By on January 22, 2021

F-series

The most popular car for 2021 isn’t a car at all, it’s the Ford F-series pickup. Among the top 10 most popular cars, the Silverado and the Tacoma, both trucks, join the F-150.

F-series

In a study of 2.9 million auto insurance applications, where the year, make, and model of the vehicle is disclosed, along with the state in which it’s registered, vehicles with the most drivers in each state were determined to be the most popular car for that state. Models were then ranked by the number of states where the vehicle holds the number one spot. In order, the most popular cars in the U.S. for 2021 are:

  1. Ford F-Series pickup
  2. Honda Accord
  3. Honda Civic
  4. Nissan Altima
  5. Toyota Corolla
  6. Chevrolet Silverado
  7. Chevrolet Malibu
  8. Chevrolet Impala
  9. Toyota Tacoma
  10. Honda CR-V

 

What’s interesting is the Accord, Civic, Altima, Corolla, Malibu, and Impala are sedans or have sedan versions, a style that some automakers have abandoned, most notably Ford, and 2020 was the last year Chevrolet will manufacture the Malibu. Honda’s CR-V is the only crossover or SUV among the top ten, despite manufacturers eschewing wagons in their favor. Honda and Chevrolet tied for the most popular vehicles, each with three models. Regionally, the Honda Civic and Honda Accord are the most popular vehicles in states along the Pacific and Atlantic coasts, while Ford F-Series pickups are dominant throughout middle America, from the north to south.

The ten most popular cars in America are among the most affordable vehicles on the market, with a manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP)  below the national average of $37,851 by an average of $12,600. MSRPs were taken from the manufacturers’ websites for the 2021 starting prices for those models.

In the study conducted by Insurify, driving patterns have leveled out to pre-pandemic rates as of January 2021, while transit use has decreased 54 percent from March 2020, according to Apple Maps Mobility Trends Reports. It comes as no surprise that cars have become a necessity due to the pandemic. The country’s return to normal driving patterns underscores a reluctance among many to use public transit.

[Images: Ford, Insurify, Honda, Toyota]

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51 Comments on “F-Series Most Popular Vehicle in 18 States...”


  • avatar
    Simon

    Poor Minnesota, having the Chevrolet Impala representing them as their most popular car.

  • avatar
    Cicero

    Fun Fact: Half the Accords registered in Nevada are actually owned by people who live in California.

  • avatar
    tonycd

    These numbers are suspect, IMO. The RAV4 outsold the Camry as recently as ’20, and the Camry, Civic and even Corolla outsold the Accord, which was all the way down at #17 per C/D. Accord has had virtually no changes, so this giant leap in sales seems implausible. Ditto for the Ram pickup to plummet from #3 in 2020 all the way out of the top 10.

    Evidently the 18 states covered here are not terribly representative of the nation, so I think the most interesting implications of this data are to explore why. Accords are a tradition in California, and pickups aren’t?

  • avatar
    CaddyDaddy

    In my road travels, it’s true. F-Series disappear at the NE / SD line and Impalas sprout from every corner in MN and E. SD. I do not know anyone in CO that owns an Impala, no one. However, La Sabres and Park Avenues are thick in CO. ….and yes, F-Series is King. I would have fun to see #2 and #3 in the states.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      You kidding? I see tons of Impalas in Colorado – most are the old W-body models, which are old-GM cockroaches. Not many of the last-generation, unfortunately. And that’s a shame, because the last Impala model was a very, very nice car.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Sedans are going to dominate what’s on the road for a long as time. In every state.

    • 0 avatar
      MRF 95 T-Bird

      Agreed. I see plenty of Honda Accord and Civic sedans on the road as well as the Nissan Altima and the Toyota Camry and Corolla.
      Also see a number of Hyundai Elantra’s and Sonatas around. A neighbor of mine just bought a Elantra sedan with the premium package for just under the sticker of $20k. It’s pretty boneheaded not to have at least one or two sedans in any brands lineup.
      The author made an error since the Chevrolet Malibu is sticking around for a few more years while the Impalas swan song was in 2020.

  • avatar
    4onthefloor

    Why is California represented by civics? It’s supposed to be the car capitol of the United States! I guess taxes out there eat up all disposable income, and expensive gas doesn’t help I guess. It’s a great car but for sunny California ? It would be convertible or nothing for me, preferably old and clean.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Interesting writeup Jason, thanks.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    Just a friendly reminder that the FSeries is not a vehicle. The title of the article should be corrected to reflect the facts.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      By that “logic”, the Silverado isn’t a vehicle either.

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        Well, no, once again you’re wrong.

        You can go to a dealer and buy a Silverado. There are vehicles that say Silverado on them. They have parts lists for the Silverado. There is a web page for the Silverado.

        There is none of that for the FSeries. Because there is no such thing as a 2020 FSeries.

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      The F-Series is a bunch of different trucks, all lumped together to increase the ranking in sales numbers. An F-150 and an F-450 are very different, but counted together. That’s like Hyundai calling all their SUVs by the same prefix, then pretending they are all the same basic model.

      • 0 avatar
        bullnuke

        The Silverado is a bunch of different trucks, all lumped together: 1500, 2500, 3500, 4500, 5500, 6500 – all are called Silverado. A Silverado 1500 and a Silverado 6500 are very different, but counted together. That’s like Hyundai calling all their SUVs by the same prefix, then pretending they are all the same basic model.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        Why does this silly argument always pops up?
        All of the pickup truck manufacturers count their trucks the same way. 450/4500 chassis cab trucks and larger don’t count in their totals. Basically any truck with a box excluding compacts.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          “Why does this silly argument always pops up?”

          True, but it’s a silly argument about vehicles on a car site. It’s refreshing to be arguing about vehicles. I’m enjoying the debate.

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        Exactly. You can’t go to a dealer and buy a 2021 FSeries. But you can go to the dealer and buy a 2021 Silverado/Sierra/Ram.

        You’re right that Ford adds the 4 trucks together just to win a fake sales title. Even GM sees the childishness in that and separates light duty Silverados from heavy duty Silverados.

        Ford just likes to manipulate the unwashed masses.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          Silly. As long as the fullsize has a pickup bed, it’s counted in the series, group, line, etc, no matter if it’s Ram, Sierra, whatever.

          All heavy duty cab/chassis’ are not counted in the pickup totals. If no bed, no pickup.

          Get it? The F-450 “pickup” is technically a medium duty, but Ford de-rates for Hot Shots. GM and Ram don’t have an answer for it, but that’s on them. It’s still a pickup that shares the platform with the F-150.

          It’s not exactly Rocket Science.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @EBFlex – Incorrect again.

          If you ask for a Ram truck, they’ll ask you if you want a 1/2 ton, 3/4 ton, or 1 ton. If the Ram dealer sells commercial Ram’s they’ll also ask you if you want a commercial 3500, 4500 or 5500.

          If you go to a Ford dealer and ask for an F Series truck, they will ask you the same questions.

          General motors has 2 truck lines. Sierra and Silverado. They do not count as one because they are different truck divisions.

          When Ford and Mercury were divisions with trucks, they counted separately.

          @DenverMike – Agreed. It ain’t rocket science. It’s simple logic.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          Ram is not a model it is a Brand which lumps 3 different trucks together. Old 1500, New 1500 which are entirely different trucks and 2500 and up which is some of that old 1500 with some pieces to make it look more like the new 1500.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I think EBFlex just likes to be obtrusive for the sake of being obtrusive.

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        Show me a parts list for the 2020 Ford F-Series.

        Show me a list of recalls for the 2020 Ford F-Series.

        Show me a list of TSBs for the 2020 Ford F-Series.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          @ebflex: You’re right. If you check the NHTSA databases including vPIC and the Mitchell Guide, the actual models listed are F-150 and F-Super Duty. They are separate models/vehicles. Looking through the Mitchell guide, I don’t see a lot of common parts. F-150 and F- Superduty are different vehicles. F-Series is like calling the EcoSport, Edge, and Escape CUV-Series. I get what you are saying.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Wrong. It comes down to body cosmetics. The F-150 and F-250+ do share less parts than the Silverado/Sierra 1500 to 2500/3500 classes.

            All Ford classes have interchangeable cabs, doors, interiors, various interior/body/chassis mechanics, most of the wiring and whatnot. Same platform, clearly.

            It gets complicated with Ram since the 1500 and 2500/3500 classes are completely different platforms.

            It’s the Ram Classic that shares the old generation with the current (updated) 2500/3500, if you really want to snivel.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          Show me a parts list for the 2020 Ram series?

          Show me a list of recalls for the 2020 Ram series?

          Show me a list of TSBs for the 2020 Ram series?

          Show me a parts list for the Silverado series?

          Show me a list of recalls for the 2020 Silverado series?

          Show me a list of TSBs for the 2020 Silverado series?

          It all applies equally to every truck brand.

          Ford’s truck brand: F-Series
          Chevrolet truck brand: Silverado
          GMC truck brand: Sierra
          FCA truck brand: Ram

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            So you go around and call the F-150 the Ford F-Series F-150?

            The 250 is the Ford F-Series Super Duty F-250?
            The 350 is the Ford F-Series Super Duty F-350?
            The 450 is the Ford F-Series Super Duty F-450?

            The Silverado is an actual thing. You want a parts list? Ok, which sub model do you have? The Silverado 1500? Silverado 2500?

            Ram is a little more muddy when it was broken off into it’s own brand from Dodge, but the simple logic still applies. You can ask for a parts list or recall list for a 2020 Ram. You will be asked to specify which sub model.

            The F-Series is nowhere listed on Ford’s web site. Its F-150 (or for you the Ford F-Series F-150) and the Super Duty. When you go to the NHTSA recall database, for “2020 Silverado” you get a list of vehicles ranging from the 1500 to 6500. When you type “2020 Ram” you get a list of vehicles. When you type in “2020 F-Series”, you get some Isuzu thing and an ambulance. No F-1510, 250, 350, 450, 550, 650.

            It’s a very simple concept….the F-Series is not a vehicle and therefore cannot be the “best selling” anything.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            It’s the same thing with the BMW “3-series”, “S-series” Mercedes and various others.

            “3-series” sales/stats can be compared directly to “Camry” sales for example.

            There’s not a specific car called the “2020 3-Series”, or “2021 S-Series”, etc, models.

            Obviously it’s an umbrella term used instead of having to saying “The 318, 325, 328, 330 and 331, line of BMW cars are the most…” or similar (waste of time).

            Also sales totals of “series” cars aren’t broken down to specific models.

            Just the same, Camry models (and all other non series line of cars) don’t get specific on model sales stats.

            Meaning “Camry” or “Silverado” are also umbrella terms covering various models (that sometimes aren’t even on the same platform).

            You can’t be this dense. As trolls go, even BAFO showed some intelligence.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            Here are the legal definitions of model, line, series etc:

            https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?SID=e9e04d1dbab6285f7e27151cad41ed25&mc=true&node=pt49.6.565&rgn=div5#se49.6.565_112

          • 0 avatar
            ToolGuy

            “(r) VIN means a series of Arabic numbers and Roman letters that is assigned to a motor vehicle for identification purposes.”

            NOTICE: Check your Vehicle Identification Number! If your VIN contains the letters “W”, “U” or “J” [not Roman letters] your vehicle is not in compliance with current Federal Regulations. Please park your vehicle and do not drive it. (You may report your vehicle manufacturer and yourself to the nearest Federal office.) [If your vehicle is in compliance, please check those of your neighbors.]

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    This is one reason why Tesla put its Cybertruck plant in Austin, TX.

  • avatar
    conundrum

    The most popular vehicles of 2021? Something wrong here. We’re only three weeks into 2021. The F150 has been Canada’s favourite vehicle since Moby Dick was a minnow, about 50 odd years. Canada is pickup country, yee haw, and where the paycheques come from for the editors of TTAC. And where’s the RAM on that list? It outsells Altimas, that’s for certain.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      It’s a reflection of what’s on the road, not the rodeo circuit. Even in Texas, our pickup capital, pesky sedans out number pickups.

      But no doubt Texas loses more pickups to Mexico than any place else.

  • avatar
    nrd515

    It saddens me that Ohio has the Civic.

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    Ugh, Impalas are allegedly the most popular car in my state. That is for shame, bit not surprising. It doesn’t take long for them to become clapped out piles of chevy.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Civics as No 1 in Ohio doesn’t surprise me since Honda has a huge manufacturing presence in Ohio. As for Impalas in Minnesota there are a lot of older Impalas still on the road and not all Impalas are clapped out. Still a lot of older people in many midwestern states that hold on to their old sedans for years and many don’t drive as much as they use to. Still see a fair number of older Lesabres and Impalas where I live driven by seniors but there are also a lot of older Camrys, Corollas, Civics, and Accords.

    • 0 avatar
      mikey

      @Jeff S…Here in Oshawa On. with a city of GM retirees… The full size GM twins rule. Followed by the “W” Impala . On my daily walk I occasionally chat with a retired salary guy.. The dude uses an 06 Impala as his D.D. year round . The Chevy has 200,00 KLMS (124,000 miles).. No rust, original, engine transmission. Such vehicles are quite common amongst the retired crowd.

      I don’t see as many Epsilon Impalas.. I personally drive a Black ,19 ,Premier package just to be a little different from the crowd. Well detailed the Impala draws many compliments.

      Trading my EB Mustang in and buying the heavily discounted Impala was probably the best car deal I ever made.
      The down side to Impalas is the obscene re-sale value…. Me thinks that goes a long ways to explain why so many older Impalas are roaming the local roads. I’m 67 years old and the thoughts of eating that depreciation, does not sit well with me.
      Perhaps I’ll be that old f–T driving around a 12 year old Chevy.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Nissan Altima: what to drive in Alabama. Go figure.

    I would have thought a pickup of some kind would have been the ride of choice in places like Alabama and Mississippi, but if you think about it, the reason why not makes sense. After all, those areas tend to be less affluent, and trucks are comically overpriced.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    We’ll never be rid of common sedans, Altimas, Corollas and what not. Even once you drive the wheels off and walk away, someone else will put them back on. Yikes and they keep making more. Plus Korean sedans.

    At least PT Cruisers will be gone from the face of the earth some day (soon hopefully).

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @mikey–I bought a neighbor’s loaded 45k miles champagne 2012 Buick LaCrosse E-Assist in October 2019. It is showroom new and gets lots of kudos. Still see a number of the full size Impalas and LaCrosses still on the road with many 20 plus year LeSabres in good condition. GM fullsize cars are about the best GM cars ever built. Still see a lot of Crown Victorias and Grand Marquis on the road as well.

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