By on December 9, 2020

2021 Ford F-150 TremorFord has introduced the all-new 2021 F-150 Tremor, the latest addition to its roster of off-road trucks. Tremor’s improved suspension and driveline, increased suspension travel, and approach, breakover and departure angles, are expected to keep Ford in the hunt for off-road buyers.

2021 Ford F-150 Tremor

A new series in the F-150 range, F-150 Tremor is available in three versions, each with an F-150 Raptor-style skid plate, off-road running boards, plus distinctive hood, grille, trim, and technology packages. More off-road capable than the F-150 with the FX4 package, it’s an extension of what Ford started with the Super Duty and Ranger Tremors.

2021 Ford F-150 Tremor

F-150s are built on a high-strength steel frame, with a military-grade, aluminum alloy body. Tremor as a SuperCrew comes with a 5.5-foot box, 3.5-litre EcoBoost V6 engine and 10-speed automatic transmission, plus standard four-wheel drive.

What’s different is the retuned springs for added ground clearance and to keep tires in contact with the terrain. Revised front hub knuckles, upper control arms, Tremor-specific front monotube and rear twin tube shocks lessen vibration at low speeds, with added off-road control.

2021 Ford F-150 Tremor

Eighteen-inch wheels with 33-inch General all-terrain tires provide more ground clearance and a 1-inch wider stance for greater stability, with a bash plate to protect front end components. These modifications result in a 27.6 degree approach, 21.2 degree breakover, and a 24.3 degree departure angle, plus 1.5 inches more travel in the rear and an inch in front.

2021 Ford F-150 Tremor

Running gear includes locking front and rear differentials, with a Torsen limited-slip front as an option. High series Tremor owners get a torque-on-demand transfer case which merges all-wheel-drive and four-wheel-drive capabilities to handle almost any off-road environment.

2021 Ford F-150 Tremor

Every F-150 pickup can tow 10,900 pounds, and has a maximum payload rating of 1,885 pounds. Tremor maintains the work day capabilities that you’d expect. Where it shines is its function as a recreational vehicle, either as a means to get your gear from here to there, or as an off-roader itself. Did Ford say overlanding? Tremor, like other F-150 models equipped with the 3.5-liter EcoBoost V6, offers at extra cost Pro Power Onboard, 2.0 kilowatts of exportable power in the bed for a portable refrigerator/freezer, generator, stove, or heater to extend your adventure travel.

2021 Ford F-150 Tremor

The redesigned hood and front end has a more masculine, aggressive look. A blacked-out Ford oval highlights the grille. Running boards mounted close to the body may limit damage, but aren’t a substitute for sliders. The rear bumper cutout denotes the dual exhaust, flanked by two more recovery hooks. Badging on the fenders, bed sides and tailgate lets neighbors know this isn’t a garden variety F-150.

2021 Ford F-150 Tremor

The interior has special Tremor seat trim with stitching, materials and finishes for the instrument panel, center console and doors, and more orange accents. An auxiliary power switch pack mounted in the overhead console allows the addition of an off-road winch, air compressor, and a glut of lights that aren’t street legal.

2021 Ford F-150 Tremor

If you get deep into trouble, Tremor’s optional 360-degree camera package lets you see what’s happening, and what you’re facing. The front-view camera provides an overlay of the path ahead, and what your wheels will scrape. Three-hundred-sixty-degree and rear views can show any damage that may have incurred.

2021 Ford F-150 Tremor

Ford’s Trail Toolbox contains off-road assist features meant to help those who can’t help themselves. In tight situations, when you’d typically use both throttle and brake to go forward while avoiding damage, Trail One-Pedal Drive combines the two into just the throttle activation. Press to move forward, release to brake, and the truck will apply the brakes as you lift.

2021 Ford F-150 Tremor

Tremor has selectable modes, Normal, Sport, Tow/Haul, Eco, Slippery and Deep Snow/Sand, and Mud/Rut, in case you can’t fathom how to drive in different conditions. In Rock Crawl mode, Tremor engages the rear locking differential, turns off stability and traction control, reduces throttle response, and adjusts shift points. Trail Turn Assist reduces steering radius in tight off-road terrain situations by applying brakes to the inside rear wheel, allowing for tighter turns in low-speed maneuvers, and you guessed it, it’s an option.

2021 Ford F-150 Tremor

In addition to standard Hill Descent Control, Tremor’s optional Trail Control is said to operate like an off-road cruise control. Select a speed, set it and the truck will take care of throttle and braking, so that you may focus on steering. This is not autonomous driving, and will still require that you to watch where you’re going, and not text messaging or checking your email.

2021 Ford F-150 Tremor

The 2021 Ford F-150 Tremor will be available next summer, just in time to hitch your adventure trailer and go. Where that may be is questionable, but at least you’ll know what you’re driving.

2021 Ford F-150 Tremor

[Images: Ford]

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29 Comments on “2021 Ford F-150 Tremor Offers a Whole Lotta Shakin’...”


  • avatar
    EBFlex

    This is pointless. Slapping knobby tires and a Tremor badge on an F-150 is ridiculous when you have the Raptor already. Even more so when you look at the pricing of F150s and the price of a Raptor. Why would anyone buy this imitation off-roader when for a few thousand more you can have the Raptor?

    Ford would have been better served to develop a proper replacement for the F150 Lightning. They already have an off road truck…diversify and give people a proper street truck.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      The Raptor is seriously limited wrt towig and even more so hauling. This, like the Superduty Tremors, retains capacities, while being meaningfully less likely to get stuck in the loose.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        “The Raptor is seriously limited wrt towig and even more so hauling.”

        Exactly, it’s not even what I’d consider a real PU truck. You can play with it like a toy but it is nothing you can put to work.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Well there is always the idea of a price for every purse. So now there is a step below the Raptor in the price rung. There are also people who buy just as much truck as the need.

      I do agree that a new Lighting would be nice, but I also don’t think it will sell as well as this. The earlier Lightings never sold that well and that was back when people bought 2wd trucks.

    • 0 avatar
      SD 328I

      Because most Raptors as configured are at $75,000 (with no discounts). No one buys the mythical $54,000 Raptor, I’ve never seen one at the lot.

      This truck is meant to compete against the Ram Rebel, Silverado Trail Boss and a Tundra TRD Pro. Those trucks have been very successful, this Tremor has similar off-road equipment & actually better electronic off-road aids, also likely same price point.

      Having a more off-road worthy truck that isn’t full bore is a very viable market. Some people just want to hit the local trails instead of running in the Baja, this fit the bill perfectly.

    • 0 avatar
      Oberkanone

      Success is measured by sales.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    Why do they need the Tremor when they’ve the Raptor? Is this Raptor Lite?

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    “Why do they need the Tremor when they’ve the Raptor?”

    That’s a rather simple question to answer..

    The Raptor is as wide as an F350 dually. That severely limits its abilities on tighter trails. The Raptor’s suspension limits payload and towing. That in itself removes it as an option for many people.

    This isn’t a Raptor lite.

    Off-roading is as diverse as the land you drive upon.

  • avatar
    Tele Vision

    You gotta be some-kinda rich to buy a new truck and immediately install tree scrapes and mirror dings. One might see these out on the trails – that they can admittedly handle – at about the same time one sees a Range Rover Autobiography out on them. Selling a pipe dream for profit ain’t new. Is ‘digital mud’ still a Ford option?

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    I suppose I can see this.

    The FX4 never seemed to be there with a Rebel or TrailBoss.

    With that said I really like the Rebel and TrailBoss style but this comes off a bit gaudy.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      How so? It looks like any F-150 with maybe a tire upgrade, until you examine closely.

      When the Raptor first came out, my ’05 F-150 as getting kind of stale and I wanted one bad. They were everywhere in my ‘hood, so I started looking at who was piloting them.

      Every douchey, blowhard and or despised cashed-up business owner, rancher, etc in my area had a Raptor, scrambled to get one. So I had to reexamine myself.

      “Goldilocks” comes to mind.

  • avatar
    Imagefont

    Here’s a little factoid for you. A 4WD pickup with a part time system will spend roughly 500 miles in 4WD vs 2WD over a 200,000 mile life.

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      Source?

      That may be true in the South, but here in the snowbelt it’s more than that every winter.

      • 0 avatar
        Imagefont

        I’m sure icy roads warranty greater use of 4WD, but you’d have to have a very rural route to work if you needed 4WD engaged at all times. AWG vehicle’s with automatic systems are much better on the road. As far as driving down a trail, something this large hardly fits. There’s no such thing as a right turn in a massive pickup. The use case of these vehicles is for the lifestyle you wish you lived, but don’t.

        • 0 avatar
          jack4x

          I live in a lake effect snow belt where multiple inches of snow an hour with high winds is a common occurrence. 4WD on the road is a necessity in those conditions, because plows simply cannot keep up.

          I agree that an auto 4wd setting would be better and I would have ordered it for my truck had it been available. In that case I really would use 4 HI pretty infrequently.

          “The use case of these vehicles is for the lifestyle you wish you lived, but don’t.”

          This is true for a lot more than just pickups. Plus who cares what other people buy?

      • 0 avatar
        Flipper35

        Here in SW WI, I doubt I would put 30 miles per year on in 4WD on the road and I live in a rural area. Our road is the last one plowed, but the road crews do a great job. So, I would use it maybe if it snowed hard and I was at work and wanted to go home. I usually take the vehicle with Blizzaks and don’t worry about 4WD or AWD.

        Off road I have put that may on in a couple weeks when I had a trail truck.

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      I think that 500 is on the high side by a factor of at least 10.

      I put it in 4 HI for tens of feet at a time.

      But I really appreciate it for those 10 feet.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @Imagefont – I can go months without engaging the transfer case but when I do, I actually need it. That 500 mile distance, it isn’t a true indicator of use. I spent a weekend wheeling in my son’s Cherokee. I probably covered less than 50 miles but most of those 50 miles required 4lo. There was another time I was out in the backcountry with my son in my truck. The entire loop was around 140 miles. It took 3 hours to cover the first 60 miles (all in 4×4) and about an hour and twenty for the remaining 80 in 4×2. 4×2 by nature means easy driving so distances can be much greater.

      • 0 avatar
        Flipper35

        Yes, but again yours is atypical use compared to most owners. I used to have a rig for out playing in the trails and made good use of real four wheel drive. The vast majority of buyers think they need AWD if there is snow falling from the sky.

        There are many times people need 4WD, plow truck, farm truck, trail toy and such. All I am saying is that 500 mile is a vast overstatement for the -majority- of people that buy AWD/4WD.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      ‘Here’s a little factoid for you. A 4WD pickup with a part time system will spend roughly 500 miles in 4WD vs 2WD over a 200,000 mile life.”

      I put more than 500 miles on my GMC’s 4WD system in 12 hours pulling an enclosed snowmobile trailer from the Black Hills SD back to MN on some the worst winter roads I’ve driven in my life. That truck had a 180K on it when I sold it after 13 years of ownership, at least 20K of those miles were running in 4WD on winter roads. Probably closer to 25K.

  • avatar
    Dan

    Air dam delete and better tires is a pretty reasonable package.

    Giving it an angry name, seat piping, and a presumable $3000 markup is pretty absurd but it’s also the way to sell tens of thousands of them to compensating suburbanites instead of hundreds of them in the sticks.

  • avatar
    kcflyer

    Keep the tire diameter. Put them on 15inch wheels and add multiple inches of sidewall. Even if it never sees a trail it would be a win in my book. There some nasty curbs in places.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @kcflyer – new trucks have much larger brakes than those of the 90’s on 15 inch wheels. The smallest wheel that will fit on a F150 4×4 is 17 inches. It’s a safe bet that Ram and Chevy are the same. The smallest wheel for a Jeep Wrangler is 17 inches.

  • avatar
    Old_WRX

    Is the top trim of this the Delirium Tremens? (Sorry, couldn’t help it.)

    The name Raptor sounds fine to me, but Tremor reminds me of something like Parkinson’s — which isn’t a pretty association.

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