By on May 24, 2020

The writing was on the wall for the last month, at least. Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection after the coronavirus pandemic sent rentals — and revenue — crashing, forcing the debt-laden company into a corner that’s proven near impossible to escape from.

One of the world’s largest car rental agencies, Hertz laid off more than 12,000 workers in March and furloughed another 4,000 before scrapping 90 percent of the new car acquisitions it had on the books for 2020. While that might have stopped some of the bleeding, the core issue remains: few people are travelling, and even fewer are renting cars.

In a release, Hertz said the voluntary filing with the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware will allow it to keep its core business and subsidiaries functioning, with $1 billion in cash on hand to fund their operation. The company’s overseas operations and franchised locations are not included in the filing.

“The impact of COVID-19 on travel demand was sudden and dramatic, causing an abrupt decline in the Company’s revenue and future bookings,” Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. said in a release.

“Hertz took immediate actions to prioritize the health and safety of employees and customers, eliminate all non-essential spending and preserve liquidity. However, uncertainty remains as to when revenue will return and when the used-car market will fully re-open for sales, which necessitated today’s action. The financial reorganization will provide Hertz a path toward a more robust financial structure that best positions the Company for the future as it navigates what could be a prolonged travel and overall global economic recovery.”

As the pandemic tool hold, Hertz, unprofitable for the past four years, found itself holding a bag of debt totaling $19 billion. Following the initial layoffs, the company sought relief from its lenders, buying it a brief reprieve. That window drew to a close on Friday, however.

“Today’s action will protect the value of our business, allow us to continue our operations and serve our customers, and provide the time to put in place a new, stronger financial foundation to move successfully through this pandemic and to better position us for the future,” said newly minted CEO Paul Stone.

What will become of Hertz’s 700,000-strong global fleet, of which 400,000 vehicles reside in the U.S., remains to be seen. The company didn’t mention reducing its inventory, just its rate of turnover.

From Bloomberg:

Analysts have warned of ramifications for the broader auto industry from a Hertz bankruptcy. The company has a fleet of about 400,000 cars in the U.S. that are not subject to repurchase agreements with vehicle manufacturers and could be liquidated, Michael Ward, an analyst at Benchmark Co., wrote in a report last week.

It seems almost unavoidable that the company will have to dump a considerable portion of its fleet onto the used-car market, further slimming down an agency that’s already reduced its workforce by half.

No one’s crystal ball predicts the future with 100 percent accuracy, but the coming months — and perhaps years — will surely see a reduction in international travel and related vehicle rentals. Meanwhile, ride-hailing services aren’t going away.

[Image: Hertz]

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85 Comments on “Nice Weekend, Ain’t It? You’re Probably Not Renting From Hertz, Though, Hence the Bankruptcy Filing...”


  • avatar
    Mike

    Not sure if this is bankruptcy related or not but the dfw Hertz car sales site is showing a lot of vehicles available for sale as of 5/28 or a little later. In particular they seem to be dumping mid sized trucks, luxury cars, and small cars. I’d hate to be selling a used Frontier right now…

  • avatar

    $17B in debt

  • avatar
    readallover

    Something tells me that Nissan used car values are going to dip. Doesn`t really matter to me, I usually use Alamo.

    • 0 avatar
      jrhmobile

      Yeah, you say that, but Enterprise Holdings has taken on a lot of debt to take on Vanguard Automotive, which owned Alamo and National Car Rental.

      It’s a private company, so the books aren’t as wide open as Hertz, but the financing to buy Vanguard and other properties was widely reported. This might be one of those rare times when the big ones fall and only the small survive.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      The Hertz US fleet is 32% Nissan. That’s a lot of Altimas.

      • 0 avatar
        Oberkanone

        And Wow Lorenzo, there is not a shred of truth to your post. Nissan financials would be much improved if Hertz purchased 180,000 Altima. Woe for Nissan they are in 6th place in sales to Hertz.

        • 0 avatar
          Lorenzo

          And wow, Oberkanone, I was joking about the Altimas. Hertz also rents Sentras, and other Nissan models.

          I wasn’t joking about 32% of their NA fleet. It’s about 25% of the US fleet, 15% of GM, 8% Ford, and only 5% of FCA. That’s as of 2018 – I couldn’t find the 2020 mix.

          Other rental agencies use their own mix of automakers, but that’s the Hertz mix. You can look it up, preferably before proclaiming “not a shred of truth”.

          You should lighten up, Obie, it’s a comment, not a post, and if you have contrary info, spit it out.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            I’m just curious where you got those figures, Lorenzo – I saw an article in C/D with very different ones.

          • 0 avatar
            Lorenzo

            FreedMike, I can’t find the pie chart breakdown I saw. I’ve found a couple others that don’t match the pie chart, or each other.

            One I found was a simple graph from Motley Fool in 2012 that lists the Hertz fleet as 47% GM, 5% Ford, “N/A” FCA, and 48% other. That was before Hertz bought out Dollar/Thrifty in 2016, and D/T was listed with its own mix.

            It’s apparent that any fleet mix cited is dependent on the year of the article, since the mix changes. Ghosn’s push to sell more Nissans is more recent than the article, and Nissan is still lumped in with “other”.

            The mix is important, if Hertz is in fleet liquidation mode, since the automakers will be facing different levels of headwinds with a lot of late model used vehicles entering the market.

            I should have cited my source – and so should Oberkanone. There are a lot of different numbers out there, and Hertz is a global company with fleets on other continents.

          • 0 avatar
            sgeffe

            Weird! Hertz and Avis used to be all Ford, National was GM, and Dollar was mostly Chrysler products! And you never saw any of them “furrin’” cars in the fleet!

            Jeebus, I’m getting old! :-p

    • 0 avatar
      Oberkanone

      Hertz US fleet 567,000 vehicles
      21% supplied by GM
      18% supplied by FCA
      12% supplied by Ford
      10% supplied by KIA
      9% supplied by Toyota
      7% supplied by Nissan
      %% supplied by Hyundai

      Reality is not your friend readallover.

  • avatar
    Tele Vision

    …*took* hold…

  • avatar
    Cicero

    I never understood Hertz’s business model. Before the era of ridesharing I rented a lot of cars. Hertz was never even close to being competitive with Alamo, Budget, Enterprise or any of the low-cost players. When marketplace travel apps make it so easy to compare prices, it seemed odd to me that anyone would ever pay a premium for something so mundane and commodity-ish as a boring rental car. My attitude was always, just get me there and back cheaply, and I don’t really care if it’s in a Nissan Versa or Kia Optima.

    Given Hertz’s four-year streak of losses, maybe I’m not the only one who wondered about this.

    • 0 avatar

      I’ve rented in a variety of places, and Hertz always was the most expensive. My guess is that they were like IBM in that no one ever got fired for placing the company account with Hertz, even if others had a better product.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        I think you’re right Hertz seem to be the corporate account rental. Two companies I worked for used Hertz exclusively. Since I wasn’t paying it didn’t matter to me. Back then their service was pretty good

        • 0 avatar
          pale ghost

          Often, what the corporate traveller sees on the bill is not the true cost to the corporations. There are yearly volume discounts and kickbacks. There was a minor scandal a while back when some of the consulting firms were billing their clients what showed up on their travelers’s bills plus a markup for overhead when their true cost after volume discounts etc. was much less.

        • 0 avatar
          randyinrocklin

          They were efficient in their check out and returns, in terms of service.

      • 0 avatar
        ect

        FWIW, I flew YTZ-IAD at the beginning of March to buy a car in VA. When I looked at rental car prices, Hertz was significantly the cheapest – which quite surprised me.

        When I was in the corporate world, I had premium status with Hertz, Avis and National. More often than not, Hertz was my first choice, because the price was right and the service superior. Typically the most expensive was National.

        Interestingly, what always got me the lowest price was the Delta Skymiles discount code. Better than my company’s discount.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    In Ontario the majority of rental car companies do not sell of their cars directly when through with them. Instead they return them to the dealerships, who then sell them or auction them.

    In the GTA over the past few days reports are that a large number of late model Kia Souls with fairly low mileage have suddenly come on the market with asking prices from $14k to $17k.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      Some rental companies have buyback agreements with the OEMs where the automaker assumes the depreciation risk and re-markets the car at the end of the prescribed term. Other agencies buy the risk themselves and re-market on their own. Enterprise is the biggest player in accepting their own “risk” and re-marketing on their own while others will do a varying mix.

  • avatar
    Drew8MR

    Lotus with autotragics? That should be a crime.

  • avatar
    Felix Hoenikker

    When I lived in the corporate life, 2 of 3 of my last companies used Hertz. I especially liked the no check in feature where you found your name on the roster and proceeded to the listed parking spot. You simply opened the door, checked the rental agreement on the front seat to make sure you had the right car and drove off.
    The rates seemed very competitive and I would use Hertz for personal travel. One year when I was constantly on the road, I qualified for super duper perks and had a free personal rental for a week. same went for airlines and hotels.
    Overseas, I rented a car for a 2 week grand tour of Italy for far less than competitors offers.
    So yes, I was a big fan of Hertz, but alas I barely ever rent cars for personal reasons anymore. When I fly somewhere, I arrange transportation beforehand and skip the rental car altogether. If other boomers are acting similarily, I can see why Hertz’s business was declining even before the Wuhan virus hit.

    • 0 avatar
      Add Lightness

      If the virus can be call Wuhan, then the coming depression can be called the US Depression.

      • 0 avatar
        jkross22

        That’s where it started. Kind of like Lyme’s disease or MERS.

        • 0 avatar

          China has a knack for introducing new shiny deadly viruses to the world every few years. How boring life would be without China. But I am afraid if US Depression is coming it will be the terminal event for China. China will be clobbered, devastated, done. End of communist China is coming! Rejoice!

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            “China has a knack for introducing new shiny deadly viruses to the world every few years.”

            Yeah, that’s one reason the Defense Intelligence Agency has the NCMI. The National Center for Medical Intelligence based out of Fort Detrick. We don’t trust China or other countries to tell us about their viruses, so we have an intelligence agency that specializes in tracking these outbreaks. I can’t beleive they didn’t pick up on SARS-CoV-2 early on. They must have been filing reports. What happened to those reports? It’ll come out some day.

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Center_for_Medical_Intelligence

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “China has a knack for introducing new shiny deadly viruses to the world every few years.”

            China has close to 1.4 billion people. That is a pretty big petri dish.

            @mcs – Canada has a team that tracks Infectious Diseases globally and apparently they discovered things going weird in China. Our military chain of command viewed that team more like the redhead stepchild and the report fell on deaf ears. Politicians also didn’t see much of a threat from the outbreak in China.

    • 0 avatar
      Peter Gazis

      Felix Hoenikker

      I believe the latest Microsoft update will protect the information on your computer from the Wuhan virus. You should download it immediately.

  • avatar
    gasser

    I have a good friend who travels regularly to Los Angeles to visit his two daughters who live there. He was a regular Hertz renter. One day he realized that between hotel parking charges and valet parking at restaurants, he was paying a fortune for a rental car. Since then he only uses Uber. Uber was rumored to have taken away 15% of the LAX rental business last year.
    For me, the end of Hertz was the crappy condition of Hertz rentals that I got at Chicago’s O’Hare. I switched to Enterprise and have stayed with them for years. Lots of free upgrades and perks.
    Enterprise + Uber = No Hertz…….

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      Hertz went tier 2 for me when they tried to convince me that a Chevy Trax was a midsize SUV. They went on to rent me a RAV-4 with a broken driver seat.

      They should have just been honest they didn’t have any midsizers left and provided a more valid alternative.

    • 0 avatar
      Imagefont

      I was doing some work in Seattle recently. I had to pay to park at my hotel, then pay to park near the job site. These extra costs start to make things like Uber look very attractive.
      In San Francisco about two years ago street parking at a parking meter was $1.25 per minute. A minute!!! The meter had a $30 / 24 minute maximum. I can’t eat that fast!!! I walked everywhere, that’s still free, for now.

    • 0 avatar
      SaulTigh

      I flew to LA last September and got into town a good 36 hours before the rest of my party so I had some time to kick around. I used Uber rather than rent a car and it was glorious. Nothing like being dropped off at the front door of places, and then summoning a new ride only when you’re ready to leave. Also gave me time to gawk without having to pay attention to where I’m going or other drivers.

      I wanted to get some bottled water and supplies on the way back and a $20 was all it took to convince the driver to stop at a grocery store and wait for 20 minutes. He even helped me unload at the hotel.

      Spent about $200 on Uber rides while I was there and considered it to be well worth it for the sheer convenience.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    …unprofitable for the past four years…

    The end.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Eight years ago, Hertz bought Dollar-Thrifty for $2.3 billion. That gave them a piece of the low cost rental market. Apparently, it wasn’t the right piece.

  • avatar
    don1967

    Cheerleaders of the lockdown will rightfully point out Hertz’s spotty financial performance prior to the lockdown.

    Problem is, the same argument can be made of airlines, restaurants, and many other businesses which collectively employ a good chunk of the population. So be careful what you wish for.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      Don, I really hope you get out today and really mix it up with others who think like you, really show those “Cheerleaders of the lockdown” a thing or two.

    • 0 avatar
      Oberkanone

      Hertz long term debt increased from 0.05 billion US to 15.7 billion US.
      Hertz lost money each of the past 4 fiscal years.

      Hertz on the path to bankruptcy before pandemic.

      don, I’d wish for Hendrick Camaro, Z06 or Shelby Mustang from Hertz.

      • 0 avatar
        randyinrocklin

        @Ober, #MeToo.

      • 0 avatar
        don1967

        Me too Ober… although maybe with an extended warranty.

        We agree that Hertz’s problems go back several years. But it’s the lockdown that triggered the timing of this and many other bankruptcies, thus “steepening the curve” of the economic crisis.

        That’s the irony of it all; the blind spot which currently afflicts so many people.

      • 0 avatar
        MRF 95 T-Bird

        I’ve been a Hertz Gold Club member for years and have always been satisfied with their service. A couple of summers ago on vacation in the Rockies I rented a Challenger RT Hemi from them for less than a base Mustang or Camaro which surprised me since I didn’t think they offered them, only the base SXT.

    • 0 avatar
      Peter Gazis

      don1967
      Cheerleaders?
      100,000 Americans Dead and Counting.

      If it saves American lives, I would rock the miniskirt & Pom-Poms.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      So if someone points out facts, they’re cheerleaders of the lockdown?

      Thanks for playing Don. That glue’s not gonna sniff itself.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        “That glue’s not gonna sniff itself.”

        You mean, “That Lysol isn’t going to drink itself”

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        It’s old-school “conservative” rhetoric, jk…to wit:

        1) If you think women should have the right to get an abortion if they want, you’re “pro-death,” even if you would never have one yourself.

        2) If you’re pro-gay rights, then “pro-gay,” even if you’re hetero.

        3) It you think people should have the right to take brain-dead family members off of life support, you’re “pro-euthanasia,” even if you wouldn’t do it yourself.

        And so on and so forth. Stupid dittohead crap that way too many folks bought into, mainly because it doesn’t require the use of a functioning mind.

        (Then again, considering that so-called “leftists” have gone to arguments like “if you vote from Trump you are against womens’ rights,” the infection of stupid has clearly spread.)

        • 0 avatar
          jkross22

          Mike, good examples. To your point, stupidity is the real contagion.

          I like what David Webb said recently about this…. if someone brings to you better facts (meaning more accurate ones) than the ones you have, it’s time for a look in the mirror.

          Instead of that, most just double down on stupid – i.e. their own tribe.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Exactly. Too many use ideology as a shortcut for thinking. I’d say this is true of the “left” as well as the “right,” though the latter seems far more prone to it.

            I think the absence of left-wing Rush Limbaughs illustrates this nicely. Are there left-wing “dittoheads” out there? Yes, but not enough of them to generate much of a Nielsen rating.

  • avatar
    jmo2

    It’s interesting to compare Hertz with Lehman Brothers. Back in mid March Barclay’s offered to throw Hertz a lifeline. The former GE executive CEO (I know right?) said the terms were too harsh so she turned down the offer. Just like Lehman turned down the offer from the Korean Development Bank. And we know what happened to both at the hands of their arrogant leaders. Bankruptcy.

    It also appears that Hertz leadership didn’t even know their lease terms. For a retail lease, if the car is worth less than expected at the end of the lease, the lessor eats the loss. With Hertz, if the value of the vehicles fell at any time during the period of the lease Hertz had to post cash collateral.

    It would be like you leasing an Altima for $229/month and being offered a deal where the lease was $209/month but if at any time the lease became “under water” you had to write a check for the difference.

    Another win for “former GE” executives.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    This is fantastic news! This means that the lockdown is working! It’s wonderful to have major businesses going bankrupt because we forced people to stay home for no legitimate reason and based on extremely flawed modeling that even the Cuomo the lib admitted wasn’t even close to being right.

    We’ve also found out recently that Fauci and Co are now stating that the lockdown is going to have untold consequences if it continues and that of all the countries in the world, the great United States of America’s was the MOST PREPARED for this Corona cold.

    It really is a burden to be right all the time. Thankfully many here won’t ever get to experience that feeling.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      “we forced people to stay home for no legitimate reason”

      Well, um, maybe to keep from getting very sick and dying, but heh, whats a 100k dead people when Hertz has cars to rent, huh?

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        @EBFlatearth,

        If the US had Sweden’s death rate, that’s 130K Americans dead. That doesn’t adjust for high density demographics, where death rates ramp up exponentially.

        But I get it. Those lucky 30K Americans saved pay the least taxes, soak up the most benefits. Like your parents.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        The problem isn’t that the lockdown happened, it is that it was sold to people as “flatten the curve”. Then they just kept on with it. And then they extended the whole “essential” tag to things like NASCAR because of the economic impact.

        Imagine you run a small businesses in North Carolina and the government tells you you can’t open, but then declares NASCAR essential.

        30 percent or so are unemployed. That is a problem. They have been forced to choose between ruin or maybe getting sick with something they will likely survive. Gee, I wonder what they’ll choose.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        The problem isn’t that the lockdown happened, it is that it was sold to people as “flatten the curve”. Then they just kept on with it. And then they extended the whole “essential” tag to things like NASCAR because of the economic impact.

        Imagine you run a small businesses in North Carolina and the government tells you you can’t open, but then declares NASCAR essential.

        30 percent or so are unemployed. That is a problem. They have been forced to choose between ruin or maybe getting sick with something they will likely survive. Gee, I wonder what they’ll choose.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Why is NASCAR more “essential” than Mom and Pop’s Corner Store? That’s easy – the former has more money to grease elected officials’ palms with than the latter.

          Like all other things in American politics: follow the money.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      “the great United States of America’s was the MOST PREPARED”

      100k dead isn’t a sign of preparedness.

      Influenza USA 12,000 – 61,000 deaths annually since 2010.

      “The death rate from influenza in Canada is 500 to 1500 cases per year.”

      6,424 COVID-19 deaths from the disease in Canada.
      (4 – 13 times more deadly than the flu)

      99,459 COVID-19 disease deaths in USA.
      (1.6 – 8 times more deadly than the flu)

      “Corona cold”

      M.A.G.A.

      M.aking A.merican G.raves A.ccessible

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      Bwhahahaha. The Hysterics everyone! They’ve finally crawled out of the woodwork. The power I yield is immense.

      It’s funny that you call me a flat earther when YOU are the one that deny the facts right in front of your face.

      I know none of you would acknowledge that Cuomo acknowledged that everyone failed at Corona cold predictions.

      https://www.foxnews.com/politics/cuomo-we-all-failed-coronavirus-projections-new-york

      I knew none of you would acknowledge that Fauci has said that extended lockdowns will cause irreparable harm:

      https://www.businessinsider.com/anthony-fauci-irreparable-damage-stay-at-home-too-long-2020-5

      And I knew none of you would acknowledge (other than the Canadian who thinks he’s a comedian) that the Greatest country in the world, the United States of America, was found to be the most prepared for this pandemic. Not surprised you didn’t see it though. I’m sure the media outlets that have brainwashed you wouldn’t show something that makes the US look good. This isn’t even a recent development. How did you not know this?:

      https://www.ghsindex.org/

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @EBFlucked – I take it you didn’t read the whole news article.

        Fauci:
        “Now is the time, depending upon where you are and what your situation is, is to begin seriously looking at reopening the economy, reopening the country to try and get back to some degree of normal,” he said.”

        Please note the “depending on” part.

        “Fauci said that trying to reopen the US too soon would result in “needless suffering and death” from a new wave of coronavirus infections.”

        The USA WAS prepared but King Chloroquine fired the experts who worked in China for the CDC. That happened right before China had their outbreak.

        He also fired most of the Pandemic Team in 2018.
        ( In May 2018, President Donald Trump’s biodefense preparedness adviser warned that a flu pandemic was the country’s No. 1 health security threat, and the U.S. was not prepared.)

        King Chloroquine isn’t a leader. He isn’t even a good business man.

        My normal response would be to laugh at you but since lives are being lost due to incompetence, I just feel pity.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          @LouBC:

          “King Chloroquine isn’t a leader. He isn’t even a good business man.”

          Why do you think he’s fighting tooth and nail to keep his tax returns from becoming public? I bet they’ll prove him to either be far less wealthy than he says he is, or that he’s been loopholing his way to a zero tax bill since 1990.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        EB, you’re dumb as a box of rocks…

        … Oh, and Fords RULE! :)

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          @EB, Yeah no kidding Sherlock. We knew the lockdown wouldn’t benefit the economy. Preserving human lives was the whole point, only point. Anything else was secondary, as it should be.

          Those experts arguing lockdown end dates aren’t arguing original lockdown merits.

          No, that’s only those not concerned with obvious facts, no different than the Flat Earth community.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            “Preserving human lives ”

            … or, what the White House now refers to as “human capital stock”.

          • 0 avatar
            bobbysirhan

            Democrat governors are literally murdering nursing home residents to drive this narrative because their voters are too deranged to figure out that is what is going on. Stop the name calling. You have nobody to look down on.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Hi, Bobby, have you met my box of dumb rocks? Climb in they’ve been looking for you

          • 0 avatar
            jkross22

            @ Bobby,

            How many have you helped in nursing homes? You seem concerned so I just assumed you’re doing all you can to stop the murdering. As a caring person who wants to help, how much of your time or money or both have you donated to help those in that situation?

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @bobbysirhan:

            Spend the 10 rubles you earned from Smolensk Collective Troll Farm #2212 well, Comrade.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @BobbySirhan – troll comments from a guy whose blog name is an amalgam of “Bobby” Robert Kennedy and his killer Sirhan Sirhan.

            I’m not even American and spotted the stupidity.

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            CDC confirmed today that the Corona Cold has an extremely low mortality rate of 0.004%.

            Once again it’s almost a burden being right all the time:

            https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/planning-scenarios-h.pdf

            Page 4, scenario 5.

            What say you hysterical, agenda driven, liberal sheep?

          • 0 avatar
            bobbysirhan

            My two choices are volunteer at a nursing home or get in line and vote for a Democrat who will send COVID patients to kill nursing home residents? Are you insane? I was wrong about Trump. I have the strength of character to admit it. What is wrong with all of you who make nonsense arguments to justify the evil you’re still supporting?

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            ^^ The stupid name you chose as a handle tells me you’re full of BS and all you’re interested in is “sticking it to the libs”

            … and as far as you voting, those machines are really hard to work, so we won’t worry about that

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    Well that went left pretty fast. Anyway, I have mostly rented from Hertz over the past 8 years after moving to FL from NC 11 years ago. For some reason I get really reasonable rates from them compared to other companies. Also of note I always rent from the airport since its open earlier and later than the free standing stores. Since I rent by the week I would get a corporate even though I did not rent through my company. I am getting 300S models for less than 200 bucks for a full seven days.

  • avatar
    whynotaztec

    Yes this did go off the rails quickly, any story in relation to the virus is going to stir up the debates. Funny that no matter how right and perfectly logical one side is, the other side never changes their mind.

    Anyhow I hope Hertz survives for the sake of the employees. sure they will find other jobs, but I have been there and don’t care for that whole process.

    and I am still a little peeved at Hertz for not renting me that ZHZ Vette in Boston 10 years ago. Even if maybe I did not see the fine print.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Hertz rented Vettes in Boston??? No wonder they’re in bankruptcy. Sure, most people renting cars there are from out of town, but the streets in Boston are filled with Boston drivers. And they drive on streets that were laid out by meandering cows a couple centuries ago. That’s no place to drive a Vette!

  • avatar
    HotPotato

    They are letting some pretty nice cars go pretty cheap. The only bummer is they all have either a) the rental-spec engine (avast, ye scurvy GM 1.5T) or b) high miles (how the hell do you put 70k miles on the exact Mazda I’d buy in a little over a year?…makes me wonder if the “oil changes” consisted of resetting the oil-change light before handing it to the next customer).

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  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber