By on December 29, 2020

Russian SUV

Russian SUV maker UAZ, and Bremach, Inc., an American automotive manufacturer in Southern California, are introducing the Bremach 2022 Taos 4X4 mid-sized SUV. It matters little that you’ve not heard of UAZ or Bremach, they are collaborating to bring the Russian SUV and other vehicles to the U.S.

According to Bremach, their brand has been in Europe and around the world for decades. Founded in Varese, Italy in 1956 by the Brenna brothers, they first produced under license from Aermacchi a three-wheeled motorcycle called the Macchi MB1. The name Bremach was a combination of Brenna and Macchi.

In 1983, Bremach began production of the Brenmach GR, a multi-purpose, all-wheel-drive car. Launching the BRIO 4X2, a 75 horsepower municipal service vehicle in 1993, Bremach later offered the all-wheel-drive Family Extreme.

Since 2006, the company has introduced a new range of cars, the Brick, Extreme, and Job, and in 2008, the T-Rex was their replacement. 2009 saw Bremach and Russia’s UAZ produce the Bremach-UAZ T-Rex, to meet the needs of governmental agencies, road construction crews, and emergency vehicle outfitters, especially in remote areas. Production rights to the T-Rex were sold to Tekne in 2015, as Bremach s.r.l. filed for bankruptcy, and in March of 2018, the bankruptcy was completed.

Russian SUV

Bremach Inc., an American division, survived the bankruptcy and started development of a new SUV 4X4 for the U.S. market with UAZ. This month, Bremach announced the UAZ Patriot 4X4 and pickup would be imported as the Bremach Taos and the Brio in 2021, going on sale as 2022 models. The 2022 Bremach Taos 4×4 SUV at $26,405 MSRP, is said to provide owners with massive value, apparently through offering as standard features a seven-inch touchscreen, in-dash multimedia MP3/USB audio system with 4 speakers and navigation, a rear-view camera, LTE, Wi-Fi, SD, and Bluetooth, heated front and rear leather seats, steering wheel, windshield and side mirrors; and a refrigerated glove box.

Eighteen-inch Sahara alloy wheels, 6-speed automatic transmission, remote ignition, front and rear parking sensors, anti-lock braking systems, electronic brakeforce distribution, driver and passenger airbags, electronic stability program, electronic stability control, computerized technology-improving vehicle stability, LED daytime running lights, front fog lights, cornering brake control (CBC), and a hydraulic brake assist system round out the list of standard features on the Taos.

Russian SUV

Bremach’s Brio 4X4 pickup will also come loaded with advanced features as standard equipment. At $27,882.00 MSRP, the Brio will have the same warranty as the Taos. Like the Taos, the Brio pickup is made possible by working with UAZ and other suppliers. Limited information about the Brio’s content was available at this time, and calls to Bremach were not returned by press time.

Russian SUV

Realizing Bremach isn’t a household name, the company is offering a five-year, 60,000-mile bumper-to-bumper, and a 10-year, 120,000-mile powertrain warranty. Comparing their SUV to the security and utility of a Lexus LX, or the advanced gearing and 4×4 ability of a Land Rover, the company is aiming high for a manufacturer without dealers listed on their website. At present, Bremach is accepting pre-orders, which will be directed to the nearest dealer once they are established. To Bremach, their most important partners are dealers as a conduit to customers, it will be interesting to see if their network materializes.

[Images: Bremach]

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46 Comments on “In the Market for a New Russian SUV? You May Be In Luck...”


  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    Perhaps these will share showroom space with the 6,000 Chinese manufacturers who are entering the market imminently.

    Bring Your Dreams.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      Nope. I will repeat myself but the Sollers company that builds these also builds

      Ford Explorer
      Ford Transit
      Isuzu N-Series
      Mazda 6
      Mazda CX-5
      Mazda CX-9
      Ssangyong Korando
      Ssangyong Rexton
      Toyota Land Cruiser Prado

      May be Mazda can co-host…

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    A Russian and Italian vehicle? What could possibly go wrong…

    What about engine and drive-train specs?

    75 hp isn’t going to cut it in power-mad North America.

