wish most small crossovers handled this well. Whether in “engage” mode (balanced driving) or “unbridled” (the sport mode), the Mach-E turned in nicely, with well-weighted steering offering up nice accuracy and heft. There was some understeer when pushed a bit too hard on an off-ramp, though nothing dramatic.

This comes at a cost – in this case, a ride that’s more than a little stiff. Jarring at times, in fact. At least the all-wheel-drive system was sure-footed in the snow that dumped on Chicago during most of my loan.

2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E Premium AWD

Electric vehicles deliver torque pretty much instantaneously, and the Mach-E configured as my tester was – Premium trim with the 88 kWh extended-range battery (376 cells) and dual-motor AWD – puts out 428 lb-ft of twist. That makes for the kind of swift acceleration that brings grins. Ford claims a 0-60 time of 4.8 seconds. The V8 soundtrack is missed, though not as much as you’d expect. If you’re wondering how many ponies this crossover with a pony-car name makes, the answer is 346 (259 kW) in this guise.

You can, of course, set your Mach-E to make propulsion sounds, or not, with the flick of a button on the 15.5-inch touchscreen that dominates the center stack.

2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E Premium AWD

You can also turn one-pedal driving on/off via that same screen (which also controls the drive modes and just about everything else – more on that in a bit). One-pedal driving always takes some getting used to when it has been a while, but it quickly starts to feel natural for urban driving. I did switch it off for about half of the spirited driving I did and for close-quarters maneuvering – the former to better carry speed into a corner when appropriate while keeping things smooth and the latter because leaving the one-pedal mode on causes the Mach-E to come to a stop without any throttle, and sometimes you need idle creep to ease into a parking space.

That aforementioned spirited driving was fit into a tight window of time in which it wasn’t snowing to beat the band, and I held back a bit because the pavement was cold and/or wet. I’d love to spend more time with a Mach-E when the weather is warm and the roads are dry, but my initial take is that it’s a relative joy to drive.

On-road dynamics aside, the cold weather apparently ate into battery range something fierce. Even in my heated garage, which has an ambient temperature of probably around 60 Fahrenheit, the Mach-E didn’t see more than 200 miles of range fully charged. This car had the extended-range battery, which promised 270 miles of range, maximum, in this trim. So either the polar vortex is a range killer, the car’s onboard range estimator is extremely conservative, or the estimator is just really bad. Or some combination thereof.

Ford tells me that it’s also possible the driver-profile wasn’t reset between loans, and that could affect the range estimator.

Charging isn’t fast either, at least not on the three-pin outlets provided by my garage (building management wasn’t sure what voltage, but guessed 110). Ford claims 20-30 miles of charge per hour on a 240-volt outlet with the extended-range battery and rear-wheel drive, and 61 miles of charge in 10 minutes on a DC fast charger in the same configuration, with standard-range batteries going from 10 percent to 80 percent in 45 minutes.

2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E Premium AWD

My own experience showed that my first long charge added 19 percent – from 56 to 75 – over the course of 17 hours and 15 minutes. That gained me 38 miles of range. I had two other long charges – 23 percent over 20 hours and 37 minutes for 55 miles, and 24 percent over more than 43 hours when the snow kept me indoors. Oddly, the FordPass app, which tracks these things, shows no miles added for that last charge, despite the battery going from 76 to 100 percent. Polar vortex at work, possibly.

Driving an EV can change one’s habits due to the search for a charge. For example, my local grocery chain doesn’t offer a charger at the store closest to my house. But a competing chain offered two chargers in its parking garage. So I swung by there, and picked up 2 percent and 3 miles in the 16 minutes I was in the store, fruitlessly searching for familiar staples. Whole Foods brings about a whole-new experience for those of us who usually shop with the hoi polloi.

At least this time the charger worked – this was the very same location where a Jaguar I-Pace failed to pick up any juice.

2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E Premium AWD

Whole Paycheck didn’t have what I wanted or needed, so I did a little Googling to find an outlet of my preferred chain that offered a charger. The search showed another store nearby with a charger in the garage, so I wandered over. This time, I picked up 3 percent and 4 miles in 24 minutes of grocery-getting.

I bring this up because this sort of planning is unnecessary with internal-combustion engines. This isn’t Ford’s fault – increasing charging infrastructure is a massive effort that will take years and the work of many different companies, and all EVs are affected by this – but it’s a reminder that the Mach-E is still subject to the same realities as every Bolt, Leaf, and Tesla.

Circling back to FordPass for a sec, the app is a bit of secondary tech that helps make the Mach-E experience a bit better. The app is offered on other Fords, but it has Mach-E-specific features that I found helpful. I could check on the state of charge from the comfort of home, find chargers, or set it up so that the car charged when electricity rates were lower or to be primed for a specific departure time. Some bugginess aside, the app helped me monitor things from my condo. I could check to make sure it was still plugged in and charging without trekking down to the parking garage, and even estimate when it might be fully charged.

It also lets you use your phone to unlock the car, which came in handy when I needed to grab something out of the vehicle and I didn’t have the key fob handy.

That 15.5-inch center-stack screen is the other notable piece of tech. Just about everything you do, from changing radio stations to setting the climate controls to turning on the steering-wheel and seat heaters, requires you to use the screen. Thankfully, the screen responded quickly to most of my inputs, and it’s pretty easy to find the right menu for the right function. Turning on Apple CarPlay – wireless, here – didn’t mess up the flow, since only the top half of the screen was given over to Apple’s interface. The other controls remained easily accessible below.

Ford claims the touchscreen can learn your habits, but I didn’t notice if it did during a week-long loan in which the Mach-E spent a fair amount of time parked because of the weather.

There was one minor nit – as per usual with Ford, my iPhone and Sync failed to connect on my second trip in the car. That hiccup didn’t occur again during my test.

Mach-E. Image: Ford

With the exception of one large knob for volume, located in the touchscreen, the interior is minimalist, with very few physical buttons. The shifter is also a knob – the hockey-puck style which you lot in the comments have derided before. The dash has a double-sweep look in a subtle nod to the original and current Mustang sports cars, and the materials look nice. Thing is, some of the materials don’t feel upmarket, and I wonder how they’ll hold up to three to five years of abuse. The materials would be fine for the Escape, but at nearly 60 grand, I expected better.

