By on July 2, 2020

You’ve probably never looked at the Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat and thought to yourself, “There’s no way I’m going to buy that thing until the factory makes one with 797 horsepower and a stop speed of 203 mph.”

Those are figures best left to high-end exotics even rich people rarely drive, not the plebeian family sedan. Besides, Dodge has already done so much to make the Charger as menacing as possible, and the Hellcat variant is already the fastest production sedan in existence. There would be nothing to gain by adding another 80 horsepower and 57 lb-ft of torque except continued bragging rights. It’s a preposterous notion. Yet Dodge happens to be a ridiculous company, absolutely loves bragging, and has earned the right to do so.

Our coverage of Dodge’s latest and greatest performance products continues with the all-new Charger SRT Hellcat Redeye.

The ancient Charger and Challenger have continued to be incrementally improved by the manufacturer, arguably becoming the best examples of modern-day muscle (with more flavors than Baskin-Robbins). While Dodge seems incapable of thinking inside the box, it remains keenly aware of what Americans have historically wanted from the automobile: lots of options, room for the whole family, and as much horsepower for as little money as humanly possible.

We cannot yet speak to the price of the new Charger Redeye with any authority, but it has the power angle down pat. By swapping the 2.4-liter supercharger for a 2.7-liter unit and then slapping it back atop the 6.2-liter V8, Dodge has increased the sedan’s maximum output to an impressive 797 hp and 707 lb-ft of torque.

Those enhancements also required bumping up the redline to 6,500 rpm and higher boost pressures, setting off a chain reaction of new parts required for the vehicle to repeatedly defy the laws of physics. Dodge told us engineers had to add a second fuel pump, burlier valvetrain, superior oiling, and upgraded rods and pistons.

It also had to get pretty creative with its cooling solutions — which now include a new hood (with an SRT Power Chiller) and clever ducting from the cold air intake near the front. As you might have expected from a widebody variant, it also happens to have 3.5 inches of added girth to facilitate 20×11-inch wheels that anchor 305/35 Pirelli rubber.

Dodge says the package works out to be only a tenth of a second slower in the quarter mile than the Challenger SRT Super Stock we told you about earlier today. Despite the Charger being intentionally designed to be the more livable of the two, it certainly doesn’t seem to have sacrificed much performance. We guess Dodge’s figures were measured under perfect conditions on a pristine drag strip. The Redeye’s 10.6 seconds at 129 miles per hour seems a little ambitious for the boulevard, especially since it’s running on less-grippy tires than the Super Stock.

The sedan’s higher top speed (203 mph) will obliterate it on a longer stretch of road, however, and 0-60 in the “mid 3s” is more than adequate for the daily commune. Fortunately, you’ll be able to make several attempts to test those metrics. The super-sexy Charger borrows the Demon’s torque converter and launch control system for the hardest and most repeatable launches Dodge could provide.

Production is slated to commence at Brampton Assembly in Ontario this fall, with deliveries assumed to commence in early 2021. Expect it to sticker above the standard SRT Hellcat ($70,000) by at least a few grand.

 

[Images: FCA]

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27 Comments on “Supersonic Sedan: Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Redeye...”


  • avatar
    kkop

    Dear Dodge: Please never stop making these models. Ignore your French/Italian overlords (and euro fanboys bleating about BMW M etc.) and keep making unapologetic full-sized Americam muscle.

    Thank you.

    A former and hopefully future Challenger owner.

    • 0 avatar
      jalop1991

      This.

      However, I have one ask: please supply the owner with a 200bhp key for daily driving.

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        For valet parking*

      • 0 avatar
        CoastieLenn

        @jalop1991- I don’t know much about these HC cars. Why can’t you use the “fast key” daily? Is there a limitation to how long it performs as “the fast key”? Pure ignorance asking this question, I know.

        • 0 avatar
          nrd515

          No, it’s just too tempting for a lot of people.

        • 0 avatar
          turbo_awd

          When I was researching cars, for Hellcat, the owner’s consensus was: everyone who owns one for more than 10-20k miles has had an “oh shit” moment. Now imagine your wife accidentally flooring it on a road with less than perfect traction with 800 hp? Instant spin-out. There’s a video of an SRT/Hellcat spinning out / losing it at HIGHWAY speeds, from hitting the throttle too hard.

  • avatar
    James2

    If you attempt a “stop speed” of 203 mph, will the Earth tear itself apart?

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Worth every penny.

  • avatar
    White Shadow

    All that HP and torque, but still can’t keep up with a Tesla Model S in the quarter mile. At least it’s starting to get close now.

    • 0 avatar
      macmcmacmac

      Begone heathen!

      At least it won’t autopilot itself into killing other drivers.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      It’s like the argument, current minivan HP/performance vs ’60s big block Muscle car. (grand) parents just don’t understand.

      • 0 avatar
        macmcmacmac

        On paper my Pentastar makes 70hp more than my old 5.0LX (R.I.P.). I know which one is/was more fun.

        • 0 avatar
          White Shadow

          Same here. Both my Pentastar and my old 5.0 Foxbody. But despite the fact that it had just 225 HP, it was still faster than my 290 HP Pentastar.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            HP just tells part of the story, especially back then. The Fox 5.0 had 300 lbs ft of torque. Plus it would’ve been much faster but was sandbagged with 3.08 gears in the rear.

            And that’s if you knew to order it with them. Most Fox 5.0s defaulted to 2.73 gears. 3.73s and they were (are) a whole different animal, never mind 4.10s.

    • 0 avatar
      Flipper35

      Maybe not the first run or two, but it can run those numbers all day long and actually make several laps around a track. More consistent build quality to boot.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      And even with as heavy as it is, will likely still be chunking it’s tires less than the Tesla on lap 3 or 4 at the track.

      I know, people only run single drags and hot laps in Tesla’s little world.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        “will likely still be chunking it’s tires less than the Tesla on lap 3 or 4 at the track.”

        That’s the tires, not the car. What would you expect from a tire designed for high efficiency that gets run on a track? Even with my BMWs, I’d have work done by a tuner before putting them on a track. Minimum basic for any car is a second set of wheels with something like Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2s on them. I typically will add coil-overs and a big brake kit which is available for the Model 3 from tuners. In fact, if I end up with a bargain-basement Bolt (in my area, new with the quick charge option is $22,500 out the door) for a daily commuter, there are already third-party tuners with coil-overs and big-brake kits for that car as well (maybe swap in Spark badges to mess with people). Might be fun for autocross.

        As for the Model 3 on the track:

        https://robbreport.com/motors/cars/ev-supercar-this-souped-up-tesla-model-3-is-as-fast-as-a-mclaren-f1-2899312/

        They’ve since changed the rules:

        https://www.thedrive.com/news/24855/tesla-model-3-disqualified-from-tracks-time-attack-for-not-using-approved-fuel

        So, it’ll be interesting to see how this charger does in autocross and time-attack. Although, I think the primary venue for competition for these Dodges will be cars’n coffee.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          Hot laps and short events. Road and track did get a normal track day in aodel 3 with track mode. Of course they needed 2 model 3s. The Tesla’s are great in their envelope (drags and somehot laps). But if your track days have emphasis on the day part of that equation (mine do) you are better off elsewhere unleas maybe your track is colocated with a supercharger.

          And the tires are part of it, but so is the sheer mass of them.

          I’m not even remotely.a Tesla hater and I own an EV. Just seems like the wrong tool for any sort of sustained time at the track.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          And from a pure track perspective I can honestly say I’ve seen more at Barber (3 or 4) than at the local strip (1). Strangely the Tesla lost. It was a test and tune night and they lined up against a trailered to the track built for the strip Vega. But yeah, it would have gapped any of my cars. Certainly impressive on a strip.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            “Just seems like the wrong tool for any sort of sustained time at the track.”

            Maybe you’re right. I’m probably going to wait at least a year for any version of a Tesla anyway. I want the quality issues to shake out a bit and see where the battery tech stands. I’d really like to hold out for lighter battery technology that I think is coming.

            In the meantime, I want a new commuter car and Bolts are going really cheap in my area. The adjustable coilovers seem to be relatively cheap and might improve range when the car is lowered. Plus it would be fun for autocrossing. Low center of gravity lowered further. I’m going to wait for the 21’s to start showing up and see what kind of deal I can cut on a 20.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            I’d like to see that MCS. Haven’t seen one autocross. The range shouldn’t be an issue in that environment and I’m curious how it would do with a good suspension and tires.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            @Art: Here’s a link to the kit:

            https://ev-mods.com/collections/chevy-bolt-suspension/products/chevy-bolt-ev-coilover-kit-bc-racing-q-22-br

            https://ev-mods.com/pages/chevy-bolt

            There are a couple of local EV specialty shops including Electrified Garage that can do the work.

  • avatar
    65corvair

    Dodge should make a sedan that’s just best in class instead of fastest in class.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Why? Plenty of vanilla sedans if that’s what you are after. This is one of the few sedans that distinguishes itself, especially at the RT and SRT price points.

    • 0 avatar
      SSJeep

      No one is buying sedans in quantity anymore. So why change whats already great? I am salivating over the Charger Hellcat Redeye. I dont think there is any way to have more fun with 4 doors. Dodge will sell more sedans by keeping V8 and performance editions on the current well-executed chassis versus doing a total redesign.

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