    A quick google found this:

    “UAZ Patriot 4×4 Enters U.S. Market As The 2022 Bremach Taos. is powered by a 2.7-liter four-cylinder gasoline engine. It produces 150 HP, driving all four wheels through a six-speed automatic transmission with two-speed transfer case. A manual gearbox will be available as an option. Unlike most high-riders on sale today, this is a body-on-frame SUV, so it should be able to take its occupants off the beaten path without breaking a sweat.”

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Here’s a picture of it.
      zmz.ru/data/content/109/preview.1174585811.jpg

      Pretty basic stuff. Iron block, aluminum head, 16v, timing chain, 150hp/175lb-ft. The manifold being made of actual metal is a nice touch though.

      The Tacoma 2.7L makes 159hp/180lb-ft so this thing isn’t necessarily *hopeless* but I think $28K is too rich when you can get a 4×4 crew cab Taco for $30K and the American-branded stuff for even less.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “Bremach’s Brio 4X4 pickup will also come loaded with advanced features as standard equipment. At $27,882.00 MSRP”

    Where is this being manufactured for nearly $30k?

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Looks like “SeverstalAvto in Ulyanovsk, Russia”

      If things sound too good to be true, that’s because they usually are.

      In the 80’s Lada tried to enter the Canadian market. It didn’t go well. People want cheap and reliable not cheap and unreliable.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I think if they get more realistic with the pricing it could work today. Russian industrial goods are generally not known for poor quality and if anything should be simpler than their Western counterparts.

        • 0 avatar
          RHD

          Here’s “simplicity” for you:

          The 2022 Bremach Taos 4×4 SUV at $26,405 MSRP, is said to provide owners with massive value, apparently through offering as standard features a seven-inch touchscreen, in-dash multimedia MP3/USB audio system with 4 speakers and navigation, a rear-view camera, LTE, Wi-Fi, SD, and Bluetooth, heated front and rear leather seats, steering wheel, windshield and side mirrors; and a refrigerated glove box.Eighteen-inch Sahara alloy wheels, 6-speed automatic transmission, remote ignition, front and rear parking sensors, anti-lock braking systems, electronic brakeforce distribution, driver and passenger airbags, electronic stability program, electronic stability control, computerized technology-improving vehicle stability, LED daytime running lights, front fog lights, cornering brake control (CBC), and a hydraulic brake assist system round out the list of standard features on the Taos.

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      “Taos” is taken.

      They’ll have to go with their second, more fitting choice: “KAOS”.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Just when you thought the Yugo couldn’t be topped as the worst car ever imported…

    The jokes write themselves. These trucks are so bad that even the spyware sends all your info to Antarctica

  • avatar
    lstanley

    The Biro looks like something I always hoped to have one day: a third gen Toyota Kijang pick-up. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyota_Kijang

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      I see a lot of old Montero in that truck

      https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/proxy/QNb5YqmzCwlu5CzApF1Nr_N3SC2IEfHieBJh6hYdiAUCEmuCVqm_R9DnmFKahMkpp52vqyENFtBvfJ8rehcGZxBmPJVVrgOQFIAlOkHKlA

  • avatar
    MKizzy

    With all the tech in vehicles these days, I can almost picture these trucks arriving on our shores pre-hacked by the KGB and ready to collect U.S. Intelligence data on command while their owners run errands.

    • 0 avatar
      Steve Biro

      All that standard tech and an automatic transmission make this vehicle distinctly unattractive to me. What I want in a vehicle like this is cheap, reliable, tough and uncomplicated.

      • 0 avatar
        Luke42

        High tech can be much simpler than The Old Ways, or more complicated.

        It really depends on how the tech is integrated into the design.

        I just added a high tech head-unit with a touchscreen and wireless Android Auto to my GMC Sierra, and it is mostly self-contained. This fancy gee whiz tech gadget actually simplifies what happens under the dashboard to to a surprising degree. You could use the same head unit to add wireless Android Auto to a lawn tractor, if you really wanted to.

        This self-contained head unit obsoletes a whole bunch of complicated electronics were deeply integrated into the truck (OnStar, XM Radio Tuner, a turn signal clicker built into the stereo, etc) — but you just bolt in the head unit and a small interface box which handles all of the vehicle-specific weirdness (RR Maestro), connect the wires, and it’s done.

        You can keep things simple while having high tech, just so long as you keep the interfaces between the different subsystems simple. For a stereo, this means that you get power, antenna, CANBUS, backup camera video signal, and speakers — nothing more, nothing less.

        For mechanical interfaces, you just put it together the way we’ve been making trucks for almost a century now.

        You can easily combine high tech and simple, just so long as you remember to keep it simple.

        If these guys follow the usual Russian approach of “you’d better be as to fix it with a spanner and hammer in rural Siberia” approach, then the interfaces between the subsystems will be simple. If anyone can (and would) combine technology and simplicity, it’s the Russian engineers I’ve met over the years.

        • 0 avatar
          Luke42

          P.S. Some high tech devices are much simpler than the low-tech devices that you replace.

          For instance, if you compare the transaxle in a Prius to a regular automatic transaxle, you’ll find the Prius transaxle is far simpler mechanically.

          The Prius transaxle (the power-split device) is basically a beefy differential with an electric motor-generator on one side, and a gasoline engine (and a motor-generator) set on the other side. The output of the power-split device then connects to a regular differential (so that the car can go around turns).

          This setup is astoundingly simpler than either a manual or an automatic transmission. The complexity of the Prius transaxle is in software, which allows for an astoundingly simple and and long-lived mechanical design.

          Engineering! W00t!

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      “In Russia, America spy on the KGB.
      In America, Russia and the KGB spy on you!”

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      “Forrestal was … fearing Communist expansion in Europe and the Middle East”

      he threw himself out of the window

  • avatar
    Bill Wade

    I had a UAZ 469. While rather rugged, the technology was somewhere between a Model T and a Jeep MB, terrible fit and finish, electrical that would embarrass Lucas while the mechanicals looked like somebody built much of it with a big hammer, grinders and files with an acetylene torch used to bend things to fit.

    Never gave me much trouble but didn’t have enough power to break a crayon driveshaft. Good thing too. I actually felt sorry for any Russian troops that actually had to ride any distance in it.

    I can’t get over the thought they just put cheap plastic on it and are trying to pawn them off to unsuspecting Americans. The Chinese copied the 469. Likely a much better vehicle.

  • avatar
    schmitt trigger

    They should have given it a very distinct Russian model name.
    Like RMBK.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Suddenly Toyota’s decision to axe the Land Cruiser makes a lot more sense.

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    April Fools in December. What a year 2020!

  • avatar
    slavuta

    here is interesting review https://youtu.be/ILv6eMqy2Mk

  • avatar
    myllis

    Patriot is very capable offroad vehicle. It’s also roomy and work quality is same as your US cars. Basic constructions are easy for DIY. UAZ still makes UAZ Hunter which is based UAZ-3151/469 models. But it doesn’t meet any safety standards. Hunter is also available with portal axels. I have once visited in UAZ plant in Uljanovsk. We have factory tour and that time they proudly show new automatic painting line which was just came from Germany. UAZ has also very intresting and large factory museum. Factory trip takes one day and museum trip takes another day. City is also Russian federation founder Vladimir Lenin’s hometown. His parents house is now an museum. Worth to visit.

    Intresting to see how Patriot sales in US, There’s nothing wrong with the car expect ideological prejudice.

  • avatar
    Garrett

    The pickup actually looks interesting.

    Not as much as their T-Rex, which looks to be like a Russian Unimog.

    Given that the Chinese already have a ton of info on me thanks to the hack of the US Government’s OPM, what could the Russians possibly do in terms of monitoring? Figure out how to offer me a discount on my insurance for safe driving?

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    Why a “refrigerated glove box”??? Novichok unstable at room temperature?

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    It’s all fun-n-games until lemon laws.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I doubt these will be a large seller in the US especially with a wide variety of suvs and pickups already available. For the amount of features available the price is not that bad but if I am going to spend close to 30k on a vehicle I would rather spend a little extra for a Toyota or Honda which has known quality and parts and service are more available.

  • avatar
    mcs

    Forget this little gopnitsa toy. If I’m getting a Soviet truck, I want a Kamaz:

    youtube.com/watch?v=xrYRjV1ijvA
    youtube.com/watch?v=MkRI6JgMaMM

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