By on March 25, 2020

The UAW has announced the death of two Fiat Chrysler factory workers who contracted the novel coronavirus, extending sympathies while urging members to exercise safe practices during the ongoing health crisis. With COVID-19 infections ramping up across Europe and the United States, this was to be expected. The deaths are simply the first known to impact autoworker union members directly.

FCA declined to offer the names of the men, citing a respect for privacy. For our purposes, we’re only interested in their places of business, noticing the facilities where the two individuals worked — FCA’s truck plant in Sterling Heights, MI and transmission facility in Kokomo, IN — previously reported cases of employees contracting the virus. 

Fiat Chrysler Automobiles closed its North American assembly plants last week for at least the remainder of this month. At the time, it had previously idled its facility in Sterling Heights after an employee reportedly contracted the new coronavirus. There were also reports of contagion at the Kokomo site, with at least one worker testing positive on March 12th.

According to Automotive News, the UAW recently shared news of a third death — this time from the Warren Truck Assembly Plant near Detroit, though the union said it wasn’t clear that the employee had actually contracted the virus, just that they were being treated for similar symptoms before passing away.

In a letter to members, UAW President Rory Gamble briefly noted the loss of life before shifting to the game plan put in place to avoid future tragedies. This deals largely with union victories in getting other manufacturers and suppliers to finally shut down plants or extend closures already in effect:

We had some other positive news today. Working with the Ford Motor Company, we got the announcement that they will not be reopening plants on March 30, as was originally planned, due to numerous stay-at-home orders from government officials. We commend Ford for this action. FCA has told us that they intend to comply with Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer’s order and have no plans to reopen on March 30. We are waiting to hear from GM and are demanding that they put our members’ safety first and adhere to government and health officials’ recommendations to stay-at-home. We will keep you updated.

In another positive development, the UAW and Ford Motor Company will be collaborating to find ways to help improve and protect lives across the country during this crisis. And, news from the UAW GM department announced a collaboration with the company to produce much needed ventilators to help save lives.

He closed by commending employees from all sectors who had to stay on the front lines to keep essential services operational in the United States, adding that the UAW would do everything in its power to keep everyone safe and slow the spread of the virus. It’s unlikely these will be the only UAW deaths reported.

The swift outbreaks that took place in Italy and Spain could foreshadow what the United States may endure if proper precautions aren’t taken. Though it could be argued that neither European country understood the seriousness of the situation before it was too late, Italy, which has also closed down all non-essential business, has reported the most coronavirus-related deaths of any nation in the world.

By contrast, China appears to be fairing rather well and now has fewer reported deaths than either of the suffering nations in Europe — despite it having more total cases and serving as the point of origin for COVID-19. However, that’s dependent on your preferred news sources. Many outlets seem to take China’s figures at face value, occasionally praising its aggressive response — albeit less so lately. Others claim the real numbers should be much higher and point to a string of governmental coverups stretching back before January.

Ideally, reliable data would have helped other nations better prepare for seemingly inevitable outbreaks, but that’s difficult to quantify or guarantee without the benefit of hindsight. The current reality is that countless industries must now make last minute plans as governments around the world scramble to come up with a solution. And it’s probably what we should be focused upon. For now, the automotive sector is operating (or more accurately not operating) in a fog of uncertainty. Workers want to work, but not get sick, and manufacturers want them building cars without spreading disease.

Sadly, those options appear to be mutually exclusive for the time being.

[Image: James R. Martin/Shutterstock]

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65 Comments on “UAW Reports Death of Two FCA Factory Employees With Coronavirus...”


  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2020/03/gm-pads-wallet-to-weather-coronavirus-storm/#comment-9888974

    @thelaine: Yep, call all those auto workers back to the plant ASAP, and let’s get this economy moving!

    Hey, 1% of a 10,000-worker factory is only 100 people gone, so it’s OK because we can hire others who need jobs. Unemployment solved!

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      man, I read that link he posted. the comments are a sight to behold. I’m amazed at how many people believe that “the dissenting voice is ALWAYS right.” I think they watch too much TV.

    • 0 avatar
      C5 is Alive

      “Hey, 1% of a 10,000-worker factory is only 100 people gone, so it’s OK because we can hire others who need jobs. Unemployment solved!”

      Bleeding heart sarcasm aside, this is actually a thoroughly rational approach to the situation. Those 100 deaths would of course be tragedies for their families and friends; for the rest of us, though, a rounding error in the grand scheme of things.

      None of us are going to get out of here alive, folks. No matter what we do, some will exit sooner than others – if not from COVID-19 (likely) then from any one of thousands of other things that can kill us. I’d prefer to have a functioning economy and country while me and mine are still around.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        As we car types used to say “you can pay me now, or you can pay me later”. Knowing that in the long term it was better to ‘pay now’, rather than wait, prolong the agony and have a much higher bill.

        Economies can recover quickly from complete shutdowns and closures. Witness Germany and Japan after WWII.

        Russia after the Civil War.

        However if the ‘pandemic’ is drawn out over months and months, then everyone will suffer and the recovery will be postponed. Not to mention the possible deaths and illnesses. Reports are of permanent lung damage among some survivors.

        Whereas emulating the South Koreans and going full shutdown for a shorter period should provide for a shorter period of ‘economic suffering’ and a quicker, more robust recovery.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          “Witness Germany and Japan after WWII.
          Russia after the Civil War.”

          Those examples are not especially reassuring.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            Why not.

            The Japanese had an ‘economic miracle’ with non-stop economic growth from 1946 to 1991. Allowing them to become a manufacturing powerhouse.

            Germany’s economy took about 2 years to recover from total devastation and production quadrupled over the next 10 years. Allowing it to become the ‘economic engine’ of Western Europe.

            Regardless of shutdowns/quarantines/isolation, the economic downturn caused by the current pandemic will be in no way as devastating as the situation that Japan and Germany found themselves in after WWII.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “Why not.”

            Because two of them were strictly occupied nations during their recovery, one of them was actually split in half, and one of them became an entirely different thing.

            If this does cause another “Great Depression” (and it might not) then history doesn’t imply that there won’t be *very large* changes in store for the world.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            @ajla, those conditions were a result of the war. How do they have anything to do with our discussion?

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @Arthur: Germany and Japan had a sugar daddy named Uncle Sam to fund their rebuilding.

        • 0 avatar
          Dan

          “Whereas emulating the South Koreans and going full shutdown for a shorter period should provide for a shorter period of ‘economic suffering’ and a quicker, more robust recovery.”

          The window for massive shutdowns containing the epidemic closed in February. Korea was doing more at 150 cases than we are at 60,000.

          Shutdowns are buying an extra month to get the economic supports in and the emergency services a little less unready for what’s about to hit them.

          This is going to be a bad spring. It’s going to be a really bad summer.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        there it is, folks: FYIGM in one comment.

        • 0 avatar
          C5 is Alive

          “there it is, folks: FYIGM in one comment.”

          Again I’ll note how common it is for those with Leftist proclivities to elevate individual tragedies to national crises. I’ll also point out they seldom do so for wholly altruistic reasons.

          Neither of us is under any obligation to care if the other lives or dies, JimZ. And neither of us are particularly likely to die from COVID-19.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            @C5: You stated that “Neither of us is under any obligation to care if the other lives or dies.”

            Well then why do we have emergency responders (police, fire, ambulance)? Why do we have a military? Why do we even have doctors or hospitals.

            It seems that you have neither moral nor religious convictions and would prefer that we revert to some sort of hermit like existence.

          • 0 avatar
            C5 is Alive

            “Well then why do we have emergency responders (police, fire, ambulance)? Why do we have a military? Why do we even have doctors or hospitals.”

            Because, Arthur, the laws of civilized society dictate that we should of course make reasonable attempts to preserve lives. It is not reasonable to destroy our nation and our economy to do so.

            “It seems that you have neither moral nor religious convictions and would prefer that we revert to some sort of hermit like existence.”

            I’m a pragmatist first. And, quite the opposite to a “hermit like existence,” I think society should return to as near-normal as possible and we then roll the dice on the outcome.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “I’m a pragmatist first. And, quite the opposite to a “hermit like existence,” I think society should return to as near-normal as possible and we then roll the dice on the outcome.”

            and when “rolling the dice on the outcome” leads to an outcome 150x worse than what we’re doing now, what then? What excuse will you pull out of your rectum to justify that?

            You’re not a “pragmatist.” you’re just a self-absorbed jackhole.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Loving this line of “reasoning” from C5…”the economy is destroyed.”

            Funny thing, I still have money in the bank, a retirement account, plenty to eat, a car and plenty of gas to run it with, and a roof over my head. Heck, I can even run up about a hundred large in credit card debt if I want to.

            Clearly this is all evidence of a destroyed economy.

            C5 keeps saying I’m hysterical. He’s wrong…he’s the hysterical one…hysterical, as in funny as hell. Keep it coming, bro…I need the laughs.

      • 0 avatar
        EGSE

        “for the rest of us, though, a rounding error in the grand scheme of things.”

        “I’d prefer to have a functioning economy and country while me and mine are still around.”

        Alright! Awesome.

        Here’s your opportunity to lead by example. You know, step up there big boy. You first. If it helps, I’ll hold your beer. I’d be delighted to.

        • 0 avatar
          C5 is Alive

          EGSE, I’m still working and providing for me and mine. I’m also taking reasonable precautions to limit contact with others, particularly at-risk segments of the population.

          I’m able to quite easily work from home; however, other aspects of living life are that much more difficult in the present, largely hysteria-driven global environment. So, thanks for that.

          • 0 avatar
            EGSE

            “I’m able to quite easily work from home; however, other aspects of living life are that much more difficult in the present, largely hysteria-driven global environment.”

            So, it’s an inconvenience to you that we’re taking precautions to save the lives of others. Got it.

          • 0 avatar
            C5 is Alive

            It’s more than a mere “inconvenience” that we’re destroying our economy, which could very well be the death knell for our nation. Do you care at all about the longer term ramifications from the present course of action?

          • 0 avatar
            EGSE

            “do you care at all about the longer term ramifications from the present course of action?”

            Yes, I do. And I don’t accord you the wisdom to know what the correct course of action is. That’s why we have subject matter experts in the relevant fields. And you act as if it’s an either/or choice; I don’t.

            Your repeated “me and mine” comment belies any altruistic notions you claim for the larger body politic; it instead shows a self-centered “me first” attitude. That’s not good citizenship by any measure. Do you feel that good citizenship is a hallmark of “Leftism”?

            How would you respond if someone stated that one of the “mine” was to be sacrificed for the greater good? Would you approve?

          • 0 avatar
            C5 is Alive

            “How would you respond if someone stated that one of the “mine” was to be sacrificed for the greater good? Would you approve?”

            Of course not, and I would take appropriate measures to prevent that, as is my own individual responsibility to “mine.”

            However, the more relevant question to our conversation is whether I would expect that to honestly matter to you, an otherwise completely disinterested party, one way or another.

          • 0 avatar
            EGSE

            “However, the more relevant question to our conversation is whether I would expect that to honestly matter to you, an otherwise completely disinterested party, one way or another.”

            Well, you have it wrong in stating I’m a “completely disinterested party” and now we’ve established how you can’t understand why someone else should care. Yes, it does matter to me because, to quote John Donne, no man is an island. By caring about the people around me it strengthens the community I live in which benefits me as well. To that end I was a volunteer EMT/FF for over a decade so I put my “money” where my mouth is and that illuminates one difference between you and me.

            I find it quite interesting that you appear to be empathetically bankrupt, a curious and rather disturbing lack of concern for other people not closely associated with you. Where did you get this from?

            And you also seem to ascribe one of the most-valued characteristics of American society, a cohesive bond between yourself and our citizenry as a cold political belief, a bond you regard as having no value if it doesn’t directly benefit “me and mine”. Is this an accurate description? I’m just trying to plumb the depths of your values so I can better understand where you’re coming from.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “Do you care at all about the longer term ramifications from the present course of action?”

            Yes.

            Do you believe your course of action will have less harm? If so, what evidence do you have to support that? Other than “shouty guy on Fox News says so,” that is.

          • 0 avatar
            EGSE

            @JimZ

            Actually C5 is a sociopath. He ticks all the boxes. It just took a few back-and-forths to draw it out of him.

            He cares only about himself.
            He displays no empathy for anyone else.
            He rationalizes his beliefs as better than those that don’t align with his.
            He exemplifies the “I’m OK, You’re not OK” viewpoint in regard to others. That allows him to justify actions that benefit him without regard to how they affect others.
            And he’s willing to engage with others, without shame (remember, he’s always right in his mind) to describe his sociopathic beliefs as the one right way to life.

            These characteristics are sine qua non for some of the most cold, ruthless criminals we’ve ever had.

          • 0 avatar
            C5 is Alive

            “Actually C5 is a sociopath.”

            Oh please. In any case, I’ve been called worse by better.

          • 0 avatar
            EGSE

            “I’ve been called worse”

            No doubt you can live up to it.

            I think everyone here now has a better understanding of what you really are.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “No doubt you can live up to it.”

            nah, he’s like every other paper tiger “tough guy.” he’s all talk, “brutally honest,” “I just tell it like it is,” “personal responsibility,” blah blah.

            that is, until he gets into trouble or gets sick. then he turns into a whiny baby who demands the world stop and help bail him out and save him.

            guys like him pretend to be hardasses about things like this until it affects them. Then they turn into pathetic little gibbering weaklings. like every Boomer douchebag who struts around saying “I ain’t afraid to die” until they’re actually faced with death.

            Like a wise (but crazy) man said in 2008, “You see, in their last moments, people show you who they really are.”

          • 0 avatar
            C5 is Alive

            “Do you believe your course of action will have less harm? If so, what evidence do you have to support that? Other than “shouty guy on Fox News says so,” that is.”

            I know it makes you feel better to tell yourself I’m just another Trumpist, but I actually don’t watch Fox News and I genuinely cannot stand our current president. While I dislike many of Biden’s policies I may still vote for him anyway in November… if there’s still an election.

            Anyway… would my course of action do less harm to the economy? Yes. Would it do less harm to individuals? Quite likely, and I’m comfortable with the odds being in my favor.

            What’s the point of anyone surviving COVID-19 if they’re then doomed to live in a squalid, economically devastated hellhole? That is what you’re setting up for our country. You, ESGE, Arthur and others may genuinely not intend for that to happen (although being such a diehard Leftist I’m sure you’re positively giddy this is all happening under Trump’s watch. Don’t bother trying to deny that) but that’s what you’re doing.

            So yes, absolutely, unequivocally, faced with two bad choices I’m going to take the one that represents the greater good for the greatest number. If lesser minds want to call me a ‘sociopath’ for that then so be it.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            I asked you what f***ing evidence you had, not for you to just assert your opinion again.

            Sod off.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            @C5: simple mathematics support the proposition that a timely complete shutdown for a period of 2 to 3 weeks, will have a far less negative impact on the economy than ‘ignoring’ the problem, carrying on as usual and having the virus continue to infect people for months.

            Again like the old oil filter commercial. Pay for the complete oil/filter change now, or pay for the engine damage later. As gear/petrol heads we should be advocating for preventive maintenance. Do you keep driving when your ‘check engine’ light is on?

            As for wanting the economy to ‘tank’. Why? I am close to retirement, the better the market does the better for my RSP.

            Meanwhile you advocate ‘rolling the dice’, while S Korea has demonstrated exactly what needs to be done to control the virus.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Opening things back up based upon the premise that 80% of symptoms are mild and the other 20% would die soon is based on some very shoddy assumptions.
            A “let ‘er rip” scenario has been modeled to show 2.2 million deaths in the USA from COVID -19. The USA health care system would be decimated by admitted COVID-19 patients.
            What happens to all of the other people requiring hospitalization?
            Child birth is statistically the most common reason for going to the hospital.
            “Regular” pneumonia’s are another. Then there is cardiovascular disease, and pulmonary disease. Add to that various forms of trauma from fractured limbs to head injury and since we are talking about the USA – gun shot wounds.

            The USA would grind to a halt with or without social distancing.

            I don’t recall reading about or being told about sky high mortality rates in the millions from the Great Depression. My dad didn’t have any tales of death, just stories of self sacrifice, hard work and creative frugality. He spoke of people pulling together and sharing.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “Actually C5 is a sociopath.”

            Oh please. In any case, I’ve been called worse by better.

            @C5 is Alive – not much of a retort there buddy.

            What is worse than a sociopath?

            Hhhmmmmm…..

            There is a clinical distinction between sociopath and Psychopath. Technically, the latter is worse.

      • 0 avatar
        thelaine

        There is a thing known as “herd immunity.” The population builds up a resistance to a pathogen to the point where it ultimately burns out. Quarantining everyone has the effect of blocking that from happening. But if we allow the most low risk groups in the population to go about their normal activities, we can theoretically be rid of this plague in a shorter time frame. It also means that life can get back to normal and we don’t have to ruin our economy in the bargain.

        The longer this goes on, the more this damages society as a whole. We cannot continue living in a state of siege. The numbers just do not justify what we are doing to ourselves. What we’re doing amounts to amputating our arm to cure an infection on our big toe.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @thelaine – “the flu” has a mortality rate of 0.1%.
          COVID-19 **IF** healthcare systems are **NOT** overwhelmed carries a death rate of 1.0% or slightly less. That death rate shoots up between 3% and 6% with an overwhelmed system.
          The point of controlling spread is to allow the health care system to cope with incoming cases therefore reducing the death rate.

          Have you every watched someone die from advanced respiratory disease or ARDS?

          England was going to adopt the “herd immunity” model and bailed on that plan once the death toll and associated costs to the economy were tallied.

          If the USA goes down the “let ‘er rip” herd immunity model and the rest of the world does not, we might just witness the most appalling biological experiment in recorded history.

          Ironically, a Godless country with a proven track record of disregard for human rights and freedoms was unwilling to allow “let ‘er rip” to occur on their soil. That shines a rather dark light on the USA if “they” are willing to let people die in the name of capitalism whereas China was not!

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            that hasn’t gotten through to him the first 3,000 times people have said it. at this point it’s just p!ssin’ into the wind.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        “I’d prefer to have a functioning economy and country while me and mine are still around.”

        Ah, so any economic downturn has to equal total, 100% non-functionality. And this guy thinks I’m irrational…LOL

    • 0 avatar
      thelaine

      Where was your compassion last year when people in the workplace were dying of the flu and people kept coming to work and life went on??????

      This happens EVERY SINGLE YEAR during flu season, you wide-eyed panicked sheep. Turn off the TV, or vow that you will shut down the economy next fall and winter as well, because, as they say, winter is coming, and with it will come cold and flu season. TENS OF THOUSANDS will die. Yes, tens of thousands. Millions could die worldwide. Please take a moment and look at historical flu deaths. Check out 2017. Did you know this was not the first year we have had simultaneous flu and corona virus seasons? Actually, we have simultaneous flu and corona virus seasons…every freakin year.

      You are thinking like a child. Fear has taken over your brain. You are incapable of rational thought. Look at the evidence. Turn off your TV.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        “Where was your compassion last year when people in the workplace were dying of the flu and people kept coming to work and life went on??????”

        were hospital ERs and ICUs overloaded beyond capacity last year with flu patients?

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @JimZ – Any logical person would believe that pointing out that fact that the Chinese government didn’t have the stomach for “let ‘er rip. Let ’em die” would be sufficient.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Uh, there was a vaccine for last year’s flu…

        Seriously, thelaine, stop trolling. It’s a bad look.

    • 0 avatar
      thelaine

      And so yes, the plant should stay open, so people can work, if they so choose. Most of them would choose to come to work. Most of them are not terrified or hysterical.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    It’s difficult to know what to make of stories like this without knowing, given the population of workers at these plants, based on probabilities, how many would be expected to die of the seasonal flu in a typical year?

    • 0 avatar
      C5 is Alive

      Given photos we’ve all seen from inside UAW factories, I would fully expect the typical assembly line worker to have a preexisting condition or two, as well.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      I work in an business with 500 people. The CDC says that 8% of the population gets the flu each year, so 40 people in my office. The average death rate from flue is about 0.15%. I don’t recall hearing about any of them dying from the flu each year.

      Maybe 1.5% of the CV patients die of it, so it’s 10x as fatal as standard flu. If 1/4 of my coworkers gets it, it’s likely 2 people in my office will die just this year.

      • 0 avatar
        Dan

        Magnifying that, Covid gives you no clue that you’re sick until you’ve been shedding virus for days and remains contagious for up to two weeks after (if) you recover. There’s no plausible way that it gets to 8%, or 25%, or even 50% of the population and then just stops there. Herd immunity will take in the range of 75% of us getting it – and the 25% that don’t will be isolated communities and shut ins, not a lucky quarter of people in offices of 500.

        It’s likely that 6 people in your office will die this year.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    More hysterical reporting that’s heavy on scare tactics and very light on facts.

    No indication if these people had preexisting health issues that contributed to the death.

    Just relax people….this isn’t a big deal. Some slight modification to your daily routine and we will be just fine.

  • avatar

    Someone who never personally died does not understand how painful and terrible experience it is.

    • 0 avatar
      thelaine

      ILO, those who have lost loved ones know a pain that is worse. Desperately clinging to one’s own life at the sacrifice of the entire society is understandable, but not excusable.

      People are terrified. I get it. Compassion, however, is where you find it. We need to ask how compassionate it is to make a conscious choice to destroy millions of lives through unemployment and poverty. I submit that it is heartless and selfish. To those who say, “you first,” I say the same right back. You first into the poverty meat grinder. I’ve been there. If you haven’t, you don’t want any part of it. Trust me.

      Believe it or not, death is not the worst thing that can happen to a person.

  • avatar
    thelaine

    C5,

    I very much appreciate your comments, along with those of a few others, even though you are trying to reason with a terrified mob who attack the messenger.

    https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2020/03/when_youre_a_carpenter_everything_looks_like_wood.html

    This virus does not justify kneecapping our economy. A more targeted approach, similar to what we do during flu season, would have been sane. We had a full-employment economy, as strong as in many decades, and we have smashed a sledgehammer into it because we panicked. This was a huge mistake.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    A major issue with C5’s and TheLaine’s beliefs are that the economic aftermath of a downturn will be neither as pronounced or as prolonged as they keep stating.

    It will instead be a blip.
    The infrastructure will remain intact.
    Pent up demand will unleash consumer spending.

    Some must be too young to remember that traditionally Western Societies largely ‘shut down’ for 4 days over Easter, and from the period of December 24th to January 2nd. With zero negative economic impact.

    In Ontario all stores were required to legally close on Sundays until the early 1990’s. Again with no negative economic impact.

    The majority of manufacturers would regularly have total plant shutdowns, generally in early August, again with no negative impact.

    To this day many societies practice a 3 week hiatus/general vacation in August, with little negative economic impact.

    Whereas prolonging the infection period and overwhelming the healthcare facilities would have a serious economic impact.

    As they say in risk management ‘it is better to mistake a rock as a bear, than to mistake a bear as a rock’.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Exactly. It’s like these guys think an economic slowdown equals 100% economic collapse. And then they accuse anyone who disagrees with them of “hysteria.” It’s laughable.

    • 0 avatar
      Daniel J

      There are several medical folks out there that are saying we need at least a 2-3 month shelter in place order beyond the middle of April. Sorry, but that sort of hit on the economy will take a while to come back from.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @Arthur Dailey – Ah, yes.. The “Lord’s Day Act”. It was against the law to work on a Sunday or a Christian religious holiday. “Back in the day”, the Roman Catholic Church in Quebec was more powerful and influential than the government. Anyone working on a “Lord’s day” was expected to donate their pay to the church. I do believe that was an expectation from other religious entities.

  • avatar
    Old_WRX

    I thought this site was about cars not. Now the comments seem (mostly) to be political knee jerk-ian foaming at the mouth.

    • 0 avatar
      ravenuer

      I agree! Let’s bring back the cars.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Well, they arent making them lol. All I can say is that the Mini EV has been delayed so I’ll be looking for some rims for my Fiesta ST which I suppose will be cheaper to buy now since Uncle Sugar is kicking some cash around which negates part of the reason for grabbing the mini anyway.

        So a thread about decent looking 15 or 16 inch rims (stock 17s are stupid on a car that small) rims in 4×108 with a 38-40 offset would be cool. They seem to not be terribly common but I’d prefer redrilling the hubs and rotors to 4×100 if I can avoid it and I’m not running adapters

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