By on March 13, 2020

1978 Mercury Zephyr Z7 in California wrecking yard, gearshift - ©2019 Murilee Martin - The Truth About Cars

You had to expect it. This QOTD, that is, not the reason for it.

As yours truly basks in the smugness of having stocked up on at least a month’s worth of food, toilet paper, and disinfectant two and a half weeks ago, thus sidestepping the panic-buying hordes picking supermarket shelves bare like buzzards on still-fresh roadkill, his self-satisfaction is nonetheless tempered with an edge of dread.

Frankly, I’m freaked out. Prepared and informed, yes, but worried all the same. For many of us, there could be plenty of days — and maybe even weeks — ahead where we’re not allowed to leave our homes. Your author’s prime minister already finds himself in just such a situation.

How would you pass that time?

Let’s be clear: many of you will have kids and family to take care of, but there’ll surely still be plenty of personal downtime when under quarantine (or self-isolation). Passing two weeks or maybe more locked inside means there’ll be plenty of time to touch up the grout in your shower or catch up on light reading.

Maybe a bender is in order.

Yes, as we prepare to distance ourselves from humanity, entertainment will be key. Many of you won’t have a project car to work on, nor will there be anything in the backyard shed or even the basement to tinker with. There might not be a garage, shed, or basement. After the events of Thursday, professional sports is out. That leaves TV and film, and maybe (very) brief forays into the more artistic side of electronic media.

So, that all said, what are the top three (a good number, I feel) car-centric or car-adjacent movies/TV shows you’ll watch — or would like to watch — to while away those long, pensive hours? If you can’t think of three, pare the list down.

You author’s personal list, as always, starts with Duel, a move I’ve seen maybe 15 times and could watch every week without getting bored. Imagine that Dennis Weaver and his six-cylinder Plymouth Valiant are me and you, and the menacing Peterbilt is the coronavirus. Next up is The French Connection — hardly a car movie, per se, but a great flick with an exciting chase that I normally watch on Christmas. This past December it didn’t happen. Third place is a toss-up. I’ll probably forgo a specific film and tune in to some 1950s, ’60s, or ’70s cop show, where sidewalls are tall, drum brakes abound, and right and wrong fall on either side of a crystal-clear demarcation line.

Comforting, predictable.

Have at it in the comments.

[Image: Murilee Martin/TTAC]

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200 Comments on “QOTD: So Now What Do You Do?...”


  • avatar
    pragmatic

    Spielberg it is Duel and Sugarland Express

  • avatar
    retrocrank

    A fridge full of beer is the antidote to many things.

  • avatar
    1998S90

    Christine and The Wraith. Who doesn’t love car-based revenge movies???

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    I’m remoting into work, so it’s business as usual.

    My trip to Sebring has been moved to November.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Yep…I’ll be working from home and had some travel postponed. But if I have time for a movie it won’t be a car movie, it’ll probably be “Field of Dreams” since I can’t watch baseball now.

  • avatar
    Sobro

    I’ll spend my time laughing at the idiots who think it’s the end of the world and that toilet paper will see them through in comfort.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Who needs toilet paper paper…thanks to all the idiots I can wipe my arse with my 401k.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        Oh, good one

      • 0 avatar
        EGSE

        Yeah, no joke. The financial hangover will be here long after the virus burns out.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          @EGSE: The financial hangover would be far, far worse if these shutdowns weren’t being mandated. There’s a reason why quarantines work–they isolate the illness. The problem with this one is that it spreads BEFORE the victim even realizes they’ve been infected. Ergo, eliminating large crowds and packed workspaces helps prevent the virus from spreading so that far fewer people will even get the virus.

          Try a little research into the Spanish Flu, that hit the US around 1916, I believe, and see how that one affected both people and the economy. In today’s world, that would have been even more severe. It looks now like too many people didn’t learn that lesson.

          • 0 avatar
            EGSE

            Vulpine, I absolutely concur. Doing our best to get ahead of this is the best course of action. To add context to my comment, no matter what the outcome is we won’t get away on the cheap. There are lots of folks that live paycheck to paycheck. Reduced hours, a layoff or medical expenses will hit them hard and fast. Those left standing will pull back on discretionary spending. Many businesses also don’t have the wherewithal to endure even modest financial stress. I don’t think it will be like 1929 but a lot of people, infected or not, are going to get hurt.

          • 0 avatar
            -Nate

            The spanish flu pandemic was in 1918, apparently they no longer teach history in school….

            This morning I headed out early to buy new house slippers and was amused to see the crowds of people streaming out the just opened doors with shopping carts over flowing with bottle water and nothing else .

            One man was managing three carts .

            I guess the anti-science fools have forgotten that you already have good, safe clean water in the tap and if you’re still paranoid you can simply BOIL IT FOR THREE MINUTES to make it safe….

            Ignorance doesn’t make you blissful, it makes you an angry paranoid hostile conspiracy theorist who’s choosing to be afraid ~ very afraid .

            These are the same folks who rail endlessly against “BIG GUB’MINT !” and then wonder why their sad & pathetic lives are so miserable and unhappy .

            Well, it’s coming up to 12:30 so I think I’ll take one of my Foster boys out to lunch at a PUBLIC RESTAURANT (gasp) where liver & onions are calling from afar .

            The L.A.U.S.D, just announced they’re closing up shop at the end of to – day .

            Be concerned and cautions, not foolish and scared .

            -Nate

    • 0 avatar
      thelaine

      Sobro: agreed. They mostly just stay home, watch cable news and and poop, I think.

  • avatar

    I will do no different than I did during the 2009/10 Swine Flu Pandemic – practice good hygiene and continue life as normal – no over-reaction like we are seeing at this point in time. Is it serious? Yes! – especially for those at risk (folks 70 and older). Do we need to shut things down and discontinue regular daily routine? No! We took no extreme measures during the Swine Flu Pandemic, we need do nothing more today.

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      I can’t get over this giant freak out – it’s like everyone is a germaphobe now.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        You sound like those dimps who say “everyone was freaking out about Y2k and that was nothing!”

        Uh, yeah, it amounted to nothing because we treated it like a big deal and MADE SURE it wasn’t a problem by getting ahead of it. This whole thing isn’t about being germophobes, it’s trying to help make sure we don’t overwhelm hospitals with serious/critical cases all at once.

        • 0 avatar

          @JimZ: Jim, would you rather we seriously impact the nation’s economy (which may be more devastating than the actual outcome of the pandemic) – OR – took rational precautions I mentioned and deal with the economic outcome of that course of action? As of 3/10 the “death rate” expected from COVID 19 is at 1% – most likely less – quite similar to the Swine Flu pandemic. One example of going over board – It’s been officially noted (can’t remember if it was WHO or the CDC) that kids only get the virus from adults – not other kids – so closing grade schools is an overreaction to my way of thinking. I get your point, but I just disagree. I appreciate your sharing your thoughts on this subject.

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            The swine flu death rate was 0.02%, stated another way, (assuming 1% is correct) COVID 19 mortality is 50 times higher.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            THX

            Get back to me when you’re an actual epidemiologist. right now I’d rather listen to them than some “smart guy” on the internet. right now all I can find from the CDC is that children don’t seem to get sick *as often* as adults, and those that have it probably got it from an adult. I don’t see anything that says they definitively haven’t transmitted it amongst themselves, nor anything that says they aren’t carrying it and transmitting it without symptoms.

            again, your mentality is “we’ll wait until it looks like a problem” which usually ends up being too late. This is already a lot bigger than SARS was. We already have half as many cases of CoV2 in MI as we had SARS cases in the entire country.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            JimZ, we’ll know more at 1pm Eastern when President Trump makes the announcement to shut down America, according to Bloomberg, which will cover it live.

          • 0 avatar
            87 Morgan

            It’s been officially noted (can’t remember if it was WHO or the CDC) that kids only get the virus from adults – not other kids – so closing grade schools is an overreaction to my way of thinking…

            Winner for the dumbest anti science comment on the internet. I beg you go to CDC.gov and find support for this insane statement….so what you are claiming is kids who get the virus from an adult are then to able to emit or spread a different form of the virus than the one they caught from the adult than that other children are magically immune to…What? It mutates?

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @THX1136: By the numbers, the actual death rate so far is around 2.5%, more than 250 times greater than the 0.1% of the typical flu. The ONLY way right now that we can limit the spread of this thing is to simply stay as far away from other people as possible, which means avoiding crowds and heavily-populated areas.

            Yes, there will be an economic effect but that effect would be far, far worse if the US were to lose 2.5% of its population–nearly 9 million people–over the course of one year to this disease.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            …”we’ll know more at 1pm Eastern when President Trump makes the announcement”

            Oh thank God. I was worried but good to know he’s on it.

            -From high level cabinet meetings:

            Trump – So is this like an STD…I mean can you get it from skanky porn stars?

            Some Doctor – Umm, no sir…that is not how this is transmitted.

            Trump -. Ok good…I umm, have a friend who was a bit worried. And just to be clear, burning pain during urination isn’t a symptom, right?

            No sir, it is not

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            Excellent post, THX. Closing schools is counterproductive. Who is going to look after the kids? In many cases, it will be grandparents. That is not going to work out well. The safest place for those children is in school and away from old people.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @thelaine: “The safest place for those children is in school and away from old people.”

            Really? Let’s assume, for the moment, that one of your earlier statements is correct and that the kids effectively can’t get the virus… but they CAN carry it. You have adults–some relatively elderly–trying to teach those kids. The adults CAN contract the virus and if one of those happens to be teaching in that school, they can easily pass that virus not only to their fellow teachers and administrators but also to the kids—no fewer than one classroom full and potentially to as many as six classrooms full if they do middle-school and high-school class rotations (don’t know if grade schools do that today or not but it really doesn’t matter.) That’s a minimum of thirty kids per roomful as well as the number of adults in the school. Thirty kids times six means one hundred and eighty kids potentially exposed to ONE infected adult, not even considering any adult-to-adult contact. One hundred and eighty kids, passing through five other classrooms raises the potential carriers to nine hundred, assuming no shared classes. Since ‘no shared classes’ is unlikely, I’ll reduce that to a conservative five hundred kids. Then we get to add the teachers of those five other classes, multiplying the numbers yet again. The potential grows very high that every kid and adult in that school could become infected within days of the initial individual’s attendance and either contract the disease or carry it to their homes and families

            Are you even beginning to see why your argument fails? Those homes have more ‘vulnerable’ adults who can then carry it to their workplaces, friends, extended family, etc. Even if, as you say, the children are safe, their families are not. And don’t forget, the disease is communicable up to two days BEFORE any symptoms are felt… greatly enhancing the chances of its spread.

            Do some research for yourself and stop believing what the politicians have been saying. Even the President has realized this issue is far, FAR worse than he was claiming just days ago. Am I saying we need to panic? No! We need to stay calm and take precautions to protect ourselves and others from the spread of this disease. Washing hands, avoiding physical contact… pretty much sensible precautions you should take to avoid any disease–including the common cold–can help protect you and your family from something that is proving to be deadlier, on a case by case basis, than any virus we’ve experienced in the last 50 years.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      Look at my response to EGSE above. The Swine flu was nothing. Try comparing this to the Spanish flu.

    • 0 avatar
      thelaine

      The economic consequences of this Coronapanic are hurting a lot of people very badly. Everyone is not at risk of dying. Concern and resources should be focused on the well-known vulnerable populations. Over-hyping and over-reacting to this virus is completely irresponsible.

      • 0 avatar
        Dan

        “Concern and resources should be focused on the well-known vulnerable populations.”

        The vulnerable populations include everyone over 60, plus anyone with weak cardio health or a weakened immune system, plus the few percent of the young and apparently healthy who will develop a severe case in spite of that. That’s upwards of a third of the country. If you expand your definition of weak cardio to include sedentary obesity it’s fully half.

        Yeah the other half of us, you and I included, will sleep it off. But business as usual will have all of us coughing all over each other all summer and when we cough on the first group a whole lot of them are going to die.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        What is with you thelaine? What constitutes a “real” emergency? Would an atomic bomb sent by China qualify? My guess is that if a bomb were on it’s way you would be the first one to tell everyone to just “duck and cover”, you’ll be just fine

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          just like anything else, if he doesn’t want it to be true, then it isn’t true. Doesn’t help that the cable news soothsayers keep whispering reassuring sweet nothings into his ears.

        • 0 avatar
          thelaine

          The economic consequences of this Coronapanic are hurting a lot of people very badly.I have a newfound respect for the much-mocked “prepper” types. They were more right than they knew. You don’t need a real catastrophe. You just need a panic. God help us when we get a real emergency. We should focus intensively on protecting the vulnerable and emphasizing that everyone else take reasonable cold and flu season precautions. Virus season happens every year, folks. Many people die. We can do more to protect the vulnerable, but crippling the economy and causing panic is a terrible response.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Talk about arrogance, experts from all over the world are advising these courses of action, but you and a couple of Washington D.C. idiots think you know better. The nerve

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @thelaine: I wonder how many of those “preppers” are going to die because they like to gather and boast about how much they’ve prepared for a nuclear Armageddon? Everybody is vulnerable, some more so than others. YOU, sir, are vulnerable, even if you don’t realize it.

            This is not a “virus season” type of disease. Until you can get that through your skull and into your brain, you are now more at risk than I, and I am supposedly one of the “vulnerable.” Not due to age, by the way, but because I have been an asthmatic since I was a child. Strangely, however, I don’t take the flu vaccines on a yearly basis because every time I have, I’ve contracted a surprisingly severe case of said flu. Yet, when I don’t, I don’t catch it. Every year of which I was enlisted in the USAF, I had to take the vaccine–and every year I had to take three or more days out on sick leave after the shot. Since then I have only taken the vaccine once and within days was bedridden for two to three days just trying to survive. Am I immune to this? Very probably not. So to avoid it, I’m staying home as much as possible and my wife, who works in a crowded office, has arranged to work from home for at least the next several weeks.

            In other words, “Better safe than sorry.”

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            The problem with “better safe than sorry” is that overreaction has very serious costs. Until you get that through your head, you will never understand the problem with your point of view. People need their jobs and their income. Crippling the economy in the interest of better safe than sorry is a very destructive policy. Everywhere this virus has appeared it has been no worse than what we get most flu seasons and attacks the same vulnerable groups, except children, who shrug this virus off. The reaction should focus on those who need help, and the rest of us should go to work, so we can make money and support our families. If we get infected, we will be fine. This is not polio. It is just a flu-like virus. Something similar happens every single year. People have lost their minds. At the center of it all, 3,200 people have died out of a population of nearly 1.4 billion. Economics matters. Jobs matter. Money matters. Responses should be weighed against costs.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ


            The problem with “better safe than sorry” is that overreaction has very serious costs. Until you get that through your head, you will never understand the problem with your point of view. People need their jobs and their income. Crippling the economy in the interest of better safe than sorry is a very destructive policy. Everywhere this virus has appeared it has been no worse than what we get most flu seasons ”

            Italy proves otherwise. They dragged their feet the same way we are. I’m sure ignoring Italy was just an “oversight” on your part and not you being a disingenuous a** as usual.

            if we’re *under*reacting and this drags on for the better part of the year, what do you think THAT will do to the economy?

            And don’t say “it won’t,” you have no basis to declare such.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @thelaine: I’m with JimZ on this. But all I’m going to say to you now is that we should just agree to disagree and see how things pan out; this thing is still just in its opening stages and is far from being contained and controlled. There won’t be any vaccine for this for at least another 9 months and possibly as long as 18 months.

            Let’s just see who survives and who doesn’t, hmmm?

          • 0 avatar
            -Nate

            About the closed public schools thing :

            Not sure about where you live nut in major metropolitan areas they’ll mostly be running wild in the streets…..

            I know I would if I were young again .

            -Nate

    • 0 avatar
      Polka King

      I’m acting normal too, but I must say, what if when I do need to buy some toilet paper and the pigs have bought all of it. They’re pigs. Do they even wipe?

  • avatar
    JimZ

    working from home, minimize going out. if I get it, I get it. I stay in, call my Dr. office, ask what I need to do or watch out for, and ride it out. Michigan went from 2 to 10 cases overnight, and given how hamfisted our leaders have been about testing and confirming cases, who knows how many there actually are.

    (cue all of the “it’s no worse than the flu because I said so” people)

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Working from home and watching either Netfix or Amazon streaming. Me TV for a while was running reruns of Highway Patrol with Broderick Crawford from the 50’s– some neat old Mercurys and Buicks.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    How would you pass that time?

    Comment on TTAC and various other favorite sites. Complain about stuff I have no control over, work on my “to do” list… The usual

  • avatar
    thelaine

    Testing and self-isolation for infected people are great practices that should be encouraged.

    Much of the rest of the reaction to this virus is insane. This weak-ass virus is much less deadly than the average flu. Most people will think they have a cold or will not even know they got infected. Other people will get a fever and a cough for a couple of days. BFD. Resources should be focused on vulnerable populations, who are always the same, for damn near any virus.

    The economic consequences of this overreaction are real. Should we shut down or cripple our economies every flu season? People have businesses and families. They need work and customers and money. This irrational mania is crushing people.

    Protect the vulnerable, get tested if you feel sick, and don’t go out if you are infected. Everyone else should go on with their lives. The average flu is much worse. Kids are damn near immune.

    This is the most insane overreaction I have ever seen in my entire life. We are going to pay a very significant economic price for our hysterical response.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      “This weak-ass virus is much less deadly than the average flu.”

      another know-it-all Internet epidemiologist/pathologist.

      • 0 avatar
        thelaine

        The evidence is public and does not require a medical degree to understand.

        In the face of strong evidence, a personal attack is all you can expect from a leftist.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          I’ll gladly read your links of “evidence”

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            Check out corona virus update. worldometers corona

            links are scrubbed.

            You won’t understand it anyway. You need rationality in place of emotion.

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          “The evidence is public and does not require a medical degree to understand.”

          Ladies and gentlemen, may I present to you the model of the Dunning-Kruger effect. thelaine is perched firmly atop Mt. Stupid.

          https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Dob0YLHU4AEqYrG.jpg

        • 0 avatar
          EGSE

          @thelaine

          You are flat wrong. The case fatality rate is orders of magnitude greater than the influenza strains we’ve experienced over the last 100 years. The facts are easy to find, but you won’t find them on Infowars.

          • 0 avatar

            That is false. If you choose to look at the numbers out of early affected countries you’ll see a more accurate picture. Here’s the latest data out of South Korea:

            189,000 people tested
            7,513 tested positive for COVID-19
            52 deaths
            Do the math. The current “crude mortality ratio” in South Korea is .69% (52 / 7,513) — about 80% lower than the 3.4% discussed commonly.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            because South Korea has their s**t together, has been aggressively testing and treating people.

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            What is Infowars?

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “What is Infowars?”

            you aren’t fooling anybody.

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            I have never heard of “infowars” Jim.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @thelaine: ”
            I have never heard of “infowars” Jim.”

            — Then look it up. “Google is your friend,” so they say.

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            You are correct THX. The mortality numbers are inflated because most people who get it are unaffected or think they have a cold or, for whatever reason, don’t get tested.

        • 0 avatar
          northeaster

          There are certainly people who shoot their mouths off unencumbered by physical reality, aren’t there?

          Hmmm, let’s see, thelaine as a source for the pathogenicity of the “weak-ass” COVID-19 virus?

          Or maybe Tony Fauci (the chief of NAIAD appointed during the early part of the AIDS epidemic and has been through Ebola, SARS, MERS and now this), who has recently suggested that SARS-CoV 2 disease might be as “minimal” as a severe influenza variant rather than 10-50 fold worse?

          https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMe2002387

      • 0 avatar
        Ol Shel

        Grizzlies kill far fewer people than flu.

        That means they’re not dangerous, and shouldn’t be avoided.

    • 0 avatar
      LeMansteve

      You can compare it to the flu, but the two are not equivalent. This is like having a SECOND flu out there, of which we are still learning new things each day.

      Far more is know about the flu than about the 4 month old Coronavirus. There is no COVID-19 shot, no specific COVID-19 treatment. There is no consensus on all the ways in which it spreads or how it survives (or hopefully doesn’t survive) warm weather.

      If we let this go unchecked – by that I mean simply relying on people to practice good hygiene and use good judgement – there is a good chance it will overwhelm our capacity to treat it.

      Considering all this, temporarily closing schools and cancelling public events is a good thing.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        nah, he read some stuff online, and he doesn’t need to actually know anything about it.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        “Considering all this, temporarily closing schools and cancelling public events is a good thing.”

        It might be necessary (I don’t know I’m not an expert on this sort of thing) but I do think “a good thing” is a glib way to put it. Millions of people are going to experience extreme economic and personal hardship over the world shutting down for two months.

        This entire thing is very bad.

      • 0 avatar
        thelaine

        Closing the schools is going to kill old people. Who will be watching the children when the parents are working? Day care is now impossible to find. If you can find it, those same kids are going to be grouped together anyway, so you accomplish nothing. Plus, children are not a high risk group.

        This is a panic reaction.

        Newsflash:

        We have a cold and flu season every year…..

      • 0 avatar
        thelaine

        This is a very reasonable argument LeManSteve. The problem is that we already know who is vulnerable to it. It is the same groups that are vulnerable to the flu, except children, who shrug this virus off. The people we should be protecting are the vulnerable populations. Crippling our economy to to try to stop the spread of a virus among people who are not going to die from it has massive costs to millions of people trying to support their families and pay their bills. During flu season, we focus on the vulnerable and take what precautions we can to protect ourselves. If we get the flu, we suffer for a short time and survive. If old or sick people get it, they often die. This is the track record of corona virus. It has damn near run its course in China. We know how deadly it is. 3,200 people out of a population of almost 1.4 billion. We need to get back to work.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      “This weak-ass virus is much less deadly than the average flu.”

      Here’s a link claiming just the opposite, but you won’t like it because it doesn’t fit your narrative

      https://www.cnbc.com/2020/03/11/top-federal-health-official-says-coronavirus-outbreak-is-going-to-get-worse-in-the-us.html

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        he’ll just say they’re wrong because they’re “leftists.”

        then he’ll say they “can’t think for themselves,” utterly unaware of the irony.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          But, but, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases is part of the United States Department of Health and Human Services
          which means Dr. Anthony Fauci, director works for Trump

          Oh the irony

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            they’re just trying to undermine him.

            /s

          • 0 avatar
            EGSE

            Yeah, our Prez who “loves the poorly educated”.

            Con men love them because they’re easy to dupe.

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            Actually, con men love the highly educated, because they are arrogant.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            “Actually, con men love the highly educated, because they are arrogant.”

            Then you must have a PHD

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            I’m sure the economic impacts will be real, and I’m sure at the end of it about 10 percent of us will be expected to fund some sort of “plan” that takes some of our money and gives it to others to spend. I know, my politics=stupid, but my money sure spends!

    • 0 avatar
      PeriSoft

      “This weak-ass virus is much less deadly than the average flu.”

      I haven’t seen any data showing this to be the case. Even accounting for drastic under-testing of mild cases, COVID-19 is still somewhere around 5x to 10x as deadly as the regular flu.

      The problem is that you get what you have in Italy, where a really rapid spread means that there isn’t enough equipment / space to treat the most vulnerable population *all at once*. The same number of people are going to get sick; the idea is to use social distancing to spread that out over three months instead of one month, cutting the peak usage of ventilators, hospital staff, etc, by 60 or 70%. That in *itself* can save a lot of lives – and, incidentally, quite a bit of money.

      The good news economically is that if we do this right, having people sit at home for a couple of months will cause a short-term hit but not a long-term drop in economic output, because we’re gonna go out afterwords and spend money we weren’t spending in the interim. It’s important to support small businesses that will get cash-flow issues, but beyond that we *should* be able to weather this with the right policy.

      Pretending it ain’t no thang, though, is not going to work. The point isn’t that this thing is *super deadly*. The point is that with no pre-existing immunity in the population and no known antivirals or vaccines, the spread will be VERY RAPID and overwhelm the system *even so*. Remember that even the flu season hits over 6 months, not 6 weeks, and that the hospital system *already has a load from flu patients*. This is not a “this virus is a sci-fi killer” problem; this is a “we don’t have excess capacity to handle 10x as many patients as usual” problem, and THAT’S what’s going to kill people (even people who don’t have COVID-19!).

      And turning a disease into some kind of f**king left-vs-right purity test has got to be one of the stupidest, most short-sighted, most “why the hell do I have to be a human right now” moves I can imagine. Can we please stop?!

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        “And turning a disease into some kind of f**king left-vs-right purity test has got to be one of the stupidest, most short-sighted, most “why the hell do I have to be a human right now” moves I can imagine. Can we please stop?!”

        I’d like to think that all of this will finally put “stupid” to rest once and for all, but I know it won’t :(

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        this. that’s the whole point of “Flattening the curve.” try to slow the spread as much as possible so ERs and ICUs don’t get overwhelmed. ‘cos it’s not like they’re usually empty as it is. That’s why cancelling/suspending sporting events and closing other venues of mass gatherings is prudent right now. last thing you want is someone who has it being in tight quarters with 10-20,000 other people.

        I’m not particularly afraid of it. I don’t *want* to get it (who likes being sick?) but I have very few risk factors for a severe case. What I really don’t want to do is contract it and unwittingly pass it on to a couple of older relatives of mine who are basically walking risk factors (e.g. trifecta of lung, heart, and diabetic issues.)

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        “but beyond that we *should* be able to weather this with the right policy.”

        I’m not sure what policy levers you think can be pulled, but I do not share your optimism at all. I’m expecting full black flag doom. Q1 and Q2 data is going to be globally catastrophic. Beyond basic necessities no one is going to engage in “make up spending” during times of such future economic uncertainty and it won’t be long before it becomes a complete tailspin.

        • 0 avatar
          PeriSoft

          ajla, much depends on the perception of the response. If the gap isn’t too long and people come out of it with their jobs intact (and there’s a place where policy can help, in ensuring that employers can stay solvent) I don’t think it’s unreasonable to expect pent-up demand. I know my family and I are probably going to be itching to get out and do stuff.

          I might be too optimistic, and yeah, the damage is going to be pretty severe even in the best case. But I’m still hopeful that it can be, say, 80% in the form of displacement rather than destruction.

        • 0 avatar
          Dan

          “I’m expecting full black flag doom. Q1 and Q2 data is going to be globally catastrophic. Beyond basic necessities no one is going to engage in “make up spending” during times of such future economic uncertainty and it won’t be long before it becomes a complete tailspin.”

          All of that liquidity that we spent the past 11 years printing up to fix the last one is still out there. We’re in the process of printing even more of it.

          I don’t know how many cents a dollar will be worth at the end of the day but I have every expectation that we’ll have a lot of them.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      All of the competent authorities to make an estimate on the subject believe that COVID-19 is tens of times more deadly than the average flu, but you do you I guess.

      No, on second thought, don’t do you. I’m trying to keep my 80-year-old mother and 76-year-old father alive.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      @thelaine: The problem with your argument is in the numbers. While total number of deaths to the common flu virus may be high, that flu virus has been in the world for decades, with slight variations, and the death RATIO is only 0.1% of all infected. When comparing this coronavirus, you will discover the fatality rate of KNOWN sufferers is much closer to 3.5%, hundreds of times higher than the flu.

      This is not overreaction but rather preventative medicine–reducing individual risk of infection by isolating not only the infected but also those who might become infected by those who, as yet, have not shown any symptoms.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        Americans don’t believe in “preventative” anything. We just cover our eyes and ears and kick the can down the road. Then when the SHTF we whine and act like “how could anyone have seen this coming” and then expect the government to bail them out.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          “Americans don’t believe in “preventative” anything.”

          There were 65 cases in the US on March 1 and by March 13 nearly any event or large gathering through mid-April is closed, cancelled, or postponed. More testing availability would have been great but I disagree with the idea that the nation as a whole whistled past the graveyard on this.

          • 0 avatar
            Dan

            “There were 65 cases in the US on March 1 and by March 13 nearly any event or large gathering through mid-April is closed, cancelled, or postponed.”

            That’s giving us way, way too much credit on both counts.

            Warning wise there were rounds to zero confirmed cases because rounds to zero people had been tested. We knew damn well that there were at least hundreds and likely thousands of cases by then. Europe had already counted that many with only slightly better testing.

            Response wise, another two weeks later – and two thousand confirmed cases here and conservatively ten times that many unconfirmed – and yeah they’ve cancelled some major events and European flights but most public life in the DC suburbs – of a zillion people and three major airports – is still business as usual. The schools were open today. The subway is running. Casinos and concerts and bar crawls. Pretty well all of it.

            Delaying the surge by a couple more weeks would have given time for a lot more beds.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @Dan: And now the DC suburbs in Maryland are having all schools closed for a minimum of two weeks, including colleges, and gatherings of more than 250 people are prohibited… as if one person couldn’t infect all 250 in one go by shaking hands, brushing against them or any one of a number of different methods–all unknowing to both themself and their victims.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “and yeah they’ve cancelled some major events”

            I can’t speak for DC, but public life in my part of Florida is stopped or stopping by Saturday. Schools, sporting events, office buildings, cruises, and theme parks are all gone till April or longer. This strong of a response has never happened before even if there was a Cat 5 hurricane bearing down on us.

            What kind thing would you consider proper? Short of instituting a military or police enforced quarantine I don’t know what else could be done.

          • 0 avatar
            Dan

            “What kind thing would you consider proper? Short of instituting a military or police enforced quarantine I don’t know what else could be done.”

            Everything that we’re finally doing now about two weeks earlier – three would have been better – would be a bare minimum start.

            You’re right of course that a Wuhan level quarantine and lockdown won’t politically fly now let alone a couple weeks ago. But after the smoke clears on the millionish dead we’re going to see this year it’ll sure fly next time. (Nothing would make me happier than to be called a gullible alarmist now and events to prove the accusation true.)

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          “Americans don’t believe in preventative anything…”

          Not true. We have invaded multiple countries and kicked off several “preventative” wars over the past 2 decades.

  • avatar
    Maymar

    I’m on paternity leave until the fall, so I was already under self-imposed social isolation. I’ve been using nap time to clear out a fairly large YouTube Watch Later list (mostly car-related, I’ll go on a binge of adding anything related to some model I’m fascinated by at the time), and have a decent stockpile of old car documentaries.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    Working from home – the governor shut the schools down until April 6th.

    Once in awhile I’ll be watching Cleetus Mcfarland videos on youtube; wondering if I should pay to watch the Freedom 500, where 20-something Crown Vics will be racing each other on a small decrepit track.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      “…wondering if I should pay to watch the Freedom 500, where 20-something Crown Vics will be racing each other on a small decrepit track.”

      Umm, what is to wonder? If it comes down to buying this or toilet paper then I guess I’ll be hosing my butt off after I take a dump.

      • 0 avatar

        WHO numbers for China as of 3/6: 80711 confirmed, 3045 deaths. Do the math – .0377.

        here’s the link: https://www.who.int/docs/default-source/coronaviruse/situation-reports/20200306-sitrep-46-covid-19.pdf?sfvrsn=96b04adf_2

        • 0 avatar
          EGSE

          “WHO numbers for China as of 3/6: 80711 confirmed, 3045 deaths. Do the math – .0377.”

          Check your math. The case fatality rate equals 3.77%. You are off by two orders of magnitude. You forgot to multiply by 100 after doing the division. It would be 30.45 deaths if your assertion was correct.

          • 0 avatar
            Ol Shel

            He didn’t put % after .0377, so not technically incorrect.

            Agreed. those numbers indicate a 3.7% death rate.

            Yikes.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “Check your math. The case fatality rate equals 3.77%. You are off by two orders of magnitude. You forgot to multiply by 100 after doing the division. ”

            it would be funny if it wasn’t so sad.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            You have to look at the CFR, or Case Fatality Rate for each age group.

            From the Center For Infectious Disease at University of Minnesota:

            “… Of the confirmed cases, 1,023 patients—all in critical condition—died from the virus, which results in a CFR of 2.3%. The CFR jumped considerably among older patients, to 14.8% in patients 80 and older, and 8.0% in patients ages 70 to 79. Among the critically ill, the CFR was 49.0%.”

            http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspective/2020/02/study-72000-covid-19-patients-finds-23-death-rate

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            For background on why age groups are affected differently, check out this article:

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thymus

          • 0 avatar
            EGSE

            @MCS – “You have to look at the CFR, or Case Fatality Rate for each age group.”

            This is a good catch and is why we should be cautious in using the 1918 “Spanish Flu” epidemic as a predictor for covid-19 mortality.

            The 1918 epidemic most strongly affected young people with relatively more responsive immune systems. It tended to trigger a “cytokine storm” which caused a positive feedback in the immune response, ultimately resulting in fulminant attack to lung tissue. The onset was often extremely rapid….accounts exist of healthy adolescents getting on the NY subway and being dead at the end of the line. This causality wasn’t understood by the physicians of the day.

            Older patients with less responsive immune systems were statistically more likely to ride out the disease with more classic symptoms with less virulence, though they were still at significant risk as with all types of flu.

            Chinese physicians have gathered evidence that diabetes and heart disease (over-represented in older people) significantly elevates risk for covid-19 patients. It would be reasonable to assume that less-robust immune systems play into this as well, though I have no hard data to cite. So far the evidence suggests younger patients fare relatively well with covid-19.

            I’m not in the medical field but cytokine response is a subject of interest to me.

            Further reading: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cytokine_release_syndrome

  • avatar
    Hummer

    You would think for the over reaction we would be seeing bodies carted out into the streets and mass graves to quickly dispose of the diseased bodies. Instead the majority of deaths are from one nursing home in Washington.

    Unless you’re old and/or sickly, you should be more worried about a heart attack. What a nothing burger this turned out to be, no where close to the level of the swine flu.

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      Give it a few weeks and what you describe is plausible.

      At the best guess mortality rates so far, if any significant fraction of the population is affected, it will be tens or hundreds of thousands of deaths.

      The precautions are to prevent or delay such an occurrence, and are reasonable in my opinion given the stakes. If I have to work from home a few days to help keep older and more vulnerable people alive, that is a sacrifice I’m willing to make.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        The sacrifices a lot of people are going to be making over the next 2-24 months is likely much greater than “work from home for a few days”.

        It might all be completely needed, but this is a leg amputation. I don’t think people should downplay the “cure” anymore than they should downplay the disease.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      “You would think for the over reaction we would be seeing bodies carted out into the streets and mass graves to quickly dispose of the diseased bodies. Instead the majority of deaths are from one nursing home in Washington.”

      What is it with Americans who are so against *prevention*? Whether or not it’s an “over-reaction” remains to be seen, but the measures being taken are being done to try to *prevent* this from becoming a huge problem.

      Why do you think we have to wait until there are bodies in the streets and mass graves before we react? What the hell is wrong with you?

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        Because, there are people who believe that real life is a superhero movie and at the last minute some Captain America will come and save the day

        I blame Hollywood ;-)

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Prevention and hysteria do not need to go hand in hand, in fact the hysteria likely makes the situation worse.

        Being prepared for the worst does not require the entire country to go out and buy 4 packs of toilet paper, water, and bread. It’s borderline insanity.

        What the hell is wrong with you?

        Why is this virus any worse than SARS and Swine flu? No unusual steps were taken in either of those cases, just use common sense. This is being treated like a modern Black Plague when for the vast majority of patients it’s an extended cold.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          Frankly with plane tickets to Las Vegas only $66 I think I might be making a detour there over the coming weeks, I’m not going to stop my life over the WuFlu.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            On your way to your FREE trip to Italy?

            Have fun :)

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Why stop my life over this? The chance of me dying from this is extremely low. But everything in life carries a risk, mitigating risks are smart, but stopping life is not smart. I’m fortunate enough to not have to deal with the horrible healthcare system prevalent in Western Europe and I’m safer everyday because of it. God Bless the people of Italy, particularly the elderly.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            “Why stop my life over this?”

            Because you have a family to think of. Stop being silly, would you like to snort some coke or slam some heroin? I mean not everyone who does gets addicted, so why not? Your kids will be fine without you, right?

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            I’m not telling anyone to shoot up coronavirus, I’m pointing out that not going to work, avoiding the grocery store, pulling children out of school is overkill. Flying to Las Vegas for instance, since I mentioned it, is not likely to put me at any significant risk of contracting the virus, add in the factor that the likelihood of a healthy, reasonably fit 39 year old suffering anything other than light cold symptoms is low, let alone death – hysterical responses on my part are highly unnecessary.

            Not to mention we’re now getting into warmer weather with near 80 degree days, the virus will likely peak very soon in the US.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            @Hummer has once again ‘lost the thread’. The COVID-19 outbreak has exposed the American healthcare system as being woefully inadequate.

            Estimates are that approximately twice as many people who who have been infected/exposed in the USA have not sought out medical care, due to the cost.

            COVID-19 testing kit supplies and infectious disease prevention facilities are insufficient because they are not ‘profit centres’ during normal times.

            Other nations are completing COVID-19 testing at up to 10x ( for instance Canada) the rate of the USA because of their universal healthcare systems.

            Currently I am undergoing medical treatments that if I were living in the USA would have either a) bankrupted me, or b) left me unable to leave my current employer due to a ‘pre-existing’ condition. In Canada all that it has cost me is the price of hospital parking.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            “ Currently I am undergoing medical treatments that if I were living in the USA would have either a) bankrupted me, or b) left me unable to leave my current employer due to a ‘pre-existing’ condition. In Canada all that it has cost me is the price of hospital parking.”

            Trust me I see how Canadian healthcare works, you sit and wait your turn, sometimes for days. Here in America I have a $500 deductible for the entire year, which is paid with tax free money. I pay $500 once for the entire year and I can go to any specialist, have any surgery, any medical treatment that exists. Typically a specialist takes a week to get into for a non emergency, the last time I was in an ER it took 20 minutes to get a room and medical attention for who I was with.

            Our system is far from perfect, thanks Obamacare, but it’s a hell of a lot better than what I see other 1st world countries suffering from. I see in Italy elderly patients are being denied care, that would never fly in America.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “Trust me I see how Canadian healthcare works,”

            Translation: “I’ve never set foot in Canada, but someone on TV/the internet told me stuff so I’m an expert now.”

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          I’m not buying tons of bread, water, and TP, so there’s nothing wrong with me.

          “Why is this virus any worse than SARS and Swine flu?”

          Michael Osterholm- a real, actual infectious disease expert- has said one of the most notable differences with nCoV is when this virus infects a patient, the sheer number of copies it makes of itself (which the infected person then coughs/sneezes/exhales) is way more than past viruses. that’s why when it pops up in a region it goes from a handful of cases to “holy s**t we’re in trouble” virtually overnight. the first SARS virus didn’t do this.

          THAT is why people are worried. this thing is spreading a lot faster.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            @Hummer once again you are wrong. And in some instance unfortunately ‘dead wrong’.

            In Canada I can go to any hospital, anytime for treatment. No charge.

            I have my choice of GP’s (Family Doctors) who provide primary care and then refer me to the specialist of my choice. No charge.

            If required I can call an ambulance anytime. The ambulance is crewed by trained paramedics. The cost varies from no charge to a maximum of $45 in my province.

            I can switch jobs anytime and even with pre existing conditions retain my universal healthcare.

            Infant mortality rates in the USA have increased beyond those of many 1st world nations, and life expectancy in the US has fallen below that of many 1st world nations. A few decades ago, the USA had better rate in both of these than any other nation. But since then those nations have developed universal healthcare systems and the USA has not.

            Then there are the hundreds of thousands of instances over the past few decades of personal bankruptcies in the USA due to medical costs.

            And Americans who did not seek healthcare or avoided routine check-ups because they had no coverage.

            Yet the governments in the USA still spend more per capita on health care than most nations that have universal health coverage. Just where does that money go, and who is profiting from it?

            Obama tried to fix the American problem but Congress tied his plan up into a program that does not satisfy anyone. You can thank Mitch McConnell for that.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “@Hummer once again you are wrong. And in some instance unfortunately ‘dead wrong’.

            In Canada I can go to any hospital, anytime for treatment. No charge.”

            notice how Hummer shut his dumb a$$ up after you posted?

        • 0 avatar
          jack4x

          SARS had severe symptoms onset more quickly, so it was easier to isolate the sick immediately, which greatly limited spread and kept most of the cases in China.

          H1N1 (swine) flu had a death rate of 0.02%, whereas this COVID strain is anything from 50-100 times higher.

          I don’t think anyone is saying hoarding TP and hand sanitizer is a good idea. But prudent measures like limiting large gatherings of people could help prevent what we are seeing in Italy right now.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      “this turned out to be”

      You say that as though we know anything. We’re still in the early stages of spread, and places that have gone through more of the stages have had mortality rates between 1% and 5%, with the mortality concentrated among old people. That’s a lot more deadly than the flu. It could mean a million dead Americans. The exceptionally fast spread also means there is the potential to completely overwhelm our health care systems. We’re just at the beginning.

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    I work from home when I am not travelling anyway. I’ll be studying for a really annoying vendor certification exam that I have been procrastinating for a year. Joy.

    I have a work trip to HI next week – so far, so good. I’m not worried about it, the client isn’t worried about it, but who knows if the airline will still be flying in a week. Getting stuck in HI for a while would be OK though… ;-)

  • avatar
    loner

    My teen son just picked up a high mileage first vehicle that is in good shape, but there are about 25 things the car needs to really be ready to go. A couple weeks of vacation, er um, self-isolation would be a great opportunity to bust out the timing belt and most of the other projects.

    But on topic with the movie question, I’d recommend Hobbes and Shaw. I dislike the rest of the films in the F&F franchise, but found H&S to be a lot of fun.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Vehicle relates movies? How about Two Lane Blacktop, American Graffiti, and The Great Race. Yeah the Great Race is a stretch but as a kid the first time I watched that movie and saw Natalie Wood in her ‘undergarments’ it marked a major change in my life’s priorities.

    Otherwise, I would recommend watching ‘classic’ Top Gear episodes. Never get tired of watching Clarkson, May and Hammond.

  • avatar
    mikey

    I braved Costco, and the grocery store, yesterday . ..With a good supply of beer on hand ..I can tough it out.
    The Impala is in much need of a detail job . I’m going take the cover of the Mustang and fire it up.. I see too much salt left on the roads to risk driving it . I live alone so I may tackle spring cleaning a bit early.

  • avatar
    thelaine

    Again, nothing but a personal attack. It is page one of the playbook.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      I’m willing to read your links that support your “evidence”… I get nothing

      I supply a link supporting an opposing viewpoint by a government agency… You won’t read it

      Talk about a “page out of the playbook”

      Your Troll Rating = 1/10… Do better

  • avatar
    TR4

    Top picture, I’m guessing either Pinto or Mustang II.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    … Play a lot of MMO games.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    I wasn’t very afraid of my office, because many of us have separate offices with doors and it was easy to go in and out without getting too close for social distancing. But, today, they locked us out. And the local schools are closed. So now I get to find out how well I can work from home on a sustained basis with 3- and 5-year-olds around.

    Mostly, I’m concerned about my mom. She’s 80, and lives a short distance from the nursing home where the Washington outbreak first came into view. While she’s much healthier than the average 80-year-old, I still feel all too aware that mortality rates among people that age are in the double digits. We’ve been keeping her away from the kids, because the kids had been in school until this week and kids are often asymptomatic carriers.

  • avatar
    Russycle

    “Third place is a toss-up. I’ll probably forgo a specific film and tune in to some 1950s, ’60s, or ’70s cop show, where sidewalls are tall, drum brakes abound, and right and wrong fall on either side of a crystal-clear demarcation line.”

    My prescription would be The Rockford Files, lots of 70’s Detroit iron in all its power sliding glory. The line between right and wrong can get a bit murky, but that makes it more interesting.

  • avatar
    EGSE

    I’ll get some time with the ’02 pick-up, fixing the rusted stuff. Already have the 2″ square tube and a 4′ x 10′ sheet of 14 gauge diamond tread for the bed. All the welding stuff is here. Now that’s it’s getting warm the bolts get burned off and the box pulled with the loader. The cab rust and a respray can wait for calmer days.

    There’s plenty of canned food, TP and fuel for the genny (which won’t be needed). We get big snows every few years and with a 700′ farm lane it’s status quo. The wireless data cap isn’t great but I’ll manage. Not much changes for me; it’s the friends that live in close proximity to others that are at far greater risk.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    Thankfully I reside in a city that has a good public health system that has responded to crisis in the past.
    I’ll have a relaxing weekend catching up on some TCM in the DVR and maybe Hoovies garage on YouTube.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    The weather is warming up and I have a fresh bottle of C25 welding gas and a stack of new steel and deck boards (new flatbed in progress). [Note to self: Find a place to weld *Indoors* someday – because wind.]

    Rewatched “Contagion” last night with the spouse, halfway through “Outbreak”.

    Car shows:
    – Watched some early episodes of “Starsky and Hutch” the other week (Hutch’s car is way cooler than Starsky’s by the way) – gotta love that vintage brake dive.
    – The kids are getting sent home from college, so we might do some ‘best of’ Top Gear.
    – And I’m tremendously excited about the upcoming Mary Barra biopic – or was it the seven-part series on “Great Thoughts from Jim Hackett” (I get those two mixed up).

    Best of luck to everyone.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    Well they just killed my travel and told us to make sure our VPN access is up and take our laptops.

    As for movies? Got Outbreak, Contagion, and The Andromeda Strain in the queue!

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    @Art Vandelay: What? And not Steven King’s ‘The Stand’? Remember how THAT book starts out (300 pages worth of introduction just to get to the main story.)

  • avatar
    Zoomers_StandingOnGenius_Shoulders

    Congratulations on being one of mindless greedy hoarders who fueled the hysteria and took away from someone else. You must be so proud right now.

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    I didn’t self-quarantine for the H1N1 virus in 2009, and I’m not doing it now. This is a press-driven event, not a crisis, and there’s no need other than the usual precautions for flu season.

    This “crisis” is an irration overreaction for political purposes, just like the impeachment farce, the Mueller investigation farce, the Russian election tampering farce, and the on-going global warming farce. All you’re seeing is the final destruction of a totally corrupt and irrational press.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      stupid people always think they’re smart enough to “have it all figured out.”

    • 0 avatar
      thelaine

      If you are otherwise healthy and you get Corona virus you will get sick for a few days and then you will be fine. The hysterical reaction to this virus is insane.

    • 0 avatar
      thelaine

      Correct, Lorenzo

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      So @Lorenzo is more than willing to serve the role of ‘typhoid Mary’ and possibly pass the virus on to hundreds if not thousands of other people. Who will then pass it on exponentially.

      And of course some of the people that they pass it on to will be old, ill or otherwise have their immunity compromised.

      All because he believes that he is so healthy that he does not have to worry about getting ‘too’ sick from it, himself.

      Wonderful logic there.

  • avatar
    JMII

    Going fishing… which is what I would do pretty much every weekend. Weather down here in S FL is beautiful (low 80s) so I am going to get out and enjoy it.

    Major bummer about the St Pete GP getting canceled as I was really looking forward to the weekend with my wife and friends over there. No F1 race either so I guess its Netflix and chill.

    The economy crunch of this pandemic is going to be brutal. Netflix, Amazon and Door Dash seem to be the only kinds of operations seeing increased business. The ripple effect of shutting everything down is epic. My brother who works in the cruise industry has already laid off half his staff and he assumes he’ll be jobless soon too. I lost my job in the cruise industry due to 9/11 but the effects of this virus are way more wide spread – touching pretty much every industry and job sector in some way. Most people can’t work from home and they are going to be hurting big time sadly.

    Stay safe folks.

  • avatar
    thelaine

    Fewer than 50 people in the US have died from Corona virus. The US population is 330 million. 3,200 people in China, population 3.4 billion, have died. Every year the flu kills between 12,000 and 60,000 people in the US. Do we panic, buy toilet paper by the ton, close the schools, shut down every public event, crash the stock market and retard the economy every flu season? This is a weak virus which does not even affect healthy children. Vulnerable people need to be protected, just like they do for any virus. They should be getting the attention and care. Healthy people who get Corona virus may get flu-like symptoms for a couple days and then recover. It is not a severe health threat. People have lost their minds and should be ashamed of themselves.

    • 0 avatar
      SSJeep

      China’s population is 1.3 billion. The lack of proper research invalidates most of your argument.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      @thelaine:
      • “This is a weak virus which does not even affect healthy children”
      — Not every child is healthy, just like not every adult is healthy.

      • “Vulnerable people need to be protected, just like they do for any virus.”
      — Would you consider one of the more recent US victims–a 55-year-old man with no chronic illnesses–“vulnerable”?

      • “Healthy people who get Corona virus may get flu-like symptoms for a couple days and then recover.”
      — SOME do. Others, just as healthy, carry and suffer from the virus for more than 27 days. It attacks each individual differently and while you may THINK you are perfectly healthy, it can still kill you without proper treatment. How do I know? Because we’ve already seen how it affects different people. Sure, the elderly may be demonstrating the higher fatality rates but the simple fact is that even they survive most flu attacks and this cornoavirus is killing more of them IN PROPORTION to infections than the flu we’re used to.

      This IS a severe health threat, even if you don’t want to believe it. Right now you may or may not have it, depending on where you work or live or who you may have come into contact with. These businesses, entertainment venues, sports and others are effectively entering quarantine to the best of their ability to protect themselves, as well as you, from a virus that has the potential to be as deadly as the Spanish Flu back in 1918 (as somebody so sarcastically corrected me yesterday.) We’ve already seen how deadly it CAN be but unlike back then, communications allows us to at least attempt to get ahead of it and reduce the risk of catching it. Without that communications and without some of the more common medicines we already have on hand, we would now be seeing far more infections in this country and far more severely ill from this virus than we are currently. Actively preventing and avoiding large crowds is slowing the rate of infection and may possibly keep you from contracting it and may even save your life.

      Of course, if you don’t care whether you live or die, that’s totally up to you. I do care and I appreciate what these groups are doing to fight the spread of the disease.

      By the way, considering the way President Trump sounded on the microphone yesterday, I’m not so sure he’s managed to dodge it. And he is in one of those life-critical age groups for the disease.

      • 0 avatar
        thelaine

        The flu kills between 12,000 and 60,000 Americans every year. This virus is much less deadly. It could be even less deadly if we focused on the populations that needed protection and encouraged everyone else to take reasonable precautions to avoid contracting or spreading the virus. This is true every single cold and flu season. It would be a great idea to remove the stigma of healthy people wearing masks at work and in public. If everyone did this, along with the other well-known precautions, it would retard the spread of the virus without crippling they economy and badly hurting millions of people financially.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          @thelaine: “This virus is much less deadly.”

          — Bull. This virus has barely started in this country. You have no idea just how deadly this virus could be in this country. Certainly your use of numbers trying to prove your point only proves that YOU don’t understand them. Right now, in the US alone, the death rate of this virus among CONFIRMED Covid19 infections exceeds 2.88% while the “common flu” has a confirmed death rate of 0.1%. Think about that just for a moment.

          Meanwhile, taking “reasonable precautions” is something most people don’t do, which is why so many catch the flu every year, despite vaccines. Based on that history and the fact that so many are like you and believe this is a non-event, I expect to see this outbreak go totally out of control, despite the efforts of more sensible people and organizations to limit the spread.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        “I am officially declaring a national emergency—two very big words,”

        Well, thank the lord our President lets us know when words are very big.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          Hey, but you know he’s not responsible for the “big words”… he has a staff, they do stuff that he doesn’t know about… like putting big words in his speeches and dismantling important government agencies that were designed to deal with pandemics

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            Donald J. Trump, 2013: “Leadership: Whatever happens, you’re responsible. If it doesn’t happen, you’re responsible.”

            President Trump, 2020: “I don’t take responsibility at all.”

  • avatar
    thelaine

    Google worldometers corona. Posts with the link are scrubbed.

  • avatar
    SSJeep

    Ill spend most of my time on this site to hear what the experts known as “TTACs best and brightest” have to say about COVID-19. IT makes for great entertainment.

    • 0 avatar
      Zoomers_StandingOnGenius_Shoulders

      Oh dont worry, every one of the BESTEST and BRIGHTESTEST Y’ALL(!) will suddenly become a doctor who spent time in infectious diseases and knows all about it and most importantly, more than you do…NUBILE. So many experts all educated in so many different fields here…its a miracle of sorts. Witness this thread. LMFAO.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I’ll think of you all while I’m working 75% of my normal contract hours the next 3 weeks in an empty building.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      I’m in the same boat. I have maybe a week’s worth of stuff if I stretch it I can bill for outside of a classified environment. After than don’t know. As a contractor though I’ve set a bit aside…if it isn’t crap like this it’s a government shutdown or something. Good Luck.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        The most ridiculous instructions were given to the non-administrative employees.

        “You are ‘on call’ – Monday through Friday you need to be able to get to work within 1/2 hour of being called. But otherwise you’re not allowed to come in.”

  • avatar
    thelaine

    Numbers are a little old, but the pattern is the same:

    A: So far, there are no reports of deaths among young people in the U.S. The U.S. Surgeon General reports the average age of people who have died from coronavirus in the U.S. is 80. Additionally, he says those who are most impacted have chronic, serious health problems such as heart disease, diabetes, and lung disease.

    Q: Who has died so far?

    A. These were compiled using CDC reports plus news and local health department reports:

    31 Washington State elderly. That includes 27 in King County, (22 at the same elderly nursing facility in Kirkland), three in Snohomish county, and one in Grant County, a patient in their 80s.
    Four California elderly: A woman in assisted living in her 90s, a hospitalized woman Santa Clara in her 60s, an “elderly man” in assisted living, and a 71-year-old man with underlying health conditions who’d been on a Grand Princess cruise ship.
    Two Florida residents in their 70s who had traveled overseas.
    One New Jersey diabetic man, 69, who suffered two cardiac arrests.
    One South Dakota man aged 60-69, with “underlying medical conditions”
    One Georgia man, 67, with “underlying medical conditions”
    Q: How many people have recovered?

    A: News reports say that in China alone, out of 80,000 diagnosed, nearly 60,000 have already recovered. However, the true number of recovered is likely far higher since most of those who get the virus have mild or no symptoms, and so are not diagnosed at all.

    Q: Why have there been so many coronavirus deaths in Italy?

    A: Italy has reported 827 coronavirus deaths. Experts say the high number is partly because Italy has more residents in the vulnerable age category. Italy has the oldest population in Europe and more elderly per capita than the U.S. Most of the Italian deaths are in patients in their 80s and 90s. In addition, Italy has a great number of direct China contacts. Italy was the first to join China’s “silk road” economic partnership project. The coronavirus is believed to have originated in China. Italy’s 827 deaths are out of a population of 60 million people. Even though one death is too many, it is still a small relative number.

  • avatar
    thelaine

    Heather MacDonald has an excellent analysis entitled, “Compared to What”

    Link gets scrubbed, but it is easy to find.

    Shutting down the economy over a virus that is less deadly than the average seasonal flu is hysteria. The numbers are available at Coronavirus Update, worldometers.

    The numbers are the numbers. They are small compared to the yearly flu numbers. The deaths are overwhelmingly the same people who die from the flu. In other words, this is like a mild flu season.

    This happens every single year.

    The question remains: should we shut down the economy every cold and flu season?

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      @thelaine: Heather McDonald is hardly a neutral observer on the matter. While I applaud her belief that politicians don’t need religion to express their point (she appears to be a decided agnostic) her political views are otherwise just a extreme as the President’s himself and the rest of his political cabal in Congress. A simple review of her writings across the board demonstrates this.

      • 0 avatar
        thelaine

        Heather MacDonald’s arguments can be analyzed independently of your opinion of her politics. You have not even attempted to address what she wrote.

        Every day, adults weigh the costs of additional safety and make judgments that are going to cost lives because it is too expensive to do otherwise. This happens the roads, for example. The roads are killers. We spend a certain amount on keeping them safe, and no more. More is not realistic. We could shut them down, or just shut them down in the winter or when it rains or at night and save hundreds of thousands of lives. But we don’t. It wouldn’t make sense economically. We need to go to work, for fk’s sake. We have families to feed.

        Do you think economic decisions don’t play a role in the medical treatment of the elderly? In countries with government run medicine, these decisions are explicit. If you are of a certain age, you are not going to get expensive life-extending care. They are going to “make you comfortable.” They only have a certain amount of money to spend. Everyone only has a certain amount of money to spend.

        Should we consider the economic consequences of the extraordinary measures we are taking to prevent the spread of a virus which is not killing people that an ordinary flu also does not kill just because it is called “corona” and people are freaking out? Heather MacDonald says yes. I happen to agree with her.

        This virus is not killing healthy children. It is not killing healthy people in general. It is killing the same vulnerable groups as the flu, except in much smaller numbers. Fewer than 100 Americans have died. Last year, I believe about 36,000 Americans died of the flu.

        We are turning our economy inside out and really hurting working people very badly due to fear and panic. We should weigh the economic consequences of our actions before we engage in knee-jerk fear-based protective measures.

        I can design a car you can drive and be safe in almost any accident. It won’t fit on the road and you won’t be able to afford it. That is why we don’t build it. Instead, we have cars that you can afford that you CAN get killed in. Rational adults have to make decisions which balance safety and economics. We are out of balance on the corona virus.

      • 0 avatar
        thelaine

        Hopefully, once this this all over, the people who are spreading fear and panic and who have caused so much economic destruction will prove capable of reflection. I would hope they are also capable of shame. I am not holding my breath on either count. They will probably just move on to the next “outrage! or “crisis!”

        God help us if/when we ever really do get an actual grave crisis. It is going to be really nasty. You win, preppers. You have convinced me. People are what they are. You cannot expect more.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    “Social Distancing” doesn’t mean hiding under the bed nor emptying out the shelves at the store .

    Here’s my and a friends solution along with of course, hand washing , making sure anything wet (towels, dish rags etc.) are carefully hung out to air dry between use etc. the normal responses of educated people .

    Plus this :

    Just so Tom (and others) ;

    You’re supposed to use ‘social distancing’, what better way to get away then by riding or driving ? .

    Don’t be afraid, that’s un American .

    Go out and ENJOY LIFE do not simply endure it .

    -Nate
    LIVE in the world as it is, WORK to make the world as it should be

    From: Tom

    Subject: Anti-Corona Depression Therapy

    I’m also offering an alternative to sitting around the house and feeling isolated. Use your imagination. For example, I’m still planning the Golden 88 Two Wheel Tour on August 8th. It’s gonna be so good that it deserves italics!

    In the mean time, imagine visiting a brick castle with a dark history, the only water powered machine shop in the United States, a display of turn-of the-century Tesla and Edison electrical mining equipment, a pre-Columbian (that means “before Columbus”) Mi Wuk settlement, the town of Volcano with a good Civil War cannon story, three (3!) cattle herd overnight lodgings, and riding mile after mile of mostly paved back roads that wander through forests, across rivers and streams, and produce views of the Sierra that are the stuff of dreams.

    And that’s all before lunch.

    After lunch, we’ll see Kirkwood, a couple of lakes, and then bomb straight down from Carson Pass for about 70 miles to the Castle, a drop of about 8,500 in 90 minutes. Imagine that. We won’t stay at any of the places for very long, but the ride will be a sampler plate to introduce you and yours to places that you will want to visit again when you have more time. This area is awesome with tons of history and relics.

    I’m “sheltering-in-place” for at least the next week or two, so I’m thinking of all the places and roads that you might like to see. If you know this area and have suggestions, feel free to suggest them soon.

    And in the mean time, use your imagination. Life is good. As Calvin said to Hobbs in the last panel of the second best cartoon strip in history, “It’s a magical world, Hobbs, ol’ buddy. Let’s go exploring.”

    I miss Hobbs so much.

    Rubber side down, old buddy,
    Tom Deal

    The V.J.L.A. annual Death Valley trip is soon, followed by the Bottom Buster Motor Tour in April….

    -Nate

  • avatar
    Polka King

    So what’s up with this toilet paper thing anyway? Whose idea was that?

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    Car movies to watch – when I’m not reading book: Maximum Overdrive, Christine, and the ultimate silly fest FatF 1-8. Mad Max: Fury Road would be in there too.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    So ;

    Demarkis and I were out running errands to – day (his school is closed too) and I made the mistake of letting him choose lunch, McDonalds, after that I went by the .99 Cents store to pick up two boxes of corn bread mix some jalapeno pop corn and carrots, the store was close to bare shelves apart from the chips aisle and the produce section .

    Dayshon ws busily re stocking so I asked him if he knew which aisle had the panic ? .

    He gave me an odd look and said ” what?” .

    ‘Well, I saw on the T.V. news that people were buying panic so I figured I’d better get me some too….’

    He smiled, shook his head and said “oh man you’re too late ~ I sold the last three cans two hours ago” .

    The there was the woman who was wearing a paper mask that didn’t cover her nose because it made it hard to breathe easily…..

    -Nate

  • avatar
    -Nate

    Sunday evening .

    I’m not so sure the folks here who refuse to accept reality are stupid nor dumb .

    Frightened and scared witless yes, obviously so .

    Remember, the noraml steps of dealing with a serious problem begin with denial .

    Try to show some compassion, even to those who don’t return it .

    -Nate

  • avatar
    Zoomers_StandingOnGenius_Shoulders

    Best and brightest. Take a gander ^. Its like herding a group of low IQ people into a room with the promise of candy and then making them think about stuff real hard. The resulting stupidity and hilarity is epic.

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