At least the minimalist aesthetic looks cool. Even if the big infotainment screen, as useful as it, does look a bit tacky. The rectangular gauge screen has nice lettering that’s big and clear, but sometimes the steering wheel blocked my view of it.

ford

Headroom and legroom are fine up front, and I found the rear mildly tight for a six-foot-one tester who eats too many Italian beefs. Not cramped, exactly, but not luxurious. Fully grown adults at around or under six feet of height will be fine on short and medium trips, though NBA players will complain about rear headroom.

There’s a front trunk (drainable) if you need it, but the 29.7 cubic feet of cargo space in the hatch (add 30 if you fold down the rear seats) proved plenty for grocery hauling.

Outside, the Mach-E is a looker, far prettier than it appears in pictures. While I don’t like the use of the Mustang name, I am forced to admit its styling evokes its pony-car “sibling.” It’s sleek and avoids any of the geekiness that is often associated with EVs.

The Mach-E also avoids most of the sacrifices required of driving a green car, save for the charging-infrastructure issues faced by all EVs. Unlike a hybrid running terribly performing tires to save fuel or other EVs that allow the battery to eat into interior space.

Indeed, outside of the lack of a grille, the Mach-E wouldn’t be easily identifiable, visually, as an EV.

On a related note, I wonder if Ford can make an ICE-powered crossover on this platform, with one of the EcoBoosts underhood. Maybe even the Coyote V8…

My test unit Premium AWD based at $47,000. The Rapid Red paint job – fast becoming my favorite shade on offer from the Blue Oval – added $400, and the extended-range battery plus AWD is $7,700 (battery is $5K with RWD). With the $1,100 destination fee, the total price rang in at $56,200. A federal tax credit of $7,500 is available.

Standard features included active grille shutters, 19-inch wheels, rain-sensing wipers, LED headlamps, rear spoiler, fixed panoramic glass roof, dual-zone climate control, heated front seats, heated steering wheel, USB, charging cable, Bang & Olufsen audio, Co-Pilot 360 driver-aid tech (adaptive cruise control, lane-keep system, blind-spot information system with cross-traffic, 360-degree camera, lane-centering, evasive-steering assist, pre-collision assist with automatic emergency braking, auto hold, and more), navigation, wireless cell-phone charging, Wi-Fi, push-button starting, and a power liftgate.

MPGe is rated at 96 city/84 highway/90 combined.

Putting aside any fretting about range anxiety or charging for a sec, the Mach-E performs well. It’s fast in a straight line, handles well, and looks good. The penalty you pay is a stiff ride, steep sticker price, and smallish rear-seat room.

So yeah, it’s good, though it needs some tweaks – mainly to cabin materials, and perhaps a reduction in price – to be truly great.

The EV revolution isn’t yet here. But when it comes, the Mach-E stands ready.

[Images © 2021 Tim Healey/TTAC, Ford]

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121 Comments on “2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E Premium AWD Review – Ready for a Revolution That Isn’t Here Yet...”


  • avatar
    Fred

    Just a general comment on all EVs. First, we need a standard charging system. Second, range if you have a drive over 200-300 miles then you are going to have to plan to stop for several hours to recharge. It’s better than it was just a few years ago, but still these need to be fixed before we see mass adoption.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      We are just about here with a single charging standard for non-Tesla vehicles. Nissan has essentially killed Chademo going forward, except in Japan,by announcing their next EV will be CCS the standard used by everyone but Nissan/Mitsubishi.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        Except, get this, there are two CCS standards. We have CCS1 and Europe has CCS2. Ironically, Tesla is probably the more common charging system. Tesla has a CCS2 adapter in Europe, but we haven’t seen a CCS1 adapter here. There might be some third-party adapters out there.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          In Europe Tesla ships Model 3 with CCS2.

          The difference between CCS1 and CCS2 isn’t really a big deal since I doubt many people are going to ship their vehicle between the two places and/or Japan.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    Give it to John Kerry

  • avatar
    ajla

    “the Mach-E didn’t see more than 200 miles of range fully charged.”
    “over the course of 17 hours and 15 minutes. That gained me 38 miles of range”
    “This time, I picked up 3 percent and 4 miles in 24 minutes of grocery-getting.”

    Whew.
    From reading many reviews now, this thing isn’t a disaster but it really doesn’t seem that good either.
    It is fast and handles “well” but the Teslas do that too while also doing the BEV stuff *much* better and offering the supercharger network. Plus, with the Ford you’re still stuck with the “minimalist” interior and goofy door handles so there is no reprieve there.
    Meanwhile GM and H/K offer more conventional ergonomics, lower prices, and better BEV-specific nondynamic performance.

    It really just seems like something for the Blue Oval faithful.

    • 0 avatar
      N8iveVA

      Alex Dykes was going farther than the display says, by quite a bit. Is it just overly pessimistic?

      • 0 avatar
        Tim Healey

        It might be. I wasn’t willing to fuck around and find out, especially during a polar vortex.

        If chargers were more plentiful and faster, I would’ve risked it. But until that day comes…

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          @tim: The trick for pushing further than the display is to know what your power consumption rate is and do the math yourself as you go. Driving a Leaf long distance you learn those tricks quickly. You also have to understand the effect of the terrain when it’s mountainous. The midwest should be easy to figure. Michigan seems to have a lot of chargers these days, so maybe 94 east would be a good bet for range testing. There seems to be a lot of level 3 chargers and loads of level 2 chargers along 94. Actually, you might not even have to make a long trip to figure out the range. Just get the consumption rate numbers and do the math. Maybe highway driving for 30 minutes at the speed limit or maybe a few mph over.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “know what your power consumption rate is and do the math yourself as you go.”

            I mean that works for some people but normies aren’t going to do that. Manufacturers should be investing in providing their customers better data.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            @ajila: I meant that as more of a technique for testing range, but you are right, they do need to provide better data. With the telematics data they have for most roads in the US and their vehicle’s performance, it should be better.

            The funny thing is that in real life with an EV, you really don’t pay much attention to range. Day-to-day, I just don’t come close to exceeding the cars range, so as long as there are no power failure or charging failure alert text messages from the car, you know you have more than enough range to do daily driving. It’s not like a gas car where every time you get into it, you have to figure if you have to stop for gas. No worrying about a gas stop making you late. There’s all of this stress out there over range anxiety on EVs, but if you have at-home charging, it’s really the opposite. I’m going to add solar and a powerwall, so I won’t even worry about power failures. Sure, for long trips you need to pay attention, but for me the trip to the second home is about 120 miles so that isn’t even an issue (even the Leaf makes the trip with a stop). Especially if I get solar and a powerwall there. I do realize that’s not the case for everyone, but if you can do it, fueling at home and always leaving the house is a really great feature to have and maybe the biggest advantage of having an EV.

          • 0 avatar
            Tim Healey

            Two problems there. One: There is a non-zero chance I’d screw up the math. Two: I killed a Leaf once, trying to stretch it, in part because a charger didn’t work.

    • 0 avatar
      Add Lightness

      Level 3 charging is the equivalent of Telsa’s supercharging network without all the proprietary nonsense.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        “Level 3 charging is the equivalent of Telsa’s supercharging network without all the proprietary nonsense.”

        That’s cool. There needs to be more of them though. Right now I would pass a lot of Tesla chargers on my way to the nearest level 3 station.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          Around here I pass a lot of EA Level 3 chargers before I find a Tesla Supercharger and most of those Super Chargers are 72kw units while the base EA units are 50 kw units with 350 kw units at select locations but 150kw seems to be the most common. Meanwhile half or so of the Tesla locations around here are destination chargers running between 8kw and 12 kw, in other words Level 2.

          I pulled up maps of locations of each covering the greater Seattle area and this is what I found

          EA 19 Live, 12 coming soon/under construction
          Tesla Super Chargers 11 Destination chargers 12

          Note many of those Superchargers do have more units per location so they may have more chargers total.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            YMMV. The nearest EA station to me is in Ormond beach. It has 5 CCS plugs and 1 CHAdeMO. I’d have to go all the way to Orlando for the next one.

            Meanwhile there are 3 Tesla Supercharger locations on the way to the one in Ormond. 26 total plugs, 20 are 250kw, 6 are 120kw.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            EA does seem to have FL covered pretty well, even if not in your particular area.

            Of course chargers near home aren’t really the point since most people will only use public chargers when venturing farther away from home.

            But the point is you can’t make a blanket statement on charger availability for the entire US since it does vary greatly.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “But the point is you can’t make a blanket statement on charger availability for the entire US since it does vary greatly.”

            That’s true but what’s the current numbers of supercharger plugs vs the current numbers of EA plugs? I think it is about 10:1. If you pick a random population center in the US what are the odds Tesla won’t be the most frequent offering?

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Yes Tesla still outnumbers EA overall but EA is still expanding pretty rapidly and they are but one public network.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            EA is going to have more competition soon. Shell is planning another half-million chargers. At some point, it will be tougher to find a gas pump than a charger. Especially if gas station owners are making more per plug than per pump when EVs become more common. Range anxiety will be worse for ICE because you’ll never know if the pump that worked last week is still there this week.

            https://techcrunch.com/2021/02/11/planning-500000-charging-points-for-evs-by-2025-shell-becomes-the-latest-company-swept-up-in-ev-charging-boom/

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Yeah I think my closest supercharger is an hour away. Not to mention to service a Tesla it has to make a 2 hour haul to Nashville.

            There are chargers locally (I drive an early Leaf on occasion so I know where the chargers are), but the really fast ones are few and far between.

            I feel like a unified standard and maybe some assistance with the build out of a high speed charging network would go a long way towards mass adoption.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            Maybe dumb luck but the supercharger network today is laid out in such a way that a Model 3 LR could be my only car. What’s holding me back is just that I dislike the “Teslaness” of the car (door handles, weird interior, being at the mercy of Elon’s whims)

            Now if Uncle Sugar starts offering $7500 subsidies on them again, I’ll have to really think about it.

    • 0 avatar
      Wheatridger

      “My own experience showed that my first long charge added 19 percent – from 56 to 75 – over the course of 17 hours and 15 minutes. That gained me 38 miles of range. I had two other long charges – 23 percent over 20 hours and 37 minutes for 55 miles, and 24 percent over more than 43 hours when the snow kept me indoors.”

      That’s a horrible charging performance! Less than 1% recharge per hour? Thirty-eight miles in 17 hours? My C-Max Energi gains 15-20 miles of range in five hours, from a standard AC circuit. There’s no way to see this as progress.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    When the revolution finally gets here it will probably coincide with the time I’ll be ready to give up my ICE for something all electric. Despite the name I like the way this looks and your review is promising. We’ll see, between this and my current Escape there’s a Bronco Sport on my short list, so the timing should be about right

    • 0 avatar

      Revolution is already here if you did not notice and you will give up you ICE car very soon.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        You’d be surprised how cheap it is to operate ICE cars even when fuel is expensive when you own them outright. There is some math there that is hard to overcome. And contrary to popular belief, EVs are not zero maintenance vehicles…though many I know that believe this nonsense also treated their ICE vehicles as zero maintenance so I’m not shocked at this thought. The math makes sense for a 19 year old’s beater. I need a bit more from my cars.

        I’ll jump on the EV train (all in anyway, we have one in the family for the kid to go back and forth to local college in) when the math makes sense, the charging infrastructure is built out In my area, and I can service it locally.

        • 0 avatar
          Daniel J

          Art,

          I live in the same area you do, you you’ve expressed my sentiments exactly.

          Is there any chance that in the next 5 years to get charging stations out on base at a significant level? Probably not.

        • 0 avatar
          jkross22

          Art, My 14 year old 3 series needs about $1500 in maintenance and repairs/year, including tires, brakes, oil changes, etc. Doesn’t include fuel.

          But get this – even in So Cal where power is pricey (.22/kw), it costs roughly half to keep an EV fueled per year. When gas is $3.70/gallon, that adds up.

          Factor in tire life for EVs being only 60-70% of ICE tire life, you’re still coming out ahead with an EV to keep it fueled and with tires. Add in the maintenance cost of an ICE as it ages, and the EV argument makes more financial sense in the long run.

          Yeah, small things still break – ac compressors, switches and electrical stuff, but over the last 3 years, the cost of repairing oil leaks of every variety has cost me a few grand all in.

          EVs are cheaper to operate.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “EVs are cheaper to operate.”

            Comparing to a 14 year old BMW isn’t exactly the common move. Compare the lifetime costs of a ’21 Model 3 Standard to something like a ’21 Camry hybrid XSE and things get tighter.

            Consumer Reports put together a big dataset last year and they found that (properly used) PHEVs are actually a little cheaper to operate than a BEV. They theorize this is because Teslas and Leafs break too much. So even those “small things” can add up.

            (page 11)
            https://advocacy.consumerreports.org/
            wp-content/uploads/2020/10/EV-Ownership
            -Cost-Final-Report-1.pdf

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Once batteries get cheap enough for purchase price parity, EV cost of operation is going to be lower than ICE has ever been, with the size of the advantage depending on local power cost.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “Once”

            Probably. But “once” is not today.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        Inside Looking Out

        they don’t know the smell of revolution. The 1905 had been going on. Who cares?

        • 0 avatar

          They will. Some folks need an education, don’t give up, or we’ll loose the nation. You say we need a revolution? It seems to be the only solution.

          • 0 avatar
            Old_WRX

            They don’t know the revolution is here. Neither the NYT nor CNN announced it. So, how would they know? It’s the old frog in water slowly coming to a boil thing. If they were paying any attention then it would be impossible to avoid noticing that the good ol’ US of A is getting more and more totalitarian by the day. But, never underestimate the power of denial.

      • 0 avatar
        RHD

        Yep. Joe Biden is on is way to your house to tow away your internal combustion vehicles.
        That is scheduled for the first working day after Barack Obama comes to take away your firearms.
        But first, you have to send in your contribution to the (very corrupt) NRA to make sure this doesn’t happen. (You can donate your savings account to the Orange Man’s re-election campaign, too, if that makes you feel better about your paranoia.)

        • 0 avatar
          Clifford Montana

          You’re a liberal fool. Gas is almost $3.00 a gallon in Michigan, and during Trump’s presidency it was usually aound $1.80 and sometimes up to around $2. Gas prices have risen over 40% in ONE month because of Biden and his liberal policies. But he has two 747s to fly around in. You see, liberal elites think they are more important than regular folk, and they prove this every day. High gas prices hurt lower middle class working folk the most, the EXACT people the liberals are supposed to care about the most. It’s such a scam. You’ve fallen for it. I can’t stand liberals.

  • avatar
    N8iveVA

    I love a nice panoramic roof, but not if it doesn’t open. Does it at least have a retractable shade. The tesla Model Y doesn’t and that would be a deal breaker for me.

  • avatar
    Add Lightness

    Range anxiety has caused many E cars to become grossly heavy.
    If the lightweight versions of cars with aluminum panels or carbon parts becoming the most valuable over time is any guide, I wonder if the shorter range, much lighter (read sprint version) E cars will be the most collectable.
    Why don’t I see the lightweight versions being held in higher esteem even if it means 20 minutes at 50 kw in the middle of a drive (very) occasionally.

    • 0 avatar
      Johnnyangel

      This is really a key observation. Recent studies have shown that the particulate emissions from tires and brakes are up to 1,000 times greater than what comes out of an ICE car’s tailpipe (yes, really — Google it) and the heaviness of electric cars is intensifying these emissions.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        One does wonder where all those worn tire treads go…as somebody who lives near a fairly busy road, the white window sills of the house get filthy dirty with black dust over a few months…something I never saw growing up on a secluded multi-acre lot…

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    Given that certain states can’t reliably deliver power during adverse weather events or even normal days, I question whether everyone needs to move to EVs. Our electrical infrastructure needs upgrading regardless.

    Meanwhile, I’m of the mind that there’s still plenty of room to be made with hybrids.

    My friend’s 2016 RX 450h AWD is rated for 29 MPG and routinely does 32+, on regular fuel (even though it’s rated for premium). And it’s only about a $1,500 premium over the RX 350 AWD. And it’s not even slow.

    I was also checking out the new F-150 Hybrid, which averages something like 25 MPG. That’s pretty incredible, for something that capable.

    And then there’s stuff like the Corolla Hybrid, Prius, Insight and Elantra Hybrid, which hit the 50+ MPG range.

    As for the Mach-E, it’s something I would buy. I don’t really care that it’s called a Mustang; I just know that it looks a lot prettier than either the Bolt EUV or the Model Y, and is more usable than the XC40 Recharge.

    • 0 avatar
      Add Lightness

      I would like to see E cars have the ability to be a 10 or 20 kw UPS.
      That would nicely compensate for any Electrical grid anxiety.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      “No power means no juice for EVs” is a valid point. But if the power’s out, then so are the gas pumps down at the Kum-and-Go, so a car with a bone-dry gas tank is just as hosed as a dead-battery Tesla.

      (Found this fact of life out the hard way during a huge storm that knocked the power out, by the way. I rolled into a gas station with a bone-dry tank, and the pumps were kaput. The good news that was the roof over the pumps protected my car from the hail, so I just waited until the juice was back on.)

      • 0 avatar
        JMII

        “But if the power’s out, then so are the gas pumps down at the Kum-and-Go”

        As a FL native that deals with hurricanes I’ve learn to fill the tank before the storm hits for this very reason.

        And yes hybrids are still the best option, my brother’s E-Hybrid Cayenne gets around 70 MPG in real world usage. He would charge at work and home, then only use gas for the last few miles of his commute. As long as it recharges in about 6 hours its fine for daily commuter duty. His best tank yielded 123 MPG due lots of short, local trips. In those conditions the gas engine pretty much never fires up.

      • 0 avatar
        Daniel J

        This isn’t always true. When we had an EF5 tornado take out the main lines from the nuclear power station, many gas stations had their pumps running on backup generators.

      • 0 avatar
        Dan

        In a state wide catastrophe, sure, but that’s a once in decades thing. The usual summer storms and winter ice rarely put the paved over areas out at all and when they do those are the first in line to get fixed. Sub and exurbia with above ground lines, trees, and a handful of customers per break is what takes the rest of the week to put back together.

    • 0 avatar
      DC Bruce

      This. The new Sienna, which is hybrid only, is rated at 35 mpg city and highway. Alex Dykes got better than that. The Sienna will carry 6 passengers in a lot more comfort than your friend’s Lexus (even if it’s the L model). Yes, it’s probably a little slow to 60 and yes, when the 4 cyl ICE is working hard, it’s a little rough and noisy (show me a 4 with a displacement greater than 1.5 liters that isn’t). The only reason I can think of that hybrids are not pushed harder by governments is that Toyota and Ford seem to have the only really decent hybrid system and, of course, it’s patented. Honda’s hybrid system can, under some circumstances (like when the battery’s depleted on a long upgrade) be wildly inefficient, because using an ICE to drive a generator to power an electric drive motor is much less efficient than using that ICE to power the car directly.

    • 0 avatar
      Syke

      Keep in mind that with the power out, damn few Texans are refueling their ICE cars. Little matter of gas pumps running on electricity?

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        Texas is a victim of its own desire to have its own electrical grid that is not connected to any other grid. It gives the state the ability to keep the Feds out of their power generation, but it eliminates the ability to “import” power when need spikes. Hot weather states, for the most part, use resistance heat as a “chill chaser” for heat and when you are combating real winter weather, that becomes an enormous load. Couple that with generation equipment that can’t handle cold and you can see why Texas is in deep trouble at the moment. And for the record, Texas is about 10% renewable power, which means that most of their generating difficulties are not due to frozen wind turbines. All of the state’s generation stations (fossil fuel and renewable) are suffering in the cold, and that is due to poor design and diddly regulatory oversight.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          The Texas situation is a fine use case to study on the feasibility of mass EV.

          -Extreme cold and accumulation.
          -Power grid limits and chokepoints.
          -Many home electric heating/heating pumps vs nat gas.
          -Wind turbines literally froze.
          -Solar panels and farms likely did not return much power.
          -Nat gas retail demand made nat gas electric plants compete with retail in a domino effect.

          “While ice has forced some turbines to shut down just as a brutal cold wave drives record electricity demand, wind only comprises 25% of the state’s energy mix this time of year. The majority of outages overnight were plants fueled by natural gas, coal and nuclear, which together make up more than two-thirds of power generation during winter.

          “The wind is not solely to blame,” said Wade Schauer, research director of Americas power and renewables at Wood Mackenzie. He estimates that about 27 gigawatts of coal, nuclear and gas capacity is unavailable, in part because the cold has driven up demand for natural gas for heating. “That’s the bigger problem.””

          https://fortune.com/2021/02/16/texas-power-outage-frozen-wind-turbines/

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            Texas is due to incompetent politicians that didn’t spend the money to winterize.
            https://www.texastribune.org/2021/02/17/texas-power-grid-failures/

            “Power grid limits and chokepoints.” Isolating themselves from the National Grid was pure stupidity. Again, they didn’t winterize.

            “Wind turbines literally froze.”
            That’s because they ignored the warnings and didn’t install the winterization kits. There are countries operating wind turbines above the arctic circle. We have them in the northeast. It’s interesting that wind power has climbed to 24 or 25%. There are new turbines that put out up to 15mw. Along with that, they need to add grid storage systems.

            “in part because the cold has driven up demand for natural gas for heating. “That’s the bigger problem.”

            That wasn’t the problem. The problem with the natural gas system was frozen equipment, not increased demand:

            https://www.texastribune.org/2021/02/16/natural-gas-power-storm/

          • 0 avatar
            Daniel J

            mcs,

            I believe much of the finger pointing here has to do simply because it is Texas. If this is California, no one would be looking. It would be ignored. I mean, they have rolling blackouts all the time. Their system causes fires.

            I guarantee you that if where I live, this event happened, we’d be in the same situation. Most of my power is nuclear with some hydro. Hydro might not freeze over, but could. I believe though with the type of temperatures that Texas experienced, our nuclear plant would shut down because water would freeze and sensors would freeze. And we get temperatures colder more frequently than even Texas does, even living in a southern state.

            We lost power due to tornadoes affecting the nuclear station. For days. Some for weeks. Granted, we did not have low temps like Texas during that time.

            Based on this whole “winterization” argument, All power plants should still deliver power even getting hit by a tornado, correct? All power plants should survive earthquakes and Tsunamis, correct? When half the state of Florida was out of power due to Irma, I sure didn’t see everyone saying to fix their grid and they failed to “Hurricane proof” their grid.

        • 0 avatar
          RHD

          Don’t mess with Texas! We kin mess with ourselves jes’ fine without no Yankees helpin’ us ta do it!

    • 0 avatar
      Wheatridger

      Wise words, Kyree, as always. Just when I think this site is lost to fanboys and trolls, you show me a little ray of light.

      Hybrids are an ideal solution for this awkward transitional period between gas and electric propulsion. My Ford plug-in hybrid acts as an EV on neighborhood shopping trips and a long-legged highway cruiser for long ones, where the car regularly gets 40+ mpg and 600 miles per tankful. The car isn’t hogging a huge battery for the majority of days when I don’t drive beyond battery range, or when I don’t drive at all. I really believe that Lithium and other battery stuffs should be utilized in commercial and government fleets that are driven all day, rather wasted in commuter cars.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      If I was going to buy a boring automatic new something or other, it would certainly be a hybrid, because why not?

      But I am not. I did recently buy another boring automatic used Volvo wagon though, for relative peanuts.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    “Charging isn’t fast either, at least not on the three-pin outlets provided by my garage (building management wasn’t sure what voltage, but guessed 110).”

    Seriously? I’m going to assume this Condo was in the US or Canada? So if it looked just like those outlets that you plug things like your computer, TV, lamp, toaster ect into then it is ~110v. Sure if we were talking about Grand Pa’s shop that he built from scrounged materials then who knows if it was done right.

    Also most free chargers are a lower end Level 2 unit, since they are giving away the electricity they are usually a 240v 24a unit. The Mach-E can do 240v 48a, if connected to a suitable EVSE. So those free chargers are about 1/2 as fast as you can charge at home, if you invest in the right equipment and put it on a 60a circuit.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      As you’re the resident Ford expert, what do you think of that new E-Transit?

      I think it was a smart idea, personally.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Yeah I think it is smart, but I also think they should have brought it to market by now. Sure it isn’t glamorous but fact is there is no segment of vehicle that has anywhere as near a percentage of units on fixed routes or limited operation areas.

        Fact is hardly any are sold to consumers. They get used to deliver things, often to a limited area, get used as shuttles for hotels, senior centers, special need transportation buses ect. Many are also used in the building trades and again they have a limited area that they normally cover.

        All of those vehicles typically return to the same location every night, or maybe several times per day in the case of something like a hotel/senior center shuttle.

        In other words a perfect application for an EV, and for a number of those organizations being “green” would be seen as a good PR move.

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        “… what do you think of that new E-Transit?

        I think it was a smart idea, personally.”

        Range is comically low. The Transit Mach-E is more of a novelty than anything. Why Ford would make a novelty van is beyond me.

    • 0 avatar
      Add Lightness

      Very few cars have more than a 6.6 kw onboard charger for 240v. Bypassing the onboard charger is why level 3 DC is so much faster.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        True that 6.6kw was the most common used in the past but many of the newer crop of EVs have larger units the Mach-E for example is 11kw. Still that pales in comparison to the 110/150kw possible, depending on the battery, with the right DC unit.

    • 0 avatar
      Tim Healey

      Not an option for me. Old building, old garage. If I ever move to a single-family home, I’m going to get a charger installed. But my situation illustrates that no matter how good any one EV is, charging infrastructure has a LONG way to go.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        “…charging infrastructure has a LONG way to go.”

        Yes, it does. And this, I think, explains why the luxury segment is the first one to see solid volume sales of EVs – folks who can afford luxury cars tend to live in houses with garages, where they can charge up overnight, just like they do with their phones. If that’s the situation, then 200 mile range is really not a problem at all – most folks just don’t drive that much in a day.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        Electricity doesn’t care. Old equipment can work just as good. And every garage/house/location has 240v in the breaker box.

  • avatar
    here4aSammich

    I suspect the telematics in your Edge Mach-E (the proper name IMO) knew where the car was. That’s probably why you were getting that range estimate. It was likely correct given how cold it was. A 40% loss isn’t an issue for someone who doesn’t drive much, and never leaves town. But for those of us who do drive 15k yer and like road trips, a 40% loss in winter, combined with the time it takes to charge is a huge issue.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      One thing to keep in mind is that cold weather operation is one of those cases where short trips does increase consumption. The heaters will have a large initial draw to bring things up to temp quickly but that will taper off to maintain the temp. The other thing to keep in mind is that heating load is time, not distance based. So if you do an hour of local driving averaging say 30 mph you’ll use the same amount of electricity to keep warm as you would if you were on the freeway doing 60 mph for that hour.

      In other words you “pay by the hour” for the heat so the impact on range is highly dependent on what type of driving you are doing and in this case it favors longer trips and higher average speeds.

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    It took my forever to figure out how large (well, small) this car was because all of the press shots cleverly hid its proportions by failing to put in near something which could give proper context. Would it be possible to park future vehicles next to another vehicle that is fairly well-known to get an idea of its size? My read on this is that it’s roughly the size of a Focus hatchback.

    Otherwise, the article was interesting even if I’d not buy one.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    “So either the polar vortex is a range killer, the car’s onboard range estimator is extremely conservative, or the estimator is just really bad. Or some combination thereof.”

    It’s the cold weather. You can expect a 25-50% range loss, depending on how cold it is.

    As for 110V charging – it’s not worth it, unless it’s a one-time thing. In 5 years of EV driving, I’ve used 110V once. Pretty much every EV will fill at 2-4 mph at that voltage. All BEV buyers should just get a 240 charger.

    As for Level 2 (240V) charging, it will be slower in cold weather. Those published fill times don’t account for that. Batteries don’t like to be fast-charged when they’re freezing.

    • 0 avatar
      Tim Healey

      Yup, but there is no fast charger where I live. I could’ve left it at the nearest Whole Foods, but it was unclear if I could leave it without risking a tow (I think they exempt EVs from being towed if you leave, I think I left the I-Pace alone, but I didn’t want to find out the hard way) and walked home in the cold, but that is less convenient than letting it gain 3 mph while I watched TV and stayed warm.

      If I ever move to a place that allows me to install a charger, I will do it.

      And yeah, it probably was the weather. But the car was parked indoors, and the garage, while chilly, is still much warmer than the subzero temps outside.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    “ Circling back to FordPass…”

    Going for that press secretary position huh?

    As for Fords electric SUV, it’s just that; another electric vehicle that proves how ineffective they are at replacing ICE vehicles.

    And Ford would never do anything smart like put a proper engine like the 5.0 V8 in the electric SUV. Heck they won’t even put a proper engine in the Wrangler clone that is taking forever to release.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Nice piece, Tim.

  • avatar
    TheEndlessEnigma

    This thing is nothing more than a wild rabid boar with lipstick and eyeshadow.

    This rush to electric cars (Ford Europe) is going to nothing more than drive up the cost of electricity to skyrocket(how the hell are you going to generate it when the environazis won’t allow any form of power generation to be built) and create a hella strong ICE repair market to keep aging ICE powered vehicles on the road – Cause I don’t want an electric car, I’m not buying an electric car cause fuck you.

    Until electric cars have ranges between 400 – 600 miles (competitive with current ICE vehicles) and can be rapidly charged (no, I’m not going to sit on my hands for 2 – 3 hours waiting for a recharge after I ran out of electricity) the electric car rage will not be a consumer driven rage.

    If you want electric vehicles to be a valid choice:
    -real range is needed.
    -realistic pricing is needed
    -realistic charge times are needed

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      You know, I would almost rather have a lighter EV…something like the Mini E with 120 miles or so of range and the ability to recharge it in 20-30 minutes (all over, not just in certain places) than an extra 400 miles of capacity I use a couple times a year. Even the performance EVs are closer in weight to my F150 than my sports cars and that matters in the sort of driving I enjoy.

      I suppose I am a minority, but it seems silly to pay for all that battery I’m barely going to use but will notice every time I hit a twisty road.

      These sorts of cars will be the “forbidden fruit” Euro hot hatches that I grew up wanting but couldn’t buy here. Such a car makes sense there.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        YMMV. I drive distance much more often than I drive on “twisty roads”. I don’t need 600 miles but even with ubiquitous charging I really would want at least 300 miles.

        Hopefully the future market will cater to both groups.

  • avatar

    Live in LA and have to park on the street. Makes it kinda hard to get that 240v charger for overnight charging.In the area I live the streets are packed w/cars overnight.

  • avatar
    redapple

    Increased weight of driver
    caused by
    Too many Italian Beef
    caused by
    Too many dam Portillos !!!!!!!!!!!

    LOVE that place.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    I don’t understand why so few reviewers of EVs ever have access to L2 charging. The fact is that the right buyer for an EV at this point is one who has, or can easily get, a L2 charger at their home parking spot (whether garage, driveway, or assigned parking garage spot). That describes a large majority of the American public. Publications should, where their reviewers’ situations allow, be fronting the very minor expense of equipping those reviewers with home L2 chargers. Otherwise, EV reviews (like this one) tell us very little about the cars themselves and a whole lot about how inconvenient public charging infrastructure still is. That’s interesting but it is not why we are reading a review of a specific EV.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Well this particular reviewer apparently lives in a Condo in an older building so it may just not be feasible to cost effectively install the required wiring. Then there is the whole question of getting it approved by the Condo association. Not saying that can’t be done because it is done. Back in 2015 I sold a unit in a downtown Seattle building that had been built right before the crash. My client noted how one of the people in the building did go through the process of getting it approved by the association and had the equipment installed to charge his Leaf. It did require a separate meter since it wasn’t practical to tie it into the meter for his unit which were on the unit’s respective floors.

  • avatar
    ConBrio

    I made the jump to an EV as a commuter, and I can attest to the fact that 110v charging is pretty much a non-starter, especially in the greater Los Angeles area. Unless your commute is short (i.e. no freeway – mileage drops precipitously above 65 mph). I was commuting from my house in Ventura County to my station in West LA (42 miles door to door), leaving it plugged in (110v) for my 24 hour shift, then driving home (it would typically be charged by 8pm or so). Now I am on a temporary assignment where I work 5 days a week, and my daily commute is about the same, but without a level 2 charger (cost me $750 or so installed) I would not be able to keep up.

    The tradeoff is that the car was a steal (after rebates paid $22k OTD), the instant torque is hard to lay off of (my previous commuter was a 1993 Accord wagon), and when more things go electric, I will have a better idea of how my family’s lifestyle fits into the BEV environment. With 4 kids, we certainly aren’t doing family jaunts in it, we have a Nissan passenger van for that, but for trips to and fro with the 2 big kids, or a date night, a BEV commuter is pretty fun, provided you can recover your charge overnight somehow.

  • avatar
    Norman Stansfield

    “I wonder if Ford can make an ICE-powered crossover on this platform, with one of the EcoBoosts underhood. Maybe even the Coyote V8…”
    I have the same thought, but GM using the Alpha platform to build a LS powered crossover called the SS.

  • avatar
    MKizzy

    There are tons of comments on EV enthusiast websites from readers who are rabidly predicting a quick death to ICE vehicles, but its an unrealistic proposition in the short term.

    Yes, its nice that EV’s are fast, allegedly reliable, and can be kept charged at home, but barring major government intervention or a huge advance in battery technology (like Toyota’s rumored solid state battery) which would allow EVs to reliably match the 300+ plus mile driving range and < 10 minute recharge/refueling times of ICE vehicles EVs will max out as niche vehicles maintaining a moderate but stable percentage of the vehicle market. Else, all the public charging ports in the world won’t make a big difference to the average working class vehicle owner who must rely on his/her primary vehicle to be suitable in nearly any situation from running about town to driving several hundred miles to evacuating a region under a hurricane warning.

  • avatar
    Tele Vision

    “…turn on the steering wheel…”

    What?!

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      turn on the steering-wheel *heater* (and seat heater)

      EV’s are the ‘one’ vehicle where we can finally get steering-wheel heaters on lower-level trims. (It’s because ‘early’ EV drivers were tired of freezing, and adding a steering-wheel heater was a much lower current drain than using resistance heat to warm the air in the cabin [now a heat pump is generally used]… but it is a good thing regardless.)

      [Steering-wheel heater costs the OEM something like $25 – resistance wire in the steering wheel, fuse, switch, wiring harness, done. The fact that steering-wheel heaters are only offered on upper trim levels is just extortion.]

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    Haven owned my 2013 Volt for 4 years this March I’ve come to a few realizations concerning EV’s. When I’m done w/Volt I’ll definitely go w/BEV. Hoping for Cadillac to come up w/something sexy that I can pick up for dirt used like I did with my little Chevy.

    1st – They are not ready to replace an ICE. The technology just isn’t there yet. As a 2nd or 3rd vehicle in a multi-car household they are almost a no brainer. For me, 98% of the time I leave my home an EV like the Ford would get the job done. For the other 2% I’ve got the ‘Hoe. It will be towing my enclosed snowmobile trailer this weekend about 400 miles(one way) from Minneapolis to Calumet MI in winter weather. Good luck making that trip with any EV available now or in the next 5 years. FYI – No place to plug-in once I reach my destination. Like I said EV’s are long way from replacing ICE vehicles.

    2nd – If you don’t your own home where you can plug-in to a level 2 charger they are not for you.

    3rd – Charging infrastructure in metropolitan areas and surrounding suburbs is completely unnecessary. The beauty of an EV is you charge it at home and you don’t fuel like an ICE, so get the “takes too long to charge” paradigm out of your head and understand the reality is charging times are a non-issue. Unless your road tripping, but then you’re better off just taking the ICE vehicle and leaving the EV at home.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      I agree with most of this, but “they are not ready to replace an ICE” is not true for everyone. At least before COVID, I knew plenty of urban dwellers who flew any time they went anywhere outside the metro area. An EV would do just fine as an only car for those people.

      But honestly the EV vanguard in most of America needs to start with everyone’s second and third cars. Lots of households would find life harder without one gas car, but very few need two or more gas cars. We have one hybrid and one EV, and we’ve never had a reason to charge the EV anywhere except home, even though it gets driven on many more days than the hybrid.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        “I agree with most of this, but “they are not ready to replace an ICE” is not true for everyone’

        @ dal2040 – I’ll agree with that. The intent of that comment was aimed at the fact that EV’s still have limits in certain situations that ICE vehicles do not, hence my example of my trip to MI.

    • 0 avatar
      el scotto

      @ Carlson Fan Sir, has anyone counted the number of residences where a level 2 charger can be installed? That’s where EV marketing needs to focus. Whole Paycheck & some Wallyworlds have chargers.Perhaps Kroger will be next? Ya gotta buy food might as well charge the electric beastie. No one making EVs has came up with the equivalent of a V-8 Ford, Small Block Chevy, or BMW inline-6. Whoever comes up with the “damn just gotta have one of those” EV power-train will win the EV lottery. Now match the gotta have power-train with tasteful styling and you’ll have a hit. Bonus round with two QOTD’s: 1. Who makes the best looking EV -cough- prettiest pig contest -cough- and who makes the ugliest EV? About all of them would be contenders in the ugliest EV contest.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Tesla is about to start selling what they claim is the quickest production car that has ever been sold. They’ve sold the quickest sedan for several years already. I’m not usually a Tesla fan, but… what more than that would it take for an EV powertrain to be “gotta have it?”

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        “Now match the gotta have power-train with tasteful styling and you’ll have a hit.”

        Agree. For my eyes VW(and Audi) make some really nice looking cars. They deliver an EV with some cutting edge tech wrapped in nice looking sheet metal within the next 5 years I’ll be giving that a look.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      No you do need some charging in the Metro and Suburban areas for road trips, it may be local to you but visitors and those passing through will need a charge.

  • avatar
    peeryog

    Why do EV’s seem to need those massive disconnected screens? It looks like you ‘accidentally’ walked out of McDonalds with one of their digital signage boards and now you can sit in comfort and directly order fries and a chocolate shake.

  • avatar
    Syke

    To put things in perspective regarding charging: Mass market, 50 state EV’s have been available for ten years now. Hit up the PlugShare app to see available charging spots.

    Compare that to ICE powered cars, which became available in 1903 (Curved Dash Olds, Model A Ford, with the Model T available in 1908). Yet the first (count ‘em, one) gas station came along in 1915,

    Which meant that for twelve years, early adopters to the automobile had to find a drug store that would sell them a couple of gallons of gasoline.

    I think we’re doing pretty good.

    • 0 avatar
      Maxb49

      “I think we’re doing pretty good.”

      Er…not exactly. I understand the advantages of electric propulsion(torque availability, simplified mechanics) but the reality is there are significant limitations to the technology – notably, range and charging time – that have inherent physical limitations.

      If EV propulsion is done with hydrogen, it’s game over for the internal combustion engine. Until then, I have to make long trips for work every week and I do not have time to sit around waiting for a lithium ion battery pack to recharge (and deteriorate with every charge).

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    I hate those screens. When BEVs have a normal interior I will become interested. This interior would be a deal breaker at any price or performance metric. Too bad since it is a fairly handsome car on the outside.

  • avatar
    rudiger

    A word on earlier comments concerning EV charging infrastructure. Even when it does become widespread (Tesla Superchargers, Electrify America, Shell gas stations, etc.), the elephant in the room becomes cost. Anyone with an EV who has actually had to regularly use a pay charge system has found this out the hard way, with a cost that (generally speaking) far exceeds the equivalent price to travel on a gallon of gas. While there are exceptions, most EV pay charge stations are a RIP-OFF (in capital letters), whether they charge by kWh (the proper way) or by time. Hopefully, it’s just due to sheer incompetence and the pricing structure will come down to something much more reasonable in the not too distant future.

    As to home charging, this is one area where I have to admit GM has done something admirable by including the cost of a Level 2 home charger with the purchase of the latest Bolt EV and EUV. That is, if they can pull it off without the usual machinations associated with anything good GM promises to do.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      People overpricing things is the sort of problem that competition tends to solve. Rates will become reasonable as public chargers become more common. You’ll still pay a substantial premium over home charging at utility rates but the amount won’t be stupid.

      • 0 avatar
        rudiger

        While it’s still rare, I’ve seen a few instances where an EV charge station owner did a good job of pricing.

        For example, in an area where the residential electricity cost is $0.115/kWh, I saw one station that was charging $0.08/kWh.

        Of course, there were plenty others that were pricing at $0.30/kWh (or more).

  • avatar
    Clifford Montana

    I don’t understand why there is a huge push for EVs when the future has been staring us in the face for about two decades. Hybrids are the damn future! The earth, and parts of Canada more specifically, has hundreds of years of oil left, but it is a good idea to reduce oil consumption as costs come down for battery technology. I say that as a conservative who has two pickup trucks and believe we the people should be able to drive what we want. I hate that GM is abandoning all gas powered vehicles and they deserve the death that it will cause them. Put the f-150 hybrid powertrain in a vehicle a size or two bigger than this and you have a REAL option for people across our great country, whether they live in the country or city, whether they live in cold climates or warm. It’s so simple I can’t believe these people who run the car companies can’t see it. Rant over.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      There’s nothing to stop you from driving what you want. A friend of mine recently imported a Trabant. If he could get that thing on the road, you can get just about anything.

      Auto companies have to plan for the future, and that means predicting where technology will be a decade away. At the beginning of next year, we’ll see at least 3 high-end EVs with over 500 miles range. Today, there are 400+ mile EVs. Those cars are expensive now, but those ranges will be at the low end ten years from now. New electrode coatings and improved gravimetric density will cut costs and reduce charging times. Shell just announced they’re installing a half-million charging stations and others will follow. I think that ten years from now we’ll see range-anxiety flip from EVs to ICE as gas pumps start disappearing from the scene. In ten years, people are not going to want to haul around an unneeded complex lump of iron around wherever they go. In ten years, hybrids will have zero advantages over EVs and will probably cost much more. The automakers have to do what Kodak, Polaroid, and Baldwin locomotive failed to do and that requires taking a close look at where technology is headed. And ICE range anxiety is coming and sooner than anyone expects. If gas station owners figure out they make more money from charging than gas, then before you know it, when you pull up next to the pump, it’ll be looking a little different. Especially on the coasts.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    Besides the price point, lack of cold weather range, lack of places to charge and the porky pig weight of this thing I just don’t care for the styling. It looks like they grafted Mustang taillights onto a generic blob of a CUV and added a few flowing side curves in and the Mustang symbol and called it a day. Nothing else here is Mustang at all including the interior that looks like they spent all of a day designing it with zero warmth and little detail other than the proverbial tacked on ipad center stack and tiny tacked on dash. The feature less blob front end puts me to sleep, the lack of visible side door handles gives the exterior an unfinished look and overall the look is very frumpy. I even asked my two Mustang fanatic friends what they thought and both called it the Mustang mistake which is ironic considering both are in their 30’s and the target demographic for this lump!

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