By on June 30, 2020

Nascar fans. Grindstone Media Group/Shutterstock.com

A while back, I penned a piece describing my mixed feelings about NASCAR running without fans during the pandemic.

Now, a few weeks on, I have a bit more clarity.

I was worried that even with NASCAR’s safety protocols in place, the coronavirus might spread among crew. I was also worried about contact between the safety crews and a driver after a crash that could lead to virus spread (this worry didn’t make the final edit).

Still, I didn’t think it would be as weird to be fan-less than it would be for other sports. NASCAR fan noise is usually drowned out by the roar of the engines, and some tracks draw sparse crowds anyway.

On that count, I was right – the broadcast experience hasn’t been too strange, whether a race is completely sans fans or a small amount of fans are allowed in with social distancing in mind (as has happened once or twice this season).

In fact, I’m enjoying the relative sense of normalcy the racing has brought. Yes, the absence of fans is noticeable, but the cars are just as fast and loud as before, the racing just as compelling. And so far, as far as I know, the safety protocols have helped keep the virus at bay. NASCAR appears to have experienced one COVID case involving a NASCAR employee in March, while a few non-traveling employees of Stewart-Hass tested positive more recently.

Thus far, no one involved in travel to tracks or who has otherwise attended a race in person has tested positive, at least as far as can be ascertained from public reports.

Racing is a unique sport – the drivers are socially distanced while in their cars, and at some tracks, fans will be able to socially distance if they’re allowed in, due to the large size of tracks and the properties they occupy.

You couldn’t pay me to go to a bar right now, but I’d consider paying for IndyCar at Road America, assuming I could stay outdoors and away from strangers. The distance part is possible at RA, but the best viewing spots do get crowded, so I’m on the fence about attending. Still, the fact I’d even consider it speaks to racing’s uniqueness.

On the other hand, I’ve heard reports that the Indy 500 will still have a sizeable crowd, and that concerns me. Hopefully, the organizers can keep people safely apart.

I’m getting ahead of myself a bit, thinking of fans at the races. For now, I’ve been happy to see some sort of live sports back, and NASCAR and other forms of racing might just be safer, in terms of virus spread, than other sports. I thought golf would be, too, but the PGA has suffered a spate of recent positive tests.

I still miss the fans, and I still can’t wait for the day that full crowds can be safely admitted to the grandstands. But whether it’s because I’m desperate for sports, or because NASCAR has been safe (and lucky) so far, or because I’m simply rediscovering the race fan in me, I’m feeling better about racing returning to the track during a pandemic. Better than I feel about other sports.

I also wrote this: “It’s not just about safety. It’s also about optics. Should entertainment businesses, and sports is essentially entertainment, be active when lots of people are dying? Or is it a necessary distraction from the grim news for those of us at home? Testing plays a part, too. Why should a pro-sports league have access to tests when the general public is struggling to get access to testing? That’s not necessarily a NASCAR-specific question, but it applies to all sports.”

I’m still not sure how I feel about sports taking place while the pandemic rages on, especially here in the U.S., where the numbers are still bad. But I’m leaning towards the distraction element as being a good thing. NASCAR being on TV won’t save lives or heal the sick, but it gives a mental health boost to those of us stuck at home, whether we’re home to avoid catching the virus or because we’re fighting a case of it.

If NASCAR garners better-than-usual TV ratings because of it, so be it. It may seem weird for a corporation to take advantage of a pandemic to possibly profit, but it’s doubtful NASCAR brass would prefer it that way. NASCAR simply got lucky that its sport lends itself to social distancing, and therefore it can give us those of us with now nonexistent social lives some semblance of entertainment – and a small reminder of normalcy.

The world is still, metaphorically speaking, on fire. If watching cars go in circles at high speeds for three hours takes our minds off of that, well, that’s probably more of a good thing than bad.

NASCAR, like all sports, is better with fans in attendance. But for now, I’ll take it as is.

As Darrell Waltrip said: “Boogity, boogity, boogity.”

[Image: Grindstone Media Group/Shutterstock]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

51 Comments on “Revisiting No-Fan NASCAR...”


  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    “Should entertainment businesses, and sports is essentially entertainment, be active when lots of people are dying?”

    I think this is overblown. The vast majority of deaths (over 98%) are people with serious underlying medical conditions, people who shouldn’t be in crowds. For just about everyone else, the virus is non-lethal, and treatable.

    The CDC has now reported that the virus is so widespread that eliminating the spread with lockdowns/restrictions is doomed to failure. The spikes in numbers of infections are due to increased testing, and some tests that produce a large number of false positives.

    Of course, nobody wants to contract the virus and go through treatment/quarantine, but so many being tested are symptom-free, or have antibodies indicating past exposure (but are not infectious), that we’re fast approaching herd immunity, if we haven’t reached it already.

    As far as mortality is concerned, over 40% of deaths were in nursing homes. If you’re healthy and have no underlying medical conditions, you’re probably as safe in the stands as you are in a grocery store.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      people always dying.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      Brilliantly stated Lorenzo. Could not agree more.

      Now, prepare for the onslaught from the usual “woke clowns” to demand peer reviewed sources for your information, your own body of research on the topic, and every tweet you’ve ever sent regarding anything.

    • 0 avatar
      Ol Shel

      If the spike in cases is due to increased testing, then what’s causing the increased hospitalizations? Testing also?

      And are states pulling back on reopening because of testing? These a red states, not the kind to fall for a ‘Dem hoax’.

      If we put politics aside, we could all agree that Covid is serious, is far more deadly than flu, can be spread rapidly by young and healthy people, and that the long-term affects of the disease are not yet known.

      • 0 avatar
        Old_WRX

        Actually, it could be the testing causing the hospitalizations. People told that they tested positive are, no doubt, prone to panic. The public has been fed a constant stream of blarney about how this is some sort of bubonic plague on steroids. Panic has put a lot of people in the emergency room. And once they’re there they’ll be tested or diagnosed without being tested — and, voila, another hospitalization for CV.

        Also, stress weakens the immune system. The last thing people should be doing is sitting indoors in front of the modern boobtube equivalent getting all in a panic listening to this [government “expert”] endlessly predicting we’re all gonna die.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          “Panic has put a lot of people in the emergency room.”

          …and the emergency room tells the panicked person to go home if he or she doesn’t have symptoms that justify being in the ER.

          If you are just panicked about having COVID, or have it and you don’t have serious symptoms, the ER doesn’t *want* you in there at all. You’ll get sent home.

    • 0 avatar
      Flipper35

      Considering New Zealand has had zero cases for a while, rolling lockdowns do seem to work.

      You are correct that you are “probably” as safe, but I know a 22 year old kid that would tell you to not take any chances. Well, he would if he were able to. There have been healthy kids as young as 6 that have died from it.

      So far all studies have shown that you only remain immune for months at which point you can become infected again.

      I know in WI there is an increase in the percentage of positive cases per test done so it is more than just more tests out there.

      What I am trying to say is we still need to be cautious. I do have skin in the game here though since my parents and 18 year old daughter would have a slim chance of surviving contracting the virus and for the record, I am a far right conservative (NOT Republican). In most cases we have way too much government and there are only a couple times I have agreed we needed more. Net neutrality and FDA regulation. I think food companies should be required by law to disclose on the package clearly that they use artificial sweeteners for example. I hate having to check all the packages.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Agreed, Flipper, this isn’t about politics – it’s about us keeping ourselves and the people around us as safe as possible.

        And this is coming from a liberal who thinks the virus *has been* overhyped to an extent. But this is what doctors do – when they see you doing something that can threaten your health, they try to scare you out of doing it. Case in point: at the end of 2015, my doctor told me I needed to lose a TON of weight and start taking care of myself, or I’d probably die right around the same time I started collecting Social Security. Now, did the doctor *know* my projected death date with certainty? No. But he succeeded in scaring the living crap out of me, so I did what he told me to do anyway, and dropped 125 pounds. Will I die at age 65 anyway? Who knows? But this I do know: my life is IMMENSELY better because I took his advice. And if I do die at 65, my quality of life until then will be vastly better.

        And if we’d listened to doctors and scientists about this virus, we’d have instituted far wider testing and safety protocols like masks and social distancing far earlier, I think we’d have been far better off today in every way – socially, politically, and economically.

        At some point, you just have to trust these folks – they DO have your best interests at heart, even if they are “overhyping”.

  • avatar
    Old_WRX

    All the in depth analyses I have read about CV testing conclude that the tests that are available have very limited reliability. Really determining whether a person has CV requires more than one test and even then is rather inconclusive. Further at least some of the tests require very careful lab work by highly trained personnel to produce any meaningful results, and are therefore not well suited for rapid testing of large numbers of people.

    Recently a lot more tests have been done. Yielding, no surprise, more positive results. But, there hasn’t been an increase in the percentage of the people tested that show a positive result. In other words: the data does not show a spike.

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      Not sure what planet you are talking about but here on Earth, the number of new cases is only partially explained by the increase in testing. Dr Fauci and other medical *experts* have clearly stated that community spread is expanding, and cannot be explained by just the increase in testing. In NY the virus curves look very much like those in the EU. That’s because a real effort was made to distance and take real precautions…other states that didn’t take the virus seriously have caseloads exploding. The data does show a spike. The cavalier attitude some have for what is a worldwide pandemic is unbelievable. Lorenzo above seems ok with a 40% of deaths in a nursing home. When you get to (not) be with your loved one when they die, let me know and we can compare notes. The lack of compassion displayed by a surprising number of people is appalling. America is being pitied by the world and now we are the banned-from-travel country. Nice work at the top…

      And yes, let sports return when safe. NASCAR, and racing in general, is pretty easy compared to other sports. Wherever we can have normalcy and safety we should do it. I sure miss going out with friends, seeing coworkers, and socializing. But if everyone made a real effort we could have that back sooner. Instead, a simple device like a mask that is proven to be effective, is a political statement. I don’t know about you, but my health means more to me than advertising my political leanings.

      • 0 avatar
        Old_WRX

        “Political leanings”?

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        Fauci has been wrong on just about everything.

        Also, there are reports (which I’m sure the “woke” crowd will quash) that they are reporting the presence of antibodies as a positive test (which is….fraud) and that there are tests that are being sent in, without ever touching a patient, and coming back positive.

        This surge is highly suspect. Riots are now over so we have to get back to the other fake crisis to keep people terrified all the time.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          “This surge is highly suspect.”

          I have extreme doubts that the current increases in Florida and Texas are from a desire to continue a “fake crisis”.

        • 0 avatar
          Old_WRX

          @EBFlex,

          You have to dig around some, but there is info available on the tests for CV. The way they present it in the “news” (CNN, etc.) makes it sound like there is a test they can just give you once and know for sure. That isn’t even close to being true. And, yes, using a positive antibody test as proof positive is fraud.

          Of course some will say this is all “conspiracy theory”. I don’t think the people using that pejorative realize how grossly it diminishes their own credibility.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      We have been told this week that events happening outside are less proned to spread it than indoors. This is what has been used to explain why the spike has not been credited to the protest.

      As such, NASCAR, Baseball and College Football are or can be played outdoors so I se no real reason to not allow fans unless they are being untruthful or spinning this.

      • 0 avatar
        Old_WRX

        Untruthful??? Spinning???? Couldn’t be. And, careful, or you’ll be accused of political leanings:-)

        To be perfectly honest the only political leaning I do these days is to lean as far away from the political circus as I can.

        I gather, though, that republican thoughts strengthen the virus and democratic [sic] thoughts weaken it.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        @Art: “I se no real reason to not allow fans unless they are being untruthful or spinning this.”

        There are issues with some outdoor sports and venues. I don’t know about all venues, but some outdoor venues have large indoor restrooms. Complicating that, in some sports, like football, everyone hits the bathrooms at around the same time and they can be really crowded. You also can’t limit bathroom capacity. There are also issues when large crowds exit some venues at the same time. Everyone is jammed together.

        That being said, I think there are modifications that can be made to fix those issues. It depends on the particular venue and sport.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          I’m not showing up in ANY large crowd until they have a vaccine for this.

          Not worth the risk to myself. More importantly, if if I’m carrying this rotten bug without knowing it, it’s not worth the risk to the people near me.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            I didn’t really like crowds to begin with.
            But, I’ll admit that not being with friends or family members for so long is grinding me down. I don’t think I’ll be able to hold out through November and December.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            I don’t think you need to be completely isolated from friends and family – I think you just need to find different things to do. Being outdoors is a good way to connect with people in an environment that’s a lot less conducive to catching or spreading this virus.

            But bars? No way. Sporting events? Hell no. Restaurants? Maybe, if I can sit outdoors in a distanced setting. As it is, my S.O. and are still having “romantic dinners out” – we get take-out, and we set up a nice little table for two in our bedroom. We can do candlelight/soft music/dancing/etc…just not in someone else’s place.

            It’s all workarounds for now, I suppose.

  • avatar
    JMII

    My tickets for IndyCar opener in St Pete back in March are now for the IndyCar closer in October. I was hopeful things would have improved by then but it doesn’t appear to be the case. Maybe I should have taken the refund when they offered it. Instead I’ve got a bad feeling I’ll eating the cost of these tickets. I’m most definitely in the high risk category (type 1 diabetic) and FL is setting new records every day. But don’t worry I have it on good authority that this is under control. UV light and heat kill the virus… no?

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “UV light and heat kill the virus… no?”

      I believe that is still accurate information as I haven’t seen any data to the contrary. Unfortunately in practice that doesn’t help much because people tend to spend a lot of time indoors when it is nearly 100 degrees.

    • 0 avatar
      Old_WRX

      Didn’t our illustrious president say something about bleach killing it? Or was that someone else? I guess bleach would kill the virus, but it would have a nasty tendency to kill the patient, too.

    • 0 avatar
      Matt Foley

      Having Type 1 diabetes does NOT make you more susceptible to contracting COVID-19.
      Source: Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation
      https://www.jdrf.org/coronavirus/

      I’m a T1D too. Took a week’s vacation to the OBX three weeks ago, where hardly anyone was wearing masks. Had a great time. When I got back, I went to a bar with an old buddy. Had a couple of cold draft beers and a Cuban sandwich.

      Go to the race, JMII. Enjoy life and don’t believe the fearmongering. And don’t forget to root for Charlie Kimball. He’s a member of our T1D club, too.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Having diabetes doesn’t make you more susceptible to contracting COVID – it makes you more susceptible to getting seriously ill from it. Same for many other chronic illnesses.

        Makes an excellent case for doing simple, easy stuff like wearing masks and keeping your distance from other people, if you ask me – you may have this rotten bug and not know it, so even if you don’t have health issues that would make you more susceptible to getting seriously ill, you might put someone at risk who is.

        Put differently: maybe you and your buddy who you went out for dinner and beers with don’t have risk factors, but what about the folks at the table next to you, or the lady in the grocery store, etc?

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    I’ve decided that the best person to protect me is ME. Until such time that I receive conclusive evidence to the contrary I will wear a mask, practice social distancing, stay away from crowds indoor or out, stay clear of planes, trains and buses, wash my hands and try to stay healthy

    You all can do what you want, best of luck to you

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      If everybody did what you are doing, we could crush this…I do exactly the same. Our leaders should take charge and set an example. Compare Cuomo’s response and results to the NY disaster with the Federal response. Night and Day.

      • 0 avatar
        285exp

        If only the rest of the states had been as effective as New York at minimizing Covid infection and death, things would be a lot different.

        Congrats Gov Cuomo.

    • 0 avatar
      Old_WRX

      @Lie2me,

      I’m careful, too. Properly fitted N95 mask, hand sanitizer, don’t go out often at all, etc, I’m not worried about it for myself, but my better half is immune compromised and I don’t want to bring her home anything nasty.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Wow, some common sense. Maybe if we saw more of that, we wouldn’t be talking about “spikes.”

      The thing that really kills me (har har) about this whole pandemic is that it’s become a political litmus test – the folks who are talking like Lie2Me are usually on “the left,” and the “damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead” folks tend to be on the “right.” And the latter group seems to be about 99.9% all-in for Trump. Ironically, though, the “freedom, whiskey and Trump” crowd doesn’t seem to get that if everyone just did the simple, cheap, easy stuff that Lie2Me is talking about, and if we’d invested in far wider testing, all the “lockdown” stuff that has them so exercised could have been far more targeted, and the economic impact could have been mitigated.

      Instead, Trump and many of his supporters seem bent on this whole “lockdowns are tyranny, testing is a Democrat plot and masks are for leftist pansies” claptrap…ignoring that if we’d done all of that aggressively up front, the economy – Trump’s big selling point – would be in far better shape. Heck, he could have even run as the “guy who beat COVID.” Net result? Trump would have been re-elected in a landslide. Instead, he’s in a real race against Biden, who ain’t much of a candidate, to put it lightly.

      I don’t get it.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        I know of several younger people that would be politically “left” that post on social media about the importance of social distancing and dutifully wear a mask to the grocery store but then spend all weekend at house parties, at bars, or with their friends.

        Then I know of several older people that would be politically “right” that complain about any COVID prevention measures but then spend way more time at home than the people in my first paragraph.

        YMMV but I’d be interested to know if people’s actual actions show much correlation to their stated politics.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Goes to show that irresponsibility is neither “left” nor “right.”

          But I do think there is a definite political division at work here. I post on another more political board, and an article about how a city in Missouri is now mandating masks was a perfect example of this – the “masks are fascism” crowd was 100% conservative Republicans.

          I get why they’re exercised about social distancing – they’re concerned about the economy. They’re not wrong for being concerned – this has been a disaster. I’ve been impacted, and that impact may get more severe as time goes on.

          But what I don’t think the “freedom ‘n whiskey ‘n Trump” guys get is that more a pro-active approach to this virus would have probably been far less damaging to the economy in the first place. And that would have put their preferred presidential candidate in a far better position come November.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    It was very unique to drive past IMS today (there’s one Indycar and two Nascar races this weekend) and see almost no activity. They have tarps with advertising on a lot of stands that will show up well on tv.

  • avatar

    CDC has to learn from protest organizers how they do it. Some how they manage to violate all COVID-19 restrictions without causing any harm.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      Judging by my friends’ Facebook live streams of the protests in my town, the protestors do the following:
      1) Wear masks
      2) Stay outdoors
      3) Maintain 6′ distance

      It’s not rocket science, but only community-minded people will put forth the effort.

      Fortunately, most of the people who want to protest police violence *are* community-minded.

      Wanting to keep your friends and neighbors from being choked to death by the police over a twenty dollar bill, and wanting to keep your neighbors from getting COVID-19, are both real-life pro-life positions — even if the term “pro-life” means something very different in American political discourse.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        These were the protests in the town close to me. I’m seeing a lot of #2 but not a ton of (proper worn) #1 and almost no #3.

        tinyurl.com/ycvjhzal
        tinyurl.com/y952wwpn
        tinyurl.com/y8ubkw2p

        Maybe things were different in you area.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Yeah from what I saw here, masks and social distancing weren’t a thing. Then again, masks and social distancing aren’t really a thing among those not protesting either.

        Either way, where can I get my Braves opening day tickets? They play outside and there was yet another story this evening saying how outdoor stuff is mostly safe. Strange since they were threatening to shut down churches doing outdoor services at one point.

        • 0 avatar
          Daniel J

          @Art,

          I have no idea what you are talking about here. I live in the same city as you do. The two major protests we had here, the 10’s of videos I saw of the protests from the 1st and the 3rd had many protesters not wearing masks at all or wearing them underneath their chin. Many were shoulder to shoulder chanting and yelling.

          I don’t know about ADHP, but it has been reported in multiple states that their health departments have been instructed NOT to ask if the individuals were test positive were at a protest. I don’t know if that is the case here.

          It’s also just as easy to explain the increases accross the country to Memorial day, as the holiday coincided in days with many of the protests.

          Its also quite plausible that as the south heats up, many people are going inside.

          Its also overly broad and disingenuous to state that “masks and social distancing aren’t really a thing among those not protesting either”. From the videos I saw most of those at the protests were lesss than 25. When I go out and about, many of those not wearing masks are younger people. Many are older people. From my own “anecdotal” experience, those not wearing a mask fall across all demographics and age groups.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            What difference does it make what others are or aren’t doing? Anyone not using any of the prescribed protection deserve exactly what they get

            No one who’s died on a respirator uttered these finale words, “But the protesters…”

          • 0 avatar
            Luke42

            @Lie2me,

            “What difference does it make what others are or aren’t doing?”

            When it comes to masks and COVID-19, what other people doing has everything to do with everything.

            The mask does not protect you, it protects everyone FROM you. Asymptomatic people can spread the virus, so the people spreading the virus don’t necessarily know they’re sick. In order for the mask to prevent the spread of the virus, everyone else has to wear them — and you are everyone else to somebody.

            There is a lot about COVID-19 which conflicts the “rugged individualist” theory of the world. The problem and the mitigation both require a community mindset to understand and implement. It is what it is. Such is life.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Luke, forcing people to act responsibly seems to be a problem, for some reason for the most part we obey traffic laws to protect ourselves and others, but when it comes to masks and social distancing it’s suddenly an infringement on “our rights”. Well, just like driving defensively I will do what is necessary to defend myself even if others choose not to

          • 0 avatar
            Luke42

            @Lie2me:

            “Luke, forcing people to act responsibly seems to be a problem, for some reason for the most part we obey traffic laws to protect ourselves and others, but when it comes to masks and social distancing it’s suddenly an infringement on “our rights”.”

            The people who are complaining about “no mask no service” don’t seem to have a problem with “no shirt, no shoes, no service.”

            The obvious conclusion is that the real issue is the phenomenon which Silicon Valley condescendingly refers to as “change anger”.

            “Well, just like driving defensively I will do what is necessary to defend myself even if others choose not to”

            I’m stuck living COVID-world regardless of how I, or anyone else, feels about it, so I might as well make the best of it. Defensive driving is as good of a way to describe how I do this as anything else!

  • avatar
    jkross22

    “I’ve heard reports that the Indy 500 will still have a sizeable crowd”

    I’ve never attended a NASCAR event, but my guess is that the average fan isn’t the model of good health and is likely to have health issues like obesity.

    If unhealthy, obese NASCAR fans attend, what are the odds they also don’t wear masks and get real close to one another?

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Good thing the Indy 500 isn’t a NASCAR event then.

      The NASCAR race at Indy is happening this Sunday and there will be no fans in attendance.

      I’ve also attended several NASCAR events in my life and the crowd’s propensity for being overweight or desire to “get real close to each other” (whatever that means) isn’t any worse than the crowds of other spectator sports within the same region.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      “I’ve never attended…but that won’t stop me from rendering my opinion, which is already invalid because I don’t even know what race I am talking about’

      the internet in 2020!

      • 0 avatar
        jkross22

        Art and ajla, you’re right. I should not have said anything here. Better to say nothing and let people wonder if you have no idea what you’re talking about.

        I know it’s the internet and apologies are verboten, but my bad.

  • avatar

    From my observations on TV news they stand close to each other, shout loudly without wearing masks, run from or toward the police, deface everything on their path like Taliban, throw stones and Molotov cocktails, loot stores and so on. Behave as if they just came from stone age.

  • avatar
    hondaaustin

    I just wish I could walk across the street to IMS this weekend for an awesome line-up of racing… but unfortunately, no fans this weekend…maybe someone will let me in. (Yes, I live across the street from the speedway.)

  • avatar
    Old_WRX

    Has anyone actually heard where they came up with 6 feet as the safe distance? I’ve seen two studies of how far contagion can travel. Several years ago I saw a study done on how far contagion can travel from a sneeze or cough (?); the conclusion of that study was: 30 feet. A study I saw more recently concluded 23 to 27 feet. I have yet to see or hear any objective info suggesting that 6 feet of physical distance is….

    • 0 avatar
      carlisimo

      It’s based on how far droplets above some size (5 or 20 µm to 100 µm) travel before landing when someone breathes or talks normally. The 6 ft figure has been used for years, usually in the context of the flu.

      Coughs and sneezes do send them out something like 30 ft – if you’re going out with symptoms like that, heavens help everybody else. Shouting and and singing are a little worse than 6 ft; I remember reading that after a choir superspreader event.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • la834: > “the Bronco II’s main competition coming from General Motors via the S-10 Blazer and S-15 Jimmy....
  • ect: I acquired an ’87 Jeep Cherokee as a company car. It was head and shoulders above the Bronco II.
  • bd2: Kia could have done better if they had more inventory of models like the Telluride (which was vastly outsold by...
  • ect: Ditto, Tim. Reality is that, as I joke with my friends, it’s hard to tell what’s a weekday and...
  • Jeff S: Ok I meant timing chain but either is bad. I believe the design was to save space under the hood. I love the...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber