By on July 23, 2020

2019 Honda Ridgeline EX-L PEI potato field - Image: © Timothy Cain1 out of every 100 pickup truck buyers in the United States chooses the Honda Ridgeline.

That sounds to me like exclusivity. That’s a strong whiff of individuality I sniff. It’s positively road-less-traveled kind of material. And I’m hopelessly drawn toward vehicles that operate way outside the mainstream.

Therefore, in the third model year of the second-generation Ridgeline’s tenure, I swapped our Honda Odyssey for a 2019 Honda Ridgeline to use as the family steed. What else are you going to buy when your vehicular wish list includes exterior and interior cargo space, four driven wheels, reasonable fuel economy, comfortable seating for five, high safety ratings, killer resale value, and a ton of standard equipment?

2019 Honda Ridgeline EX-L rear - Image: © Timothy CainThere’s the rub. As I’ve tried to teach my impressionable, young, Honda-rabid children, the Ridgeline may be viewed by many truck drivers as more of a “truck” than a truck. But for all the Honda’s limitations relative to the competition in its abundantly capable segment, the Ridgeline is the only pickup that qualified for consideration based on our demands.

Unfortunately, pickups are rather pricey, even when they’re moderately sized, V6-engined pickups. In order to roughly match equipment levels with our Odyssey EX, we’d ordinarily need to shell out an extra CAD $2,200 or $5,200, depending on equipment priorities. Instead, we ended up nabbing a low-mileage leftover 2019 demo with near five-digit savings and paired it with Honda Canada’s double-strength pandemic-era loyalty rate reduction.

It’s not the perfect truck. Subjectively, I’d prefer the squared-off front fascia of the first-gen Ridgeline rather than this soft Pilot-aping slope. Second, the 18-inch wheel design on our Ridgeline is my least favorite in the lineup, but they’re likely to shift to winter duty once the original tires wear out and we shift to 19-inch rims for May-October duty. Third, the infotainment unit is antiquated, especially when you consider that we’ve experienced a similar unit in our first Odyssey before upgrading to Honda’s much newer system in our second Odyssey. Fourth, I’d accept an extra inch of overall length and sacrifice one inch of bed length to gain two inches of rear seat legroom. One final niggle: the power windows are slow.

Other than those five complaints, however, it’s all upside. Even the dual-action tailgate that I thought was silly and unnecessary earns praise from the Ridgeline’s primary driver, who uses the tailgate in side-hinged form almost exclusively.

Performance is well beyond adequate in terms of straight-line acceleration and overtaking power. (I’m a fan of the 2019’s six-speed automatic; not yet convinced by the 2020’s nine-speed.) The Ridgeline’s handling (which matters greatly to a pair of enthusiastic drivers who live on a twisty route) shames other pickups, all of which place cornering speeds much much farther down their priority lists. Ride quality is reminiscent of a bygone time in which we wouldn’t tolerate cars that rattled our fillings loose.2019 Honda Ridgeline EX-L white front - Image: © Timothy CainOur rural use over a couple thousand kilometres generally results in 24 mpg driving; 19 when towing an aluminum trailer laden with a pair of ATVs. Rated to tow 5,000 pounds, the Ridgeline certainly isn’t about to ruffle its feathers when hitched to 2,500 pounds. Although outright towing capacity is hardly a priority, our “truck” is frequently tasked with the very kind of truck duties many trucks go a lifetime without completing: towing a couple of times per week, frequently ferrying dirt bikes in the bed, and filling its wheel arches with mud on Sunday afternoon drives.

As for the i-VTM4 all-wheel-drive system and its selectable drive modes, Prince Edward Island’s winter sits off in the distant future as we enjoy 85°F summer days. To be fair, a set of Bridgestone Blizzaks and a front-wheel-drive Odyssey coped admirably with Island winters; the Odyssey’s 4,500-pound heft no doubt providing assistance. But when your driveway drifts in early during each snowstorm, when you live a couple of miles outside the nearest town (of 1,500 souls), when roads often remain snow-covered for days rather than hours, there’s a certain security found in an active torque-vectoring system.

The second-generation Ridgeline’s AWD system differentiates Honda Canada’s offering from the corporate partners south of the border. Here in the north, the 2017-2020 Ridgeline has never even been offered in a front-wheel-drive configuration, nor have Honda Sensing technologies ever been anything other than standard equipment. In fact, the entire Ridgeline lineup differs greatly in terms of content and nomenclature in Canada.

This is a 2019 Honda Ridgeline EX-L, formerly the middle rung in a five-model family that included the LX, Sport, Touring, and Black Edition. (The LX is now dead.) It’s similar to American Honda’s Ridgeline RTL but includes RTL-E features such as front/rear parking sensors, a heated steering wheel, satellite radio, and an auto-dimming rearview mirror, plus heated rear seats that aren’t available on America’s Ridgelines.

Perhaps the extra standard equipment explains the fact that Honda Canada’s Ridgeline performance outshines the 1.1-percent share achieved by the Ridgeline in America’s pickup truck sector.

Here, the Ridgeline earns… okay, well, wait a second. Scratch that theory. The Ridgeline earns just 0.8 percent of pickup sales in a Canadian market in which full-size trucks exert even greater control.

“Clearly, the Ridgeline isn’t going to go down in history as an overwhelming marketplace success,” I wrote when reviewing the Ridgeline for TTAC in 2017. “It simply isn’t what most pickup buyers want. It’s also obvious that the Ridgeline is not supposed to be what most pickup buyers want. The 2017 Honda Ridgeline wasn’t designed to be the ultimate truck. It’s intended to be the ultimate compromise.”

Three and a half years later, I found myself unable to disagree with that conclusion.

[Images: Tim Cain/TTAC]

Timothy Cain is a contributing analyst at The Truth About Cars and Driving.ca and the founder and former editor of GoodCarBadCar.net. Follow on Twitter @timcaincars and Instagram.

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45 Comments on “Joining the 1 Percent: I Bought a Honda Ridgeline...”


  • avatar
    Jerome10

    I think you feel exactly the same as I do with this truck.

    “Subjectively, I’d prefer the squared-off front fascia of the first-gen Ridgeline rather than this soft Pilot-aping slope.” – Exactly. The front end of this truck is way way too soft for a truck.

    ” I’d accept an extra inch of overall length and sacrifice one inch of bed length to gain two inches of rear seat legroom.” – This is probably my biggest beef with the truck. The back seats are a little too cramped and the back cushion is very upright. I wouldn’t want the bed any shorter though.

    Rest is spot on. It’s got a good powertrain (i haven’t driven the 9 speed either). The ride is excellent. It handles well. MPG is solid.

    I think my only other complaint is a lot of the materials in the cabin feel pretty cheap, and there are some panels that are rather badly mismatched. Is it any worse than any other company? Probably not. But it is an interior that looks good but if you look closer it ends up looking cheaper than it should be.

    I’d probably want a truck with a little more offroad capability. But if you’re an on-road truck guy then this I think can make a lot of sense. versus midsize competitors, they all suffer from the same rear seat issue. Full sizers are probably better overall but don’t drive as well and many are hard to fit in garages, parking spaces etc.

    • 0 avatar
      Flipper35

      I just drove a guys 2018 Colorado. Granted it is on the low end but Playskool makes better interiors than that truck had.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        @Flipper35: Ummm…. No. I’m quite happy with the interior of my 2019 Colorado, which is identical to the 2018 I wanted but couldn’t get (150 miles away and the dealerships didn’t want to exchange units to make the sale.) I’ve found Fords and even the Ram to simply feel ‘cluttered’ inside, despite being so much bigger, while I have yet to check out the Ranger or the Gladiator (though the Gladiator’s interior is hardly different from my ’08 Wrangler I drove for 9 years according to photographs.)

        Now, I will accept that you don’t like Chevy or maybe you don’t like mid-sized trucks but trying to denigrate it with such childish statements hurts your argument, not helps it.

    • 0 avatar
      SSJeep

      I agree with your assessment in general. I drove both the old and new Ridgeline. I liked the older, boxier version. The new generation Ridgeline felt cramped and cheap inside. But cheap interiors are par for the course nowadays except in a RAM.

      Other things I didnt like about the new Ridgeline were reduced towing capacity, small fuel tank size (seriously, less than 20 gallons? I HATE stopping for gas), and the fact that it looks exactly like a Pilot from the front angle.

      But it does fit a niche, and people that own them seem to like them. Is it a truck? Maybe. Im not completely sure. Was the El Camino a truck? The Explorer Sport Trac? The Subaru Brat? Hmmmm…

  • avatar
    pprj

    I wish you luck with VCM. It did not work for me.

    • 0 avatar

      As a first time (4 year old) Honda owner (after dozens of other cars and trucks) not too thrilled with potential reliability after talking with more people and hanging out on the forums. VCM issues failed fuel injectors failed fuel pumps failed AC systems, Transmission issues (luckily mostly minor)seem to plague modern ridgleines, pilots and odysseys. Mine just got out of the shop with $1300 bucks in warranty repairs for bucking issues.
      The general consensus among Honda owners seems like that of Volvo owners, sure they make it to high miles but they cost a lot more then a Toyota to get there. Case in point are things like 40k mile transmission services and 15-30k mile differential services.

      • 0 avatar
        Carrera

        Yes, Mopar is right. One thing I did not expect about the 1st generation Ridgeline was the too often maintenance of the AWD system. First VTM ( Honda only) fluid change is at 15,000. That was about $140 at the dealer. Every 30,000 miles thereafter it was needed. Every 50,000 miles I think was the front differential fluid. I used a non Honda synthetic gear fluid for that. Because I’ve always done the maintenance on time, my Ridgeline rewarded me with a pretty much flawless experience. The battery even lasted 8 years.

    • 0 avatar
      Carrera

      My current 2006 Honda Pilot had 226,000 miles. No issues ever with VCM. Just some oil consumption to the rate of 1qt every 8,000 miles since new. Since I’ve started to use high mileage synthetic oil as opposed to just synthetic, consumption dropped slightly.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      PUTC (Pickup Trucks dot Com) rated the Ridgeline’s off-road chops as #2 against the Tacoma (#1), Colorado (#3) and Frontier (#4) the year after this new generation came out. It took #1 in several cases where the others couldn’t even move in default 4×4 configuration on soft soil and completed a hill climb, albeit slowly, that only the Tacoma was able to complete in that other site’s testing. As it was, the Tacoma beat it by a very narrow margin while the Colorado and Frontier took a fairly distant third and fourth.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @Vulpine – my idea of off-roading can’t be done in a Ridgeline. I’ve seen 2 inch leveling kits for them but… um…no. The Colorado ZR2 is what I’m looking at. If not a ZR2, a modified Colorado or Ranger. The other alternative is either a Power Wagon or Tremor but both are very expensive and as wide as a Ridgeline.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          @Lou_BC: Well, I can’t argue about the width of the Ridgeline; that was one of only a few reasons I didn’t buy one myself instead of the Colorado I currently own. Full sized trucks are simply too wide for some of the roads on which I travel and the Ridgeline comes only about 1 or 2 inches shy of full-size width. The mid-sizers trim about another 5 inches off of that. On the other hand, I did like the low and somewhat comfortable ride of the Ridgeline. But I have no need for a full second row, despite the fact that the floor was much flatter… until they changed the second row plinth from essentially steel support bars to a big, flat, plastic something that takes up half the floor, pretty much like any of the others. (Or am I remembering the Tacoma that got that hideous change?) Either way, if I didn’t have the occasional need for the second row (about two times per year) I’d pull that plinth and the seats out of the back of my X-cab Colorado.

          As for the off-roading; I’ve heard multiple complaints about both GM’s and Ford’s traction control making it virtually impossible to move on soft ground… rather than feeding power to spin the wheels in certain conditions (like mud and sand) it will kill almost all power and bind down on the brakes of any single wheel that spun. The Ridgeline doesn’t do that. Now, after the last couple of years they MIGHT have fixed that problem, but combining ESC and traction control makes some levels of off-road driving more of a hassle than fun and if its a farm vehicle, like one owner I know, well, the 2WD (really 1WD) 1990 Ford F-150 single-cab long-bed proved able to cross a field that his newer truck got stuck in… Stuck so bad, in fact, he had to get his tractor to pull it out. In other words, the nannies meant to improve road and highway safety crippled its off-road capability and I don’t know if that’s been fixed even now!

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @vulpine – I can disengage the nannies on my F150 but in 4Hi they kick back in at 35 MPH. In 4Lo they stay disengaged up to 55mph.
            IIRC the ZR2 can shut them off but I’m not familiar enough with that system to give parameters.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @Lou_BC: Yeah… those nanny settings need to be adjustable or configurable for specific conditions because while they may work well on hard pavement they tend to cripple the 4×4 on soft roads. Even 35mph is too slow a setting if your real speed is 5mph or less and you’re trying to power out of a mud hole or the like.

  • avatar
    bkojote

    I had the last-gen Ridgeline (I miss its funky styling) but it’s pretty much tops of the truck world. Aside from the awful infotainment, these are among the best trucks you can buy and leagues better than the awful Ranger or Colorado. I used it from towing to trails (and it’ll go where full-size trucks won’t) and everything about it was phenomenal.

    You’ll also get the people who will insist it’s not a “real truck” and likely drive something like a Chevy Equinox already on its second engine, or a Chevy Silverado that’s already on its second engine, or a Chevy Malibu that’s already on its second engine.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      The only beef I had with the styling of the first gen was the sloped bed rails. It makes it difficult to haul anything that may need to rest against the rail. This isn’t something I’ve done often, but it happens and it seemed like a needless sacrifice if it was for styling only though I was told there were structural reasons. I don’t care for it in the Cyber Truck either for the same reasons.

      • 0 avatar
        Carrera

        I kind of liked that about my first generation Art. Because of those high sides, I could actually pile up more stuff there without the fear of falling out. That gave the truck’s bed a deeper feeling.

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      All this “second engine” talk. How many people replace engines today? I’ve always driven cars further and kept them longer than just about anybody (oldest in fleet is 28 years old) and have never replaced an engine. I don’t know of anybody else who has replaced one either. Transmissions, sure. Engines? Find that hard to believe. Most of those Silverados came with LS engines – you’d be hard pressed to find a more durable line of powerplants.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    I had looked at a first gen Ridgeline as a family vehicle. My then wife actually liked it. it rode nice and was roomy inside. The main thing that killed it for me was the funky slope to the box sides. Any accessories such as boat/cargo racks or canopies that are very cheep for “standard” pickups were outrageously expensive. If it had been this style, a Ridgeline may have ended up in our driveway instead of a minivan.
    I’m sure there will be the typical “this ain’t no truck” comments. The Ridgeline is short in length but is the same width as any full-sized 1/2 ton pickup. Statistically, no one tows more than 5k with a 1/2 ton. Pickups are supposed to be used to carry stuff in the box.
    I’m considering downsizing from my SuperCrew but this isn’t even a consideration since it isn’t much of an off-roader and doesn’t lend itself to modification.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Most of my travel trailers were right at 5k. I towed them all with a half ton. Some could technically be towed by the Ridgeline, but I really don’t like being right up against the max rating. Technically my old Frontier could tow my current rig. I did a couple of times. It was not fun however.

      You are right on with the bed rails though and if you want a truck for typical homeowner stuff but you have to daily drive that truck, The current Ridgeline seems a solid package.

      It does suffer from some of the same issues as the more traditional midsized trucks too…mainly the value proposition during “Truck Month” or “Truck-O-Rama” when the normal fullsized rigs have cash piled on the hood.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @Art Vandelay – one of the reasons I chose a F150 over a small truck was at the time I bought it I was considering buying a camper trailer in that 4-5k range. It made no sense from a safety perspective to put that behind a small truck. My now “ex” was never good with money so me did not get the trailer but my F150 has been the best vehicle I’ve ever owned.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    If I didn’t have a paid for F150 that does all of the truck stuff I need done and is far more capable than I will soon need based on downsizing our travel trailer, I’d have tried to steer my wife to this over the Passport she got. She was less impressed with it than I was though so it would have been a tough sell.

    If your “Truck stuff” doesn’t involve heavy towing it is hard to argue against and the trunk in the bed makes it very nice if you are using it as a daily driver and not just for truck stuff. I like them.

    And this is from a guy that owns and daily drove for several years a crew cab F150 and is still perfectly happy with it. The “Not a truck” is something bantered around more by people attempting to stereotype truck owners than actual people who own trucks.

  • avatar

    How much better is the resale? Just got a used pilot and the prices was honestly similar to other SUV’s of the size with only Toyota seeming to have better resale. While I like the Pilot and man is it every roomy inside, and I think it would translate well into a truck, I think the ridgeline entry price versus what you get makes it bit tough to get into versus a fullsizer.
    Around here it seems you could get a V6 ram crew cab bighorn 4×4 for less then a ridgeline. Fuel economy would be similar as would ride, but you get a 7K tow rating a little more room in the back seat in a slightly harder to park package.
    All that said I still wouldn’t mid a Ridgeline but I really prefer the old ones styling.

    • 0 avatar
      Carrera

      The current Ridgeline price is crazy and the resale price is crazy as well. When I was shopping for my Pilot in 2006 ( bought new) there were plenty of Ridgelines on the lot and the dealers were trying to discount them $3500-4,000 off MSRP. At that time, it was my wife’s turn to get a vehicle and I couldn’t talk her into buying a Ridgeline. In 2009 I started looking for a used Ridgeline for me. After a 3 month search, I found a 2007 base model LX AWD with only 9000 miles sold at CarMax. It popped on my email and I bought it that night right before the store closed. It was a base model but came with non Honda running boards, Honda aluminum ski rack, and a BBak foldable rigid bed cover. The non negotiable price was $21,000. Good luck finding an equivalent to that now for that price and with only 9,000 miles.

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        They don’t lease very well as residuals on a 36/12 lease on Edmund’s has it in the sixty-percentile with the rest of the trucks, small or large. Just that the domestic trucks have more lease incentives and larger cash on the hood making them 70-80% residuals after 3-years.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Many happy miles (km?) to you. A friend at work just got a new one after rescinding his Rivian reservation. It’s a step up from his former 10 Elantra.

  • avatar
    Carrera

    I loved my first generation Ridgeline. I bought it because I was moving with my job to Halifax, Nova Scotia. There was no need for me to own one in Florida but for Halifax it was one of the best snow vehicles. I’ve been on some steep hills, covered with snow and ice, using all weather tires ( not snows but have a snow flake symbol) and the vehicle was unbelievable. I owned it from 9000 miles until 126,000 when I moved back to Florida. I sold it right before the $1,000 timing belt was due. During my 7 year ownership ( five in salty Halifax) I’ve only experienced three issues, not necessarily the trucks fault. The heat shield for the catalytic converter rusted off and started to rattle ($11 OEM replacement) , return line for power steering was leaking and last issue right before I moved back home to Florida was a frozen caliper ( salt induced I am sure). The old model has a bit higher clearance than the new one 8.2 vs 8.0 inches, it seemed to be a bit roomier in the back seat and the rear doors opened wider. I hauled stuff quite a lot with it…as heavy as 1,000lbs all the way from Bangor, Me on a few occasions. The vehicle handled it like a champ. I’ve never towed with it. The gas mileage was abysmal. I never got more than 18-19 mpg hwy. The avearge was 16 mpg.
    I was excited when I heard news of the second generation but when I saw photos I was deeply disapointed. Also, hated the inside once I’ve sat in one.
    If I could find a last year of the first generation with low mileage I would buy another in a heart beat since my commute in Florida is only about 12 miles each way. I just hope the new Hyundai is a better looking pickup truck. I don’t tow, I don’t haul anything but the ocassional mulch and 1-2 bikes. A nice looking unibody pick up is all I need.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Please don’t tell me that Honda still has issues with their heat shields rusting. If you owned a 1980’s era Honda, that was a very common experience.

    • 0 avatar
      Carrera

      Yes Arthur my Ridgeline did have the rusty heat shield issue but in all fairness 5 years in Halifax is pretty tough on any vehicle. They were using salt like it was going out of style. The funny thing is, my 2006 Pilot’s shield went bad too but after 14 years.

    • 0 avatar
      spookiness

      Wow. Had 83 Civic here. Car was amazing and I put on 101k of it’s 205k miles it had at the time it left me, but exhaust systems were not their strong suit. Heat shield got jerry-rigged a couple times and ultimately replaced, and I think I replaced 3 mufflers.

      • 0 avatar
        Carrera

        Starting sometimes in early 90s Honda started to use stainless steel lifetime mufflers. My 1988 Civic’s muffler lasted 7 years.
        I’ve had a 1993 Del Sol for a few years..no issue, 2001 CRV no issue, 2006 Pilot no issue with muffler. Heat shields for catalytic converter? That’s a different story..

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    If there wasn’t an Odyssey in our driveway, I wouldn’t mind a Ridgeline. But I just don’t need all that for the rare times I need a truck bed. If it was more Accord with a bed, then maybe. I don’t need all that extra bulk for what I do, even though I appreciate the Ridgeline for what it is. Plus, I don’t like having two of the same make in the driveway, makes life boring, especially with how similar everything is now.

  • avatar
    3800FAN

    Tim great choice. Did you look at any other pickups? Im looking at the ridgeline but then i see fca selling ram 1500 longhorn v6 crewcabs for 37k after discounts which is the same as the RTL ridgeline. With the rams mpg almost the same as the ridgeline it makes it tempting to go full size even if you dont need one.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      It’s not really the same. The Ridgeline is equal to a fullsize extra cab.

      Except Honda knows fullsize pickups aren’t for everyone, and it’s silly to try to compete. So why not cannibalize their own minivan sales?

      Yeah most of the time I’m not towing heavy or gnarly off road. But it’s just a wildly different experience owning a pickup as common as air-cooled VWs were in the ’70s. I gotta giggle at the availability of new/used/upgrade/aftermarket/flea market parts and accessories.

      I totally understand if you’re the type to keep things stock/original, buys it well equipped in the 1st place, prefers paying someone to maintain/fix, and would rather trade-in when things get boring, stale, and or just looks faded/worn. God loves you.

      My F-150 doesn’t handle like it’s on rails, so yeah I have to slow down to 2X the “curve ahead” suggested speed signs. I can live with that, but I know I don’t have a choppy ride that unibodies are known for.

      For driving across the country, I wouldn’t do it in anything else though.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @DenverMike – where is your evidence showing that the Ridgeline is cannibalizing their own Odyssey sales?

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          It’s common sense. Or just read the article.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Subaru knows it. Even if they don’t come out and say it. Subaru buyers are extremely loyal, and to great extent, Honda buyers too.

            The Subaru BAJA wasn’t conquesting much action and clearly Subaru buyers just had more choices, at the expense of Subaru.

            You can check the charts, Subaru total (unit/volume) sales grew slightly in the BAJA years (’02-’06), but profits dipped slightly in that time frame.

            Other automakers can’t be blind to this, but not every thing is about “profits”. There’s a lot more to it, or would any cars still offer manual transmissions?

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            helgilibrary.com/charts/subaru-corporation-profitability/

            lithialabs.com/_ADP/CustomPage/2012SubaruFortune/images/subaru_sales_chart.jpg

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      I’d be curious to know how our decision-making process would’ve gone if another competitive priced/competitively equipped truck had an in-bed trunk. Tonneau cover wouldn’t really work with our current lifestyle, so that trunk makes a world of difference.

      But there’s more to it than that: other midsize trucks didn’t have sufficient interior space; and full-size trucks with leather, sunroof, adaptive cruise, remote start, proximity access etc. cost a pretty penny. Keep in mind, we grabbed the exact right truck (a deeply discounted demo) at the very right point in time, and we paid way way less than we would’ve just two months prior. Every full-size truck has a lot of redeeming qualities, but there wasn’t really any competition for this truck at this price with current rate incentives.

      • 0 avatar
        Carrera

        Congrats on the aquisition Tim. My criteria when I bought my first generation Ridgeline was, I needed some truck bed, I needed AWD, preferably FWD based, to handle the snow and ice in Halifax. In bed trunk was nice but not a must. At that time, there were really just two vehicles on the market which sort of matched my needs. The Subaru Baja and the Honda Ridgeline. I almost bought a last year of production Baja but the deal fell through because they wouldn’t give me anything for my clean CRV. I am glad it fell through because the Baja’s bed was a joke. Your Ridgeline will handle snow in PEI without the need of any sand in its bed, unlike some of my friend’s Tacoma TRD which always needed 120 lbs of sand bags to keep its rear end on the road.

  • avatar
    Dan

    A crew cab truck with unibody handling and space efficiency is the proverbial brown diesel hatchback that every single dad in suburbia ought to own, but just like that hatchback they don’t and I don’t either.

    And that front end sure doesn’t help.

  • avatar
    thegamper

    Congrats on the new ride. If I had to buy a pickup for less than super heavy towing, hauling…this would be it, simply because it is sort of the “un”pickup truck.

    Kudos to taking the road less traveled.

    STILL, I cant help but think that the sliding door sports car king sort of sold out. Seems like you are trying to find a way to justify buying a truck when you know you probably were better off with the minivan for function….for shame. What with the Odyssey being the greatest thing since sliced bread for the past few years, great for family duty, not sure how a pickup ended up on your driveway unless you too feel that driving a minivan was the automotive equivalent to “mom jeans”. Its going around.

    Kidding aside, great choice.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    Thumbs up on the review. Because obviously the Ridgeline is a better “truck” than a truck.

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    I can’t get past the current corporate face of Honda utility vehicles especially the chrome unibrow and eyeliner, but this type of trucklet would be more than enough for me. Maybe truck up the current Accord’s front fascia somehow and it would look better.

    Then again, if I had my druthers I’d roll something like a Holden Maloo. So car based isn’t necessarily a dirty phrase.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    The important thing is Tim got the right truck for his family’s needs at a good price. Similar to Vulpine I don’t need 4 doors and a rear seat but if I had a children then the Ridgeline would be perfect. I just gave my nephew’s wife my 2008 Isuzu I-370 crew cab 4×4 with 31k miles that I bought new and hardly used. I bought a 2008 regular cab Ford Ranger 2 wheel drive with 101k miles which better meets my truck needs. My wife’s AWD 2013 Honda CRV is our main vehicle. I have sat in the prior generation Ridgeline and was impressed with the comfort and roominess of the cab along with the extra storage under the bed and the tailgate. The Ridgeline is not for me but I fully understand what makes it a perfect truck for others.

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