By on June 22, 2020

2020 Chevrolet Silverado front quarter

Once upon a time, crew cab pickups were for logging crews in the Pacific Northwest, not families. That’s obviously changed. Whereas the typical pickup configuration was a regular cab, long-bed setup (efficient!), times change, and with it the take rates of various truck configurations.

In the eventful 2020 model year, it seems the buying public has never had less use for once-common body styles. It’s four doors, or get lost.

According to data posted by JATO Dynamics, the 2020 model year — thus far —  has seen the take rate of regular and extended cab trucks sink to new lows. In the U.S., crew cab pickups made up 83.1 percent of 2020MY pickups sold through May of this year. That’s up from 77.8 percent for the 2019 model year, and a significant jump from the 69 percent seen back in the hazy, long-forgotten year of 2016.

In Canada, a full 88.9 percent of 2020 pickup rolling stock has been crew cab in nature, once again showing that, despite their tireless environmental smugness, Canadians like their trucks a lot. Last year’s take was just 80.5 percent, and 2016 shows crew cabs eating up 79 percent of the market. A big gain for 2020, clearly.

Regular cabs, which barely make up more than a drop in the overall glass, have been relegated almost entirely to fleets, with few rugged individualists chalking up some sales in the retail market. You’re most likely to see a white, regular cab F-150 XL bearing the logo of some sort of landscaping company on its doors.

Full disclosure: I dig the vehicle seen above.

For the current model year, regular cab pickups made up only 3 percent of the U.S. mix, down from 6.6 percent in 2016. Extended cabs account for 14 percent of sales in the U.S., down from 18.7 percent in 2019 and 24.4 percent in 2016.

In Canada, extended cabs make up 9.6 percent of the market, meaning that true two-door, backseat-lacking models account for just 1.5 percent of all pickup sales. That’s half that of the United States.

While it’s true that production timing and model changes can account for some of 2020’s decline in sales of unconventional truck bodystyles (General Motors saved its new-generation regular cabs until last, with the Chevrolet Silverado HD regular cab only going on sale last month; Nissan ditched unpopular configurations for 2020, including the Titan and Titan HD regular cab), the public’s growing preference for crew cabs is clear.

2019 Ford Ranger profile

[Images: Chris Tonn/TTAC, General Motors]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

90 Comments on “Foursome: America Shuns Non-Crew Cabs Like Never Before...”


  • avatar
    JMII

    More proof that most pickups are used as every day vehicles and not for hauling duty. These things are loaded to the gills so the stripper single cab is clearly not what people want. Neither do the OEM chasing profits as the 4 door has a larger sticker price. However its not just trucks – sales of two door vehicles have dropped off a cliff.

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      It’s actually more proof that even fleets and people who work out of their truck every day see the advantage in carrying 4 workers in a single truck instead of two, having lockable storage without compromising bed space, etc all for a small cost in dollars and overall length.

      • 0 avatar
        Drew8MR

        Not compromising bed space? What? You lose over half your box in a 4 door. And 2 guys to a truck is about optimal for my business. If the job needs 4 guys, you’ll need more than one vehicle anyway,you can’t carry 4 guy’s worth of tools in a 4 foot bed and you’d need to unload everything if you needed to go get gas or whatever. I do agree for a lot of trades a van makes more sense because you’d be an idiot to consider something behind automobile glass “lockable storage”. My newest truck is a Mitsu cab over though.

        • 0 avatar
          jack4x

          I own a crew cab 8 foot bed truck.

          Just because homeowners buy 5 foot beds doesn’t mean they are the only option.

          • 0 avatar
            Lorenzo

            JMII was just pointing out the larger number of buyers are those homeowners using them as everyday vehicles. They’re not making full size, RWD, V8 family sedans with huge trunks anymore, and the crew cab is the closest replacement.

          • 0 avatar
            HotPotato

            Hope you never need to, uh, park it.

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            @Hot Potato,

            You’re not going to believe this, but I park it every time I take it somewhere.

            Does it take 3 point turns to get into some spots? Yes.

            Do I sometimes choose to park farther away from the store to make things easier on myself and others? Also yes.

            But it’s also why I have no patience for the whiners here who complain that trucks and SUVs have become too large to park. Because if I can do it in a CCLB, anyone with a few brain cells can do it with a smaller vehicle.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @jack4x: While I do agree with some of what you say, the problem with that crew-cab-ultra-long-bed truck is that it is simply too big for most painted in parking spots… especially those in high-density shopping areas like malls and movie theaters (not to mention parking garages, etc.) The length alone pretty much guarantees taking up two spaces, nose to tail, but the width, too, can be amazingly tight, where the body fully fills the painted lines, leaving no room to open your doors during a holiday shopping season, if at no other time. Yes, it CAN be done but not only is it an annoyance to you but also an annoyance to the drivers of vehicles to either side. And intentionally taking up FOUR parking spaces, as some have done, engenders more than just annoyance but total outrage, to where some of those $$$holes end up getting their vehicles either towed or blocked in such a way that they can’t even access their vehicle or move it out until they get let out or go through some veritable contortions to access their vehicle. (You tube has numerous examples of how people handle multi-space parking problems.)

            As such, I agree that parking farther out is a benefit to both you and them but when it gets to the point that you’re walking a quarter-mile or more from the very outskirts of the parking lot… well, a lot of those drivers don’t want THAT level of inconvenience, no matter how much they may need the exercise.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @Drew8MR – vans are great for plumbers, electricians etc. since they are covered and can be set up to carry a lot of “little” items. Pickups are superior when carrying bulky cargo, dirty or malodorous cargo. I has a Safari van for 2 years instead of a pickup. It always smelled like the last load. Fine if I had been carrying lumber but was sh!tty if I took a big load of garbage to the dump or had a dirt bike strapped down with a few jerry cans of gas.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Just because pickup owners aren’t hauling max payload 24x7x365 doesn’t mean they aren’t used for hauling. You know, every trip in my ST isn’t like doing a ride along with Ken Block nor are all my jaunts in the Challenger me doing my best John Force impersonation. Sometimes you just go somewhere in your vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      Imagefont

      My next door neighbor has a crew cab F150 King Ranch 2WD 3.5EB with a draw bar always in the hitch even though he has never towed anything. He uses it to commute 1 mile to work. It has a bed cover to keep it clean. The biggest payload he has ever pulled is his wife and his dog.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        My next door neighbor has a Charger SRT. It has never seen a race track and it spends its days and 4 seats shuttling him to work getting worse MPG than my truck on the odd day I drive it to work.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @Imagefont – 2 neighbours had Jeep Unlimited Wranglers. Never saw them dirty and they never went off road with them. Buy what ever makes you happy.
        The same comments come up about pickups every time.

    • 0 avatar
      thegamper

      Every truck post seems to include a debate about how people use trucks. This article, among other things, goes quite a ways to prove that trucks are primarily commuter vehicles as we all know that a minivan is more useful than a shortbed. Despite this, there is the chorus who touts their frequent use of their truck’s capabilities, performing tasks that couldn’t possibly be performed by lesser vehicles. Maybe that’s true, but maybe truck lovers and truck detractors can just come to an unspoken agreement.

      It’s sort of like the Emperor’s New Clothes. It’s ridiculous to sidestep it, to plug your ears and cover your eyes so that the truth doesn’t somehow exist. Everyone who drives (truck owners included) sees a thousand pickups, each lugging one solitary little guy to work, knows full well that the emperor is naked, and that trucks are commuters just like the econoboxes they tower over. Why can’t we just agree that people like their underworked and oversized commuter boxes that will never see a day of work, or leave pavement. Yeah owning one silly in many respects, yes it’s probably overcompensation for many, yes it’s wasteful, yes it’s annoying to everyone else on the road….but… MURICA.

      With this simple understanding, Truck lovers everywhere can move on and powerstroke it all night long to their sweet ride. The anti-truck crowd can move on with the meaningless victory that they are right and rest easy in the knowledge that nobody who drives a truck cares nor wants to hear our opinion. If we could just each acknowledge these undeniable truths we can finally live in peace.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        “…we all know that a minivan is more useful than a shortbed…”

        For lots of things. But not for picking up skidsteers at the local rental place. Nor for towing the boat to the lake come weekend.

        Even the marketing of pickups, now largely focuses on their prowess at towing, not in-bed hauling. The bed serve mostly to cover up the length of frame required to give the truck a wheelbase sufficient to tow 5 tons.

        • 0 avatar
          redapple

          Gamper is correct

          “Work Sampling” 101 will reveal PIG UPs are being used to haul a load ~~ 3% of the time in my area.

          They handle like crap. ride crap. Massive pig never fits square in a parking lot. Wife and kids need a ladder to get in. (and wifey puts up with this???) 15 MPG

          I dont get it.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            You probably don’t “get” sports cars either. They spend around 0.003% of their miles chewing up tires at the track.

            Your head would explode if you knew semi trucks drive around empty, unloaded, deadheading around 40% of their miles..

            If your wife is that tiny, she also needs a ladder getting up in a Tahoe and such. Never mind trying to park a Tahoe and can she see over the steering wheel??

            Clearly what you give up is better than what you lose. 15 MPG isn’t terrible, especially if it’s not your primary commuter.

            Pickup aren’t meant to handle like they’re on rails (try a Jeep Wrangler), but you’d be surprised how well they ride. What you don’t get is a choppy ride that’s guaranteed in smaller vehicles. And try 30 PSI in the tires.

            Plus there’s nothing better on a long ride. It’s also a problem (for you and your side) that most everything else sucks, screams of corporate greed, and or a poor value compared to pickups (especially mid-trim, before rebates and whatnot), even if your needs don’t include (occasional) 4 wheel traction, camping, sports/community/church flea market events, home ownership/chores, towing/payload, etc, etc.

            Unless something drastically changes, new hot trend or something, expect much greater uptake of pickups, especially midsize.

          • 0 avatar
            JMII

            Spot on. My observations indicate most trucks are just commuter vehicles. Why? I can’t figure that out… other then like SUVs and 4WD vehicles the masses have fallen for the marketing that you need these things to survive in suburban life. The guys I know love their trucks claiming they need the space. In the past they would drive a full size car but apparently those aren’t cool anymore so the answer is a lifted truck now.

            I am a truck owner myself (mid-size V8 Dakota Quad Cab) but only use it tow on the weekends. It’s boring to drive and gets terrible mileage. Even with a mid-size parking can be challenging. I would not want to be stuck driving it daily however I did that for awhile when I could only afford 2 vehicles. Once the truck was paid off I bought a sports car for daily driving. Way more fun and still gets better mileage.

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            @JMII,

            The error is assuming that everyone shares the enthusiast mindset that what makes a vehicle fun to drive is handling prowess and acceleration.

            I don’t drive either of them daily, but my truck would be a better daily driver than my sports car, despite being “less fun”. The seat is more comfortable, the range is better, the mileage is the same, the higher ride height is enjoyable, the suspension is more forgiving, etc. There’s plenty of people who find trucks fun to drive. I’m one of them.

            And yes, a sedan is probably “objectively” better than either. But just last week we got to read an article about how even the Toyota Avalon was being sportified. No one seems to value ride comfort, it’s all handling now. If you want something that approximates the old school, long wheelbase, comfy, BOF ride quality, you need a truck. You say full size sedans aren’t cool anymore, I say they don’t exist anymore.

          • 0 avatar
            pveezy

            When is the last time you drove a truck? At work I daily drive either a 2013 F-150 or a 2015 Ram 1500 and they both ride nicer than my Camry. Especially the Ram with its coil springs. They obviously don’t handle as well but they don’t handle bad either. The Ram with Michelin Defenders drives similar to a large SUV. None of the bounce that you expect from 90s trucks. I can see why so many families buy them.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “My observations indicate most trucks are just commuter vehicles.”

            Seriously?

            My brother DOES use his truck as a commuter vehicle. How else does he get to logging camps, road and bridge construction sites or multi-million dollar projects he has to oversee?
            Everyone I know that works in the forestry industry uses their pickups as commuter vehicles.
            What a silly argument.

            There isn’t anything out there as versatile as a pickup for me. I drive one vehicle that has to cover as many as my needs as possible.

      • 0 avatar
        HotPotato

        In the name of the Ford, and the Chevy, and the Ram and Also-Rans, Amen.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @JMII – Statistically at least 1/2 are still used for work. Crewcab trucks are more versatile. Seatbelt and child “booster seat” laws mean that if you have a family you have to buy a crewcab. I don’t see many pickups with a 5.5ft short box but I do see more of them in places like Vancouver. Regular cab trucks are the domain of fleets and old guys or young single guys. A friend of mine has a “fleet” regular cab truck because the company won’t give him anything else. My brother works for the same company and only drives company crewcab trucks. He’s got the “pay grade” to get basically anything he wants. I see a lot of loggers heading out into the bush in crewcab trucks and are the only occupant. The truck sees work duty and then gets used to drive the family around.

  • avatar
    Pig_Iron

    I despise these sedans masquerading as trucks, but I am a fossil. Regular cabs seat too many as it is. I barely tolerate extended cabs. Where’s my stick?Where’s my step side? Where’s my torquey non-turbo motor. You don’t want my money – fine. I’ll buy used.

    • 0 avatar
      Drew8MR

      Yeah, no one has ever been in either of my backseats, and I rarely (like maybe 1% of miles driven rarely) have a passenger.

    • 0 avatar
      statikboy

      The problem with that attitude (and I know because I share it regarding cars – Where’s my stick? Where’s my sightlines? Where’s my lightweight tossability? Where’s my road feel?) is that the used market is made up largely of the market of the last 5 to 10 years and most of the qualities we cherish have already been gone for the last 10 years.

      • 0 avatar
        Pig_Iron

        I hate to admit it, but you’re right.
        :-(

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          I just purchased a leftover 2019 Challenger RT with a stick. I asked what the deal was with 2019’s on sale this late in the year he shrugged and said nobody buys sticks. There were 2 others. All sticks.

          Then there is my Fiesta ST. That car is proof internet forums are full of it. Thia is exactly the car people said “if they’d just build a car like this, I’d buy it.” Well they didn’t. I’ll give them a pass since the regular Fiestas with the auto were such flaming piles but anyone that does their homework knows the ST had none of the standard cars issues.

          Bottom line, car enthusiasts always talk about what they want to buy, but when an automakers screws up and gives it to them, they buy the Rav-4 their wife wants.

          Cara like you describe are thin on the ground because very few of us show up to put their money where their mouth is. I think small truck types are the only ones that are worse. “Hey, here is that truck you’ve been asking for”. “Well you know, it is perfect but the bed was 3 millimeters too tall so that is a deal breaker for sure so I’ll have to keep my 89 S10 that I was going to keep anyway because I am a skinflint that was never going to buy new anyway.

          Carmakers don’t listen to internet enthusiasts because it would bankrupt them to cater to your nonsense. The few of us that actually will buy these vehicles end up at dealers hundreds of miles away that got stuck with a couple enthusiast models in exchange for being allocated a few extra crossovers.

          If you want a freaking truck out of the 70s go buy one. You can restore it into a wonderful driver for less than a new one. But they don’t build manual straight sixes anymore because you people would find a reason to not buy them either.

          My truck is a wonderful 2015 F150 XLT Supercrew. It is so much better in every way than any of those 70s or 80s rigs I ever owned. It’s honestly the best road tripper in the fleet if my 6 foot plus kids are on the trip and if I had to keep one vehicle in the fleet it would win no contest. That is why so many people buy them.

          End of rant.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Art Vandelay – Agreed. People will come up with millions of reasons not to buy something. Right now in my driveway is my 2010 F150 Supercrew 4×4. Nose to nose with it is a 1998 “Jelly bean” F150 extended cab 6.5 box 4×4. It isn’t that much smaller than my F150. There is also a 1996 F150 reg cab 8 ft. box next to my shop. Dimensionally it isn’t much different than mine is. (Well, if you ignore the 9 inch lift and 35’s).
            My F150 is superior to everything I’ve ever owned. Like you, my two 6 ft tall sons have plenty of room in it. My 3 dogs;77 lb lab; 100 lb newfie pup; and 12 lb cockapoo all have plenty of room.
            I’ve gone on vacations alone in it. So what? My little motorcycle in the box, camping gear etc in the box and stuff I want to keep dry and safe in the cab. The perfect set up!

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            At the end of the day people’s anti-pickup rants gel down to no matter what you drive if you arent using 100 percent of that vehicle’s capability then you should be taking mass transit because you are wasting resources.

            All you smart, sophisticated types with your wagons? I had better see multiple dogs in the back every time you drive it. Sometimes my truck is empty. This may be because I am on the way to get something, my back hurts and I didn’t feel like cramming into the Fiesta, or because I felt like driving it.

            i will say this with respect to “intended purposes”…I will lay money down that in the 2 weeks I’ve had the Challenger it has seen more track time than 99 percent of the sophisticated sports car owners that routinely gripe about this fact on here.

            But a Teluride…We NEED that. GTFOH.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    And here I shun crew cabs for the exact same reason I shun sedans–two many doors.

  • avatar
    Carrera

    First time I’ve seen crew cab pick ups on a large scale, was in early 1990s in Europe. By large scale I mean, only the railroad crews owned them in Florida ( with removable train wheels) while in Europe were present somewhat. Of course the brands they had there were Nissan Navara ( Frontier), Mitsubishi Triton, and Toyota Hilux. All were crew cabs. At that time in USA my dad owned a 1992 Toyota Pickup Xtracab (pre Tacoma) which was useless at transporting people in the back seat more than 4 foot high. I was talking to my dad and he agreed that he would have bought a crew cab in a heart beat if we had them available. If I remember correctly, the Chevy S10 was the first midsize in USA that made the crew cabs popular. And honestly, they are overall quite useful. Honestly, it will be my next vehicle. I could get an SUV but if I am to haul air in the back seat, I might as well haul air in the bed too. At least for the 4-5 times per year I need a pick up truck for household stuff, I don’t have to curse, put the seats down in the SUV, clean it afterwards, worry that I scratched the interior…And yes, it will be a crew cab . I know the new Xtra can full size trucks don’t compare with my dad’s 1992 Toyota, but I don’t want my two kids to cramp themselves back there. If I was a single man with a shotgun and a dog, may be an Xtracab would have been enough

  • avatar

    Now some of the reason these are popular are obvious. But I see more and more real work and fleet trucks in crew cab form then ever before. I’m curious if resale plays some part in it. Even the road construction crews seem to have white crew cabs (in lowest possible trim). My town has 3 telecom company field offices in it and, while vans still make up the majority of their fleets crew cab pickups with work caps on them are becoming more and more common. The other day I noticed one had taken delivery of a number of tradesman crew cab 2500 rams.

    • 0 avatar
      Drew8MR

      Now, if I could get a crew cab with a partition(think regular cab with a box behind) and the rear doors with no windows I might reconsider my stance, because you’d get a little more flexibility that way. You can’t keep tools in the back seat of a normal truck, not where I live and work.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        I’d say you need to find a new place to live and work if you can’t keep tools in the back seat of a locked and alarmed pickup, the majority of the time anyway. Either way it will stop the low effort criminals that will take something out of the open bed of a pickup.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        My F-150 supercab is a panel van with a bed. Best of both worlds I guess. The Hotshot trade uses crew cabs for the sleeper and camping gear. Plus they get better resale value, since many are dumping them on the market with just 50 to 80K miles every 3 to 5 months.

    • 0 avatar

      I have seen a number of single guys with slide in truck campers who do make themselves dividers and racks where the back seat of their crew cab was. Seems photography hunting or fishing equipment are the most common reason.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @mopar4wd – In some cases changes in safety rules means that dangerous work can’t be done alone. Anything close to the public or traffic requires flaggers to keep the public clear of the workers.
      The telephone company in my town just picked up a fleet of F150 extended and regular cab 4×4’s with utility canopies along with Transit vans. Another reason why companies buy pickups is because you can’t get 4×4 vans. Other than the Sprinter, I don’t know of any factory ones.

  • avatar
    Ryannosaurus

    Even with fleet orders regular cabs are going away. I do the fleet order for a timber company and the number of extended cabs as a percent of the mix is steadily rising. Of the 23 trucks we received this year, only 5 are regular cabs. Used to be only managers would get an extended cab, now they have moved on to crew cabs and extended cabs are the norm.

    I also ordered our first Ford Ranger (isn’t even offered in regular cab) for the same price as a basic F-150. If the crews like them, we may switch out all of our regular cabs for extended cab Rangers.

  • avatar
    3800FAN

    Dad trucks people! Its all about dad trucks. I see it all the time with my kids fathers. Fact- aftet discounts a ram 1500 crew cab longhorn 4wd etorque v6 can be had for less than a honda pilot exl awd and gets equal or better mpg. Same goes for an f150 xlt crew cab 2.7 4wd. Most familys have 2 kids and dont need seating for 8 in dads car. Its dads in a midlife crisis. I might join them soon.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Lol…my crew cab pickup is the only vehicle I own that is not a response to my midlife crisis. They are highly versatile do it all vehicles. In spite of all the stereotypes and smarmy comments from the “I drive the automotive equivalent of wearing sweat pants to Wal Mart” brigade, people buy them because at the end of the day if dad has a pickup and mom a crossover, you have really met every automotive need a normal family is ever going to encounter.

    • 0 avatar
      SSJeep

      Im in the market for a new truck, and a Honda has not even crossed my radar. And its for the reasons you list above plus the lack of towing ability and the unibody. The Ridgeline is a cool truck in concept but falls short on the above.

      Stay away from the e-torque, just get the Hemi without e-torque. Less stuff to break.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    As I said when the whole virus and lock down started it is the low priced segment that will take the biggest hit. This is just more of that. The only people who buy regular cab pickups are cheap skates the most likely people to stay away in times of economic uncertainly.

    Fleets have been moving away from regular cabs for years. They may not use the back seat for people but they certainly use them for dry lockable storage.

    • 0 avatar
      Drew8MR

      Or, here in SoCal, landscapers and the like. You don’t want a bunch of dirty gas powered tools in a van, and why tow a trailer all day unless you absolutely have to? It’s a pretty specific niche where you need more than 2 guys on every job (where a crew cab towing a trailer makes perfect sense)in my experience. Like if all you did was large apartment complexes or whatever. Anyway, I’d think the bare bones work trucks will linger on in some format at least.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      The regular cab buyers aren’t necessarily cheapskates. They may be the same people, or type, who bought Rancheros and El Caminos.

      They’re not going to haul much of anything, but if they’re going to the hardware store, they don’t have room to drop off the kids and Mother-in-Law somewhere, and get some alone time away from them.

      Not every guy has a man cave, or a workshop in the back of the garage for precious alone time. Women thrive on family time. Men need some breathing room once in awhile, and a regular cab, like the old El Camino, provides it.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I have a crew midsize pickup and I can count on one hand in 12 years of ownership the times I have used the back seat when driving. I would rather have an extended cab but since I want a compact pickup like the Ford Maverick which will only come in a crew cab when introduced late next year I will likely compromise and buy one. I will likely buy the base model since I have a fully loaded Buick Lacrosse and Honda CRV. All I really want is a 2 wheel drive no frills truck that is smaller. I will most likely get a bed extender to get the extra bed space. I want something smaller and like Vulpine has stated in the past I want something smaller and easier to reach in the bed and to get in especially since my wife no longer can get in high vehicles due to physical issues.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    Lots of ’em have hard tonneau covers. F-150 Platinum + tonneau cover = Lincoln Town Car.

  • avatar
    Twist0ff

    This is more an indication that the Dealers are making us buy the four door variations. How many ppl order their cars anymore?

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    “America shuns non-crew cabs…”

    The writing on this site is cringeworthy.

    How about: “America embraces crew cabs…”

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    Funny, I was just on Toyota’s website today trying to build an extra cab Tacoma. The number of options unavailable was really strange. Like, you can’t get blue or black in certain trim levels on the Toyota website. How is it not available when you are building it on the manufacturer’s site? You were limited to the 2020s, so maybe they have stopped producing them and they know what’s left out there.

    Either way, I was determined to build a Marty McFly special and it came to $40k for the second lowest of 4 trim levels. For a truck essentially the same as the 2009 I owned and THAT generation was even a few years old by then. So that’s where that ended.

  • avatar
    Imagefont

    Ford, GM and (Fiat?) are leaving money on the table.
    Introducing the new extended crew cab pickup!!!
    Four full size doors and two jump seats behind the second row! Seats 8 in a pinch!
    Put all your mulch from Home Depot in the 3.5’ bed!

  • avatar
    Dan

    I daydream about single cabs all the time. I wish I was squeezing two feet less truck around the turns every time I’m in the woods. A 2WD RCSB with the Mustang V8 weighs 800 pounds less than my crew cab and, if internet time slips are to be believed, will run low 13s @ 103 right off the lot. That’d be a blast, of course I want one.

    But the unfortunate reality is that the other 99% of the time I’m carrying tools and groceries, it’s probably raining, and a covered trunk is non negotiable.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Still a shame I never got a crack at one of these.

    caranddriver.com/news/a15150440/2010-pontiac-g8-st-pickup-killed-car-news/

  • avatar
    slavuta

    In other car news: “Plane flies Confederate flag over NASCAR race”

  • avatar
    Mackie

    I don’t drive a truck but I live in the country, farms all around, so trucks are everywhere. The real work horses aren’t these flashy mansions on wheels—which seem to be driven mostly by retired baby boomers with more money than they know what to do with. And I NEVER see an actual crew in these crew cabs. Usually just one maybe two people.

  • avatar
    snakebit

    In my area(Carson Valley, NV near Tahoe)these things outsell SUV’s two to one, and they’re mostly driven by(to quote a Texas slogan)guys who are all hat and no cattle(state workers, dentists, and the like). I have a small SUV to climb to the lake in winter to see family, but I otherwise be behind the wheel of a passenger car. I’ve no use for a four-door overpriced truck.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @snakebit–Neither do I but they are selling like hot cakes. Just like sedans, station wagons, and mini vans they will peak and then not as many will want them. Rising prices of pickups along with more Government Regulations will eventually make buyers look for other alternatives when economy tightens and fuel prices go up. This might happen eventually but for now crew cab pickups are hot sellers. Also some will get tired of them and go to another type of vehicle. Everything goes in cycles and the popularity of sedans and mini vans continue to spiral down.

  • avatar
    gtem

    Very timely article as my wife and I are consolidating her Camry and my old 4Runner into a newer half ton….crew cab. I much prefer the aesthetics and combination of larger bed+manageable wheelbase of the extended cab+6.5 foot bed trucks, but we both agreed that this will be a family vehicle for camping trips, potentially towing a future boat, etc. The crew cab is a no-brainer. Ford does make a Supercrew+6.5 bed but I think we’ll go with the shorter 5.5, it really does make parking easier. We have our Chrysler van for the 8ft profile stuff, and even a 5.5 foot bed accomodates two yards of mulch.

    Noodling on F150s and the new Rams at the moment. Seeing basic 4WD Hemis listed for $28k(?!) if I’m willing to drive to get a deal (I am).

    • 0 avatar

      Just bought a used Pilot for my wife’s daily driver. While I owned a couple trucks I haven’t had one in about 10 years. I do have a nice 5×8 utility trailer. But I told my wife the next car for myself will probably be a crew cab pickup, the pilot can tow the utility trailer and my little boat, but I really want a camper and that will require something bigger. Plus I really miss the truck sometimes, it makes it easy to decide to stop at Lowes on the way home from work rather then making a special trip. I would prefer a long bed but really 5′ works fine for what I need.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    A 4WD Ram Hemis for 28k sounds like a really good deal. There are so many late model used trucks that are that or more with high mileage. In many cases it is worth a little more to buy new especially with a new warranty.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      Yeah I don’t know if it’s too good to be true, I read the dealer’s fine print and all I saw was a $1000 trade in allowance that was factored into that listed price. And this is for the NEW bodystyle Ram mind you, not the leftover Classic that’s still in production. Locally the best I see for a similar low trim new body Ram crew/4wd/Hemi is $38k (from MSRP of 46k). Locally a new F150 basic XLT/crew/4wd/2.7EB is around 37k, the best deals I see online have them for around 34-ish.

      • 0 avatar

        I see amazing lease deals around me on rams but hardly ever prices that low. Once I pay down the pilot, I think I’m going to target a Ram or Sierra crew cab 5′ bed. I like the canyon too, but I think the back seat is too small as my kids are growing. a coworker just got a new Colorado crew long bed as his retirement truck (bought before he retires next year) and I really dig it more then I used to.

  • avatar
    teddyc73

    I didn’t even consider a crew cab when looking at trucks. Made it more challenging to find a quad cab Ram 1500 in the color, model, and basic configuration I wanted but my perseverance paid off and I have the exact truck I wanted. I’m continually bemused by people who criticize pick up truck drivers if they think those drivers aren’t using their trucks the way they should be. As if there is a rule about owning pickups. I have one because I wanted to pull a boat which I do twice a year. Rest of the year it’s my daily driver and I just enjoy driving a big vehicle.

  • avatar
    pveezy

    People always trip out about the proliferation of pickup trucks being used as family vehicles but really you shouldn’t be surprised. Some people and families just want a traditional body on frame vehicle with a V6 or V8.

    In the 60s-80s, you could buy cars that were traditional body on frame vehicles with a V6 or V8. Government regulation and the automakers killed them all and put all the sedans and wagons onto a stretched and widened FWD economy car platform.

    So where did people go? In the 90s-2000s there was the exodus to SUVs, which were, you guessed it, mostly body on frame V6 and V8, RWD based with 4wd.

    Then what happened? Government regulation and automakers have now turned most the SUVs into FWD based CUVs sitting on the same platform with the cars.

    So people buy crew cab pickups now.

  • avatar
    whynotaztec

    I have and prefer the look of a RCLB, in my case a 2014 Silverado HD. I realize my opinion is in the distinct minority, but I know that crew cab owners should buy their trucks for the same reason I bought mine – I wanted it. Of course it helps that I can always borrow the wife or kid car if it’s better for the task at hand. But nothing like this truck when it comes to pushing snow, hauling dirt or mulch, or pulling a trailer. Or just driving to work, which is thankfully only 8 miles.
    I will say this – I find it amusing that I can bring home 16′ deck boards from Lowes, while the guy with the $50k crew cab cannot. Of course he can just have them delivered for a few bucks, but still the irony kills me.
    But again, people should buy certain types of vehicles for a very important reason – they like it.

    • 0 avatar

      I have yet to have to buy 16′ lumber yet. But interestingly a friend borrowed my trailer, to do some home improvements while stuck at home. He hauled a bunch of 16′ to build his kids a fort on my 5×8 trailer behind his suburban.

      • 0 avatar
        whynotaztec

        It was hard enough with those things hanging off the back of a straight truck, I can’t imagine the extra variable of a trailer.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          Probably if you can’t drive a stick shift, you can’t back a trailer.

          The best (scene) would be backing up a trailer with a stick shift truck into a parallel parking space on a steep grade with heavy traffic.

          But there’s something righteous about the RCLB (my next truck). It’s so cheap, they’re almost paying you to drive it.

  • avatar
    Rick Astley

    TTAC used to cover some of the glaring inadequacies of CAFE standards and the ludicrous vehicles which have been created because they achieve the goal of CAFE in a form factor which is most profitable rather than most efficient.

    One glaring issue with trucks as commuter vehicles is not their MPG, it’s their tailpipe emissions. When people migrated from cars to SUV’s (which were much easier to classify in CAFE than cars and had less emissions oversight) that was a problem.

    Using nearly-emissions-exempt trucks as commuter vehicles is possibly one of the most environmentally damaging decision that a one can make with their personal transportation. Trucks have very lax emission controls for a reason, they are hauling stuff and a necessary evil. When you use that truck to schlep yourself to your desk job, what’s the purpose?

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      You bring up excellent points, kudos. On the migration to SUVs in the 90s this was not only necessary but likely allowed because it saved Detroit who essentially lost the middle/upper middle class car market in the 80s to the Japanese. The same is being repeated here, only with pickups, which is Detroit’s chief strength since they face stiff competition in “SUVs” after the mid 00s and Asian marques caught up. In my view they will lose or already have lost this market as well. Tesla, while technically American, is not Detroit and it owns the pure EV market for the foreseeable future.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @Rick Astley – emissions were GVW based in the 70’s. That’s why we started seeing “heavy-halfs”. Instead of true 1/2 ton pickups i.e. F100, C/K 1000 everyone shifted to 150/1500’s. Voila… Manufactures did not need to worry about emissions. Even now, that is why companies aren’t bothering with regular cab compact trucks. Footprint rules mean they would have to meet more stringent mpg/emissions rules. That’s another reason why we haven’t seen pickups like the Fiat Strada.

  • avatar
    eng_alvarado90

    Personally I thought extended cab sales would have a comeback now that some automakers like GM and FCA have been building full size trucks with 4 independent doors (B pillars) for at least half a decade. Maybe we need Ford to join the party? I consider the extended cab to be the best trade-off body style nowadays since you still get a standard 6.5′ ft bed, an improved structure now that they come with B pillars and a roomy enough cab for most people. I’m 5’9″ and I can fit my family good enough on my Ram Quad Cab/Extended Cab. My dad’s F150 is also Extended Cab and works good enough (still would be better if the rear doors had their own B pillar)

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      The fly in the ointment is child seats. I researched this to death as I tried to justify sticking with a Quad cab Ram or DoubleCab GM (or SuperCab Ford but I knew that was a lost cause from the get-go). There’s simply not enough rear seat space (cushion length, or leg room) to accomodate bulky rear-facing seats well. A lot (most?) of people want to buy a truck once and have it work for family needs for years.

  • avatar
    Longshift

    At least one manufacturer will always produce regular cab full-size trucks with the long beds, because they give the best hauling bang-for-the-buck. You get an eight-foot bed for basically the same overall vehicle length as an extended cab with a six-foot bed or a crew cab with a five-foot bed. Where I live the U-Hauls and Lowes rent regular cab long bed trucks. In fact, we rented one, an F-150, last year to make runs to the landfill. It was a very comfortable, quiet, smooth-riding truck, and the price is very reasonable. I would buy a regular cab short bed with the naturally-aspirated V-6 if they were not so big.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • FreedMike: Forget about the heckblende – check that alligator-skin carriage roof! This car’s pimp had was...
  • FreedMike: I recall the part of Lee Iaccoca’s biography where he talked about his early years at Chrysler...
  • FreedMike: As I recall, “toggle” operated mirrors were pretty commonplace in those days, Arthur.
  • FreedMike: I kind of like the XE. They redid the interior for this year, and it’s a definite improvement, but I...
  • PrincipalDan: 4 barrel intake if it doesn’t already have one from the factory. Simple TBI set up. Dual exhausts...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber