By on December 11, 2019

best all-season tires

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Not all of us need to install a different set of rubber the instant Old Man Winter pokes his head around the corner. While parts of the continent grumble into their coffee about that day’s forecasted high (*raises hand*), wide swaths of the population can run the same tires year-round, particularly if it’s the family daily.

Especially if it’s the family daily, in fact. Your author argues at length, much to the annoyance of his family, that a car owner should emphatically not cheap out on tires. They’re the only things touching the road, after all. Ponying up a few stray bills for an off-brand whose rubber compound has the flex of an oak tree is a terrible idea. And don’t get me started on the propensity of certain people to buy second-hand tires full of frozen water and weeds.

Here are some good all-season tire suggestions, presented in alphabetical order, sourced from the crew at TireBuyer.com.

(Editor’s note: As noted above, this post is meant to both help you be an informed shopper for automotive products but also to pay for our ‘90s sedan shopping habits operating expenses. Some of you don’t find these posts fun, but they help pay for Junkyard Finds, Rare Rides, Piston Slaps, and whatever else. Thanks for reading.)


1. BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport

bfgoodrich advantage t/a sport

Advantage T/A Sport tires, featuring H- or V- speed ratings, are what BFGoodrich calls Grand Touring All-Season tires. They’re marketed at the drivers of sedans, minivans, and small crossovers looking for all-season traction in dry, wet and light snow conditions. BFG promises some “fun” with this tire, but your author believes that word is best reserved for their high performance line.

The tire features an all-season tread compound molded into a symmetrical design, allowing easy cross rotation to resist irregular wear. The tire’s continuous center rib creates constant contact with the road. Their 3D Active Sipe Technology provides an increased number of biting edges for improved wet and light snow traction.

Pros: Great brand, reports of long tread life

Cons: Only one size greater than an 18-inch diameter

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2. Continental TrueContact Tour

continental truecontact tour

According to the company, this tire is designed to provide year-round traction, even in light snow (we would put the emphasis on “light” for this and all tires on this list when it comes to the fluffy white stuff).

The TrueContact Tour features a tread compound containing temperature-activated functional polymers, a snazzy way of saying they’ve baked in components that will aid tread life and fuel efficiency. This compound is molded into a symmetric tread design that provides for the ability to rotate tires (you do rotate your car’s tires, right?) and help maximize tread life. The tread pattern is also said to be optimized in a bid to reduce noise. Those heavily siped tread blocks should provide the additional biting edges necessary to enhance traction in rough weather.

Pros: Plenty of common sizes for the family car segment

Cons: Massive ECOPLUS badges brands you a nerd

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3. General Altimax RT43

general altimax rt43

The RT in this tire’s name doesn’t stand for “retweet”, no matter what social media might try to tell you. Here, it refers to Road Touring, an activity for which this tire is uniquely designed. Altimax is General’s flagship line, so they’ve thrown the proverbial kitchen sink at this hoop in an effort to grab some of the everyday all-season market share.

According to the company, these tires feature a Twin Cushion Silica Tread Compound that places a high-density all-season top compound for year-round traction and long wear above a low-density foundation compound that absorbs road vibrations to promote a comfortable ride. Circumferential grooves and General’s anti-slip sipe design technology increases the number of biting edges to enhance traction on slippery roads.

Pros: Enormous selection of sizes, positive reviews from a healthy sample size

Cons: Not exactly the sexiest tire on sale

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4. Michelin Energy Saver A/S

michelin energy saver a/s

The tire you see here is one of Michelin’s entrants into the green arena, with fuel economy being at the top of this tire’s mission list. Without too much details, the company is touting its EnergySaver construction and a “special type” of tread rubber as features that keep this tire cooler, thereby increasing fuel efficiency and technically reducing CO2 emissions.

Its continuous tread pattern (read: traditional three-rib design) allows for a good footprint and a shape that maximizes road contact. This latter attribute should be a plus for grip and acceleration, activities which benefit from greater amounts of rubber being pressed into the macadam.

Pros: Excellent real-world reviews, frequent rebates

Cons: Michelins are expensive

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5. Pirelli PZero Nero All Season

pirelli pzero nero all season

Pirelli knows a thing or two about making things that go around. While most of the world associates the brand with high performance rubber thanks to their involvement in Formula 1, they also do a more than passable job of manufacturing all-season tires. In a fantastic blitz of marketing, they’ve foisted the mighty P-Zero name upon it for good measure.

All of the sizes are 18-inch diameter or greater, save for a single Mercedes spec 17-incher. It should surprise no one that most of the suggested applications for this Pirelli are expensive luxury machines, such as Audi and Jag and the aforementioned Merc. But, hey — if you can convince your better half to agree to a set of these for the Camry, more power to ya.

Pros: Good looking tires sized for big-wheeled cars

Cons: Warranty stretches only 45,000 miles

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6. Toyo Versado Noir

toyo versado noir

Sounding for all the world like an after-dinner drink or fancy perfume, the Versado Noir is a touring all-season tire designed on the comfort end of the spectrum. Rigid outside tread blocks give a quieter ride, while those wide and straight grooves improve water drainage and reduce the chance of hydroplaning. There is a higher sipe density on the inside tread, another feature that helps when the weather turns foul.

The placement of those sipes is far from random. Without a clear shot to the edge of the tire, road noise is funneled away, meaning these tires will allow drivers to hear their passenger carping about the music selection. Whether this is a good thing or not is up to you.

Pros: Big 75k-mile warranty (on H-rated hoops)

At Cons: V- and W-rated examples have a shorter warranty

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[Images by the manufacturer; Lead image: Volodymyr Plysiuk/Shutterstock.com]

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52 Comments on “Year-Round Rollers: Best All-Season Tires...”


  • avatar
    CKNSLS Sierra SLT

    Just put a set on my wife’s 2017 Hyundai Santa Fe XL of the Altimax 43. Purchase decision based on many, many positive reviews. We were caught cross-town during a storm that dumped 9″ inches of snow. I locked the Santa Fe in to AwD and the RT43s did an excellent job. Much better than the OEM tires.

    • 0 avatar
      Jerome10

      Had these on my Corolla and they’re really excellent, especially for the price.

      Ran short of the treadlife warranty but wear was perfect, very good traction right to the end, tire shop made it painless.

      Solid in rain and snow, I think decent noise. Maybe a tad stiff on the ride.

      Would have bought another set had General had a rebate….instead Continental did and the TrueContact Tours will be installed next week.

  • avatar
    gtem

    I’ve owned three of the six tires listed:

    General Altimax RT43: Have a set on my wife’s Camry for 40k+ miles now. Not quite as smooth and as quiet as some top tier touring tires, especially as they age. BUT: they have impeccable wet pavement traction, and are quite good (for an all season) in the snow. They used to be cheaper to buy, IMO prices have gone up as they have gained a reputation for offering top tier performance for a mid-lower end price. It’s my brother’s go-to for customer cars that come in needing tires.

    Michelin Energy Saver A/S- about a year’s worth of driving with a fairly worn/mixed set of these on my Town&Country before replacing them with the Continental True Contact Tours. Like all fuel economy-focused tires, I can’t say I care for them. Fairly quiet and I guess they helped my 4700lb van squeak out a bit of extra fuel economy? Marginal in the wet, compounded by their advanced stage of wear I’m sure.

    Continental True Contact Tour – limited experience so far. They were a mid-priced tire for my van at $140 a piece, actually Discount Tire screwed up with their online listing (that they then honored) so I got them for $130/each. I only had them on for a month or so this fall before they got taken off for some snow tire shod steelies. But I was generally impressed. Low noise, very good wet traction. Mileage rated out to 90k(!), we’ll see. I was looking to match the RT43 wet traction with a slightly pricier tire in hopes of it being smoother/quieter especially as the miles wore on.

  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    I put RT43s on an ex’s E350 because her house has a long gravel driveway that eats tires and they were good and cheap. I liked driving on them enough that I then put a set on the TSX. Previously we’d had good luck with Bridgestone RE9X0 Pole Positions, but the car accumulates miles so slowly now that the last ones aged out.

    For my primary car I’ve been a Conti Extreme Contact DWS and DWS06 fan, but I now live in a city with no curves and I’ve only seen 20K miles per set of tires with a tread-wear rating of 540 or 560. I might be ready for RT43s for that car too.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      I loved DWS06s on my prior cars but I’m slowing down in my old age. I think I have Goodyear Eagle LS-2s on my TLX now. I don’t mind them. According to my phone my car does about 67dB on my local highways. They aren’t the grippiest or most feelsome tires but for commuting they are fine and they give enough feedback under load. I will save the race rubber for my midlife crisis sports car.

      • 0 avatar
        SPPPP

        I would say the DWS06 is far from race rubber. It’s a nice quality tire that allows moderate performance driving. The treadwear warranty is something like 70k miles (of course, only a few people even get close to that).

  • avatar
    R Henry

    I have been a Michelin loyalist for a long time. I have been DEEPLY disappointed with the treadlife performance of the Premier LTX 245/50/20s all-seasons installed on my 2011 CX-9.

    These are warranted to 60,000 miles. When my first set was at the wear bars at 31,000 miles, Costco comped a treadwear credit, and installed another set. The second set just hit wear bars at 29k. DO NOT PURCHASE MICHELIN PREMIER LTX TIRES!!!

    • 0 avatar
      jtk

      I have Premiers (not LTX) on my Mazda 3. They are more than halfway gone at just over 20k. Would not purchase again.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I know years back the Merc GL used to chew through tires in under 10K despite the fact they were some weird size and 400/apiece. I asked why, I was told in part because of the weight. This may be true of your CX-9.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        A lot of higher end German cars also run very aggressive alignments (per factory spec) in interests of stability, at a cost of tire wear. Throw in the immense weight of a GL, and there you go.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          This is also true of high-end Lexuses. Don’t expect more than about 25k miles out of a set of tires on a LS 460 or LS 500, regardless of brand.

          I replaced the tires on my LS when I bought it with Continental DWS06. I had added 12k miles by the time I sold it, and the Contis were about half done.

      • 0 avatar
        R Henry

        There is no doubt my CX-9 is a whale. That said, the OEM Bridestones ran 45k miles.

      • 0 avatar

        My Outback and xc70 both ate tires reliably at 35-40k miles. Several different brands and types. I have often wondered if the AWD figures into it.

    • 0 avatar
      volvo

      Our 2007 V6 Accord came with Michelin MXM* tires. With each generation of these tires price has gone up while wear and ride has declined. Not sure why but maybe LRR and green materials has resulted in these changes.
      Now use and recommend Bridgestone or Contis. Happy with them so far.

      • 0 avatar
        R Henry

        To counterbalance my experience with the Premier LTX, on my CX-9: The Michelin Pilot A/S 3 tires on my Mazda6 have been excellent–67,000 miles, 5/32 inch tread remaining.

    • 0 avatar
      Jerome10

      I have been reading/told the same thing on the Premier LTX.

      I think the Premier A/S was also in that boat.

      Otherwise it is hard to go wrong with Michelins. Price is usually their downfall.

    • 0 avatar
      SPPPP

      The treadwear warranty is really just a coupon. It’s designed to get you to buy the same brand again in 3 years. From my experience, if you drive where you have to start, stop, and turn, you will never get close to the warranty.

      TL,DR: Par for the course.

      • 0 avatar
        R Henry

        In my case, Costco was unable to provide a replacement Michelin tire other than another set of Premier LTXs, which I rejected. As such, they gave me a cash payout of $504.00 (after much bickering) when I brought the prematurely worn out tires back (after having new Conti’s installed elsewhere). Overall, it was a major hassle, but in the end, Costco did stand by the warranty. I wish it wasn’t such a pain in the rear, and waste of time.

  • avatar
    volvo

    Continental True Contact Tour on V6 Accord. IMO much better than the Michelins they replaced

    Not on the list but Bridgestone Turanza Quietrack on Toyota Avalon. Very quiet with good wet handling so far. Demand for this tire seems to be outstripping production and some wait may be needed depending on size.

    With the V6 Accord a V rated tire is spec’d by Honda so most tire dealers will not install H rated (cheaper and more tire choice) which is a pity since that is plenty of tire for the car.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    The Michelin Energy Saver A/S is not the Michelin to get. I’ve had two sets of them, one on my C-Max and one on my Bolt, and they are hard and yet gripless, consistent with their focus on rolling resistance.

    The Michelin Primacy A/S is much better.

    Personally, though, I’m partial to slightly grippier “high performance” all-seasons. I think they are really the best year-round compromise in the tire market for people in non-snowy places who care at all about driving. I’ve had very good experiences with both Michelin Pilot Sport A/S-3 and Continental ExtremeContact DWS06. I’m soon going to upgrade the cheap Wal-Mart tires that came with my Legend to A/S-3s (as soon as I can find two more OEM 16″ wheels in good shape), and I really can’t wait.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      I think you are a little jaded. I’ve driven many miles on the Energy Saver A/S and think they are the best in the segment and actually punch above their segment. But you have to keep in mind that they are All Season tires, not performance or even touring tires. However I’ve driven several tires that were touring or performance tires that were not as good as the Energy Saver. That said when I buy an A/S car tire it is currently the Pilot Sport A/S 3+, if of course it is available in the right size.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Maybe I’m spoiled because I’ve only had one set of low-end tires in recent memory. But I find the Energy Savers worse than any other Michelin I’ve ever driven. Usually if you give up grip, you get a cushy ride in return. The Energy Saver has neither, and I also find it slick in the wet. The only good thing I have to say about them is that they seem to stay in round well.

        My other cars while I’ve had the Energy Savers had Continental DWS-06; Michelin Premier LTX; Michelin A/S-3; and Cooper Discoverer SRX. All, even the Coopers, I find to be head and shoulders above the Energy Savers.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          They’re definitely mediocre in the grip department. My Town&Country lights them up all too easily with the slightest bit of moisture on the ground. Every fuel-efficiency focused tire I’ve experienced has been like this. I will gladly take a 1mpg hit in order to get good wet traction.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          The C-Max Energi I bought used came with Coopers called a touring tire on the sidewall on it and I would have loved to have had the Energy Savers, it was near impossible to get the car moving in the wet and even mild braking in the rain would activate the ABS. They were replaced with the Pilot Sport A/S 3+ as soon as Costco got them in.

    • 0 avatar
      SPPPP

      I agree, there are at least 5 Michelin tires I would get before the Energy Saver A/S. How about the Cross Climate, the Premier, the Primacy A/S, the Primacy MXV4 (oldie but goodie), or the Pilot Sport A/S 3+? All seem better to me.

      Likewise, with the Continental, there are at least 2 tires I would buy before the TrueContact: the PureContact LS, and the ExtremeContact DWS06.

      Likewise, with Pirelli, there is at least 1 tires I would buy before the P Zero Nero All Season, which is the P7 Cinturato All Season Plus.

      It’s almost as if the promoted models here are the slow sellers that someone has trouble moving.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    My A3 had Continentals as OE. Never again – they were noisy as hell and lousy in the winter. Switched to Goodyear Eagle Sports – I’m much happier.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      What kind of continentals though? The current TrueContact Tour is a new model.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        I look at Continental the same way I look at Bridgestone. They can make excellent tires for various applications, but they will also make marginal tires to win an OEM contract. The only manufacturer that generally made very good tires(at least assuming that you prioritize even wear and quiet over grip or steering feel) in every application was Michelin, and they’ve kicked the habit.

    • 0 avatar
      SPPPP

      Haha, I just replaced Eagle Sports with Continental DWS06 and I am happier. (But those Eagle Sports were on the car when I bought it, and were rather worn.) YMMV!

  • avatar
    Dan

    I had an interesting experience with Altimax HPs about 10 years ago. They had absolutely rave reviews at the time so I bought a set from Tire Rack, had the corner Merchant’s Tire put them on and do an alignment besides, and got the car back with a pull so bad you couldn’t take your hands off the wheel. Went back to complain and they said the alignment was fine. Assumed that the oil change monkeys there couldn’t use an alignment machine so went to a different shop and got the alignment checked there too – also said it was fine. Pulling my hair out at this point, I called Tire Rack and was told about tire conicity and how to rotate tires to isolate the defective one. They sent me a new tire the next day and a Fedex sticker to send the bad tire back, I go back to a shop for the 4th time, get the bad tire off and the new tire on, and it still pulls although less badly than before – at least one of the other three tires was bad too. Complained to Tire Rack again and they sent me four return stickers and Michelins, which were perfect, but for those counting at home that was five shop visits, two trips to Fedex, and nine tire mounting fees. To save like 80 bucks.

    The lessons there were:

    1) Tire Rack makes things right.

    2) Mail order tires aren’t worth the headache even in the presence of 1)

    3) Don’t buy General tires even if they’re free.

    In terms of prescription and not proscription, Michelins are the gold standard and I’ve never had a bad set of Continentals either.

    • 0 avatar
      volvo

      In my small corner of Cali Tire Rack has the largest selection and no charge for shipping from their Nevada location. However local installers that take Tire Rack shipments charge about $30/tire to mount and balance. That does not include stems/weights/TPS/disposal fee. Any savings disappear. If there was a tire I could only get from Tire Rack I would use them but for mainstream brands it is less expensive to go to local shop. Over the life of the tire Costco is probably the least expensive but brands/types are very limited there.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      The best alignment/balancing shop in my area, judging by reviews and my own personal experience, will charge you the same fee whether you buy tires from them or bring them in from elsewhere. I think they just order tires from Tire Rack.

      So my last several sets of tires have been from Tire Rack, shipped to that shop. The car always drives absolutely perfectly after the shop visit, and I’ve been lucky enough that I haven’t had a bad tire yet. The tires involved have all been either Michelins or Contis; your mileage may vary with lower-cost OEMs. (Though they successfully balanced a Cooper that felt out of round on my Highlander when I swapped Highlander SE alloys for the OEM plastic “Chromtec” wheels, keeping the very new tires.)

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Yes Tirerack has a wholesale program and pretty much any place who will accept shipments participates in that program. A friend of mine who has a speciality shop is a participant. It is interesting in that while he gets a significant discount shipping is not free, however he can pickup at a local warehouse for free.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      YMMV of course, but I’ve bought/driven on 5 sets of General tires in the last 6 years (two sets of Altimax RT43s for my departed Civic and the wife’s Camry, 1 set of Grabber HTS that came on my 4runner, 1 set of Grabber AT2s that I bought for the 4Runner, 1 set of General Altimax Arctic for the 4Runner), my brother’s put dozens of sets of RT43s and Grabber HTS, never a defect.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    Surprised to not see a Yokohama tire here. They’re the only really good, noteworthy tire experience I’ve had. I’ve had terrible luck with Dunlops. Conti DWS 06 have been good but not great and the Michelins I have now have been good as well.

  • avatar

    Tires make the biggest difference for any car. I put a set of 225/50 Conti DWS 06 on my base jetta, over a set of Bridgestone Ecotopia tires. The Stones were a mileage – long wear tire, and for that they gave up grip and quiet. When I popped the Contis on, the car went from noisy and skittish to almost plush and very grippy-the chassis settings became the limiting factor, but the car went up 15k in perceived feel. I’ve always done Mich A/S 3 or DWS 06 on my cars. For my truck, the Continental LX series is good.

    Always buy the best tires you can afford, and if you can afford it, buy the best.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      I agree that tires can make or break a car and in most cases I do buy the best. However for my vehicles that only rack up 3-5,000 miles per year I will buy a second tier tire or if I can find a good deal on take offs.

      • 0 avatar
        jh26036

        I think the idea of buying the best tires possible is a noble thought, but in reality, you have to look at the application, how it is used, how often is used, and if buying the best is actually worth it. Are the alternatives worth the compromise?

        In my case, I have an old Toyota Tacoma to strictly use as a compost dump/home depot runs. This truck maybe accumulates 2-3k miles a year on the high end. These places are all within 3 miles from my home. I am not going to spend $1,500 on like high end Goodyear Duratracs if a set of regular Hankooks or Kumhos will do just fine. Buy the tire that fits best for your needs.

        To sum it up, don’t buy Chinese tires.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          I appreciate the difference between high end, middle of the road, and low end tires. I likewise place the cut-off at the fly-by-night Chinese brands. If you’re in a real tight spot, at the very least Douglas (low end Goodyear) or Arizonian (low end Cooper), or some of the cheaper South Korean (Hankook solus, Nexen), Thai (Maxxis), or oddball Japanese (Ohtsu).

          I bought a set of $40 Maxxis MA-202s for my asphalt oval Neon, the rest of the field is on Douglas A/S and Starfires, whatever walamrt has in stock at the time in 185/70R14 (class rule). We’ll see how they stand up to the abuse!

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            I have the Douglas A/S on the back of my Legend (Mastercraft in front). They’re sort of fun because they have the grip of bowling balls and it’s easy to get the 3500 lb nose-heavy FWD sedan to oversteer in the wet, but I can’t imagine racing on them. I have to say they’ve worn well, though. I’ve put 16k on the Legend since I bought it and I’ve only lost a couple 32nds.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            It’s a problem to find ANYTHING remotely sporty in that tall narrow old school econobox size. Not even Sumitumo HTR 200s or anything like this. You’re left scrolling through the walmart tire finder fodder UTQG ratings trying to best guess and pick something with a low treadwear rating (presumably softer) with a decent traction/temp rating.

  • avatar

    Tires make the biggest difference for any car. I put a set of 225/50 Conti DWS 06 on my base jetta, over a set of Bridgestone Ecotopia tires. The Stones were a mileage – long wear tire, and for that they gave up grip and quiet. Even my family non-enthusiasts asked me why the Jetta always felt “tippy”. When I popped the Contis on, the car went from noisy and skittish to almost plush and very grippy-the chassis settings became the limiting factor, but the car went up 15k in perceived feel. I’ve always done Mich A/S 3 or DWS 06 on my cars. For my truck, the Continental LX series is good. The Jetta with big DWS is the perfect “slow car fast’ experience.

    Always buy the best tires you can afford, and if you can afford it, buy the best.

  • avatar
    Avnut

    I have had a good experience with the Altimax RT43 having them on an ’07 Rabbit, ’07 Focus and ’14 Transit Connect. I will buy them again. The positive experiences posted by others are spot on for me.

  • avatar
    nrd515

    I have the P-zero Neros on my Challenger(275 20″), and I like them in general. Much better wet traction than the OE tires on my last car, and the Falken replacements. Launching on them is a joke though, they light up almost instantly with any kind of attempt at a hard launch. Seems the best 0-60 times are to put the transmission (8 Speed) into 2nd, and let it do it’s thing. First gear is a tire spinning, and then smoking mess. There is a place where the pavement is slick and even though my present car has about 110 HP more than my last car, it doesn’t do anything like the tail out near slides the old cars did in the same place. A drive over it in my friend’s car with the OE Goodyears it came with prove the tires are the difference.

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    We have the Altimax on our Rogue and they are a pretty decent tire and do well until it gets deep. Then that is what the Blizzaks on the truck are for.

    We have the BFG Comp-2 AS on the sedan. They are the best all season tire I have ever owned*. They grip better in the summer than the Goodyear summer tires that came on the car and are good on snow and OK when it gets icy.

    *We had a model of BFG all seasons on the truck before the Blizzaks and they were the worst all season tire I have ever owned so I was hesitant to try the brand again.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    1. I’ve never been happy with “energy saver” tires, maybe because I do like to corner and be aggressive when the road is wide open and traffic non-existent.

    2. I’ve had excellent experiences with tires advertising that they have some of the latest “high silica compounds”. Perform better in snow and wet conditions in my experience. Got a set of all-terrains with that compound for the old Highlander and in snow I would have sworn I had snow tires on it.

    The Continentals on my Buick have been adequate (first set I’ve ever had) though some forum members gripe about them to the point where they’re swapping them out after just a few thousand miles.

    Seriously looking at BFGoodrich®: g-Force™ Comp-2™ A/S for a replacement tire. I also love the aggressive look of a directional tire.

  • avatar

    I used to be a bit of a tire nerd. But budget and other pursuits mean I often go for a value buy now.

    I have had good luck with General tires. All terrains were great on my SUV’s.
    Only one set of Michelin’s so far (LTX), overall great tire but started checking on sidewall at 4-5 years old which is annoying given how much tread was left.
    Of the cheap tires I have had good luck with Sumitomo Optimo tires. Also for all-terrairns fairly good luck with Pep boys house brand. I had a set of cheap firestones on my Volvo that were great winter and wet, so I bought another set (with a revised design) and they were awful in the rain. Right now I have Mastercraft all seasons on my 300 and Pep Boys all terrains on the Durango. Can’t complain much about either other then the Mastercrafts have lost a lot of their grip in the wet as they have aged.

  • avatar
    newenthusiast

    I’m a little late to the party here. Sorry.

    The Continentals listed here are what I have on my Q5. The OEM tires are the CrossContact LX Sport. The TrueContact Tour tires are less expensive, lighter, have a higher UTQG rating, a slightly better tread depth, have the ECO+ technology, and are way higher rated than the CrossContact LX on Tirerack, both by the pro review and by consumers.

    So I switched.

    Its a quieter, smoother ride. And since I switched in February, Fuelly tells me that I’m getting about a 2 mpg bump in efficiency per tank (mixed driving, no change in commute or weekly patterns).

    They are not the best A/S tires I’ve put on an Audi, though. The Nitto NT421Q I had on my Q7 were so far ahead of the Pirellis and Bridgestones and even the Michelins for that size.

    But, I also said this the last time there was a question about tires, and it still holds true: If the Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3+ tires that I have on the BMW were available in the size I’d need for the Audi, I’d use those. Even though I don’t need the performance aspects of that tire, they really are that good.

  • avatar
    JimC2

    The tread patterns on the Pirelli PZero and the Toyo Versado look positively fun in the snow (or frightening, if you’re a normal person). Dunno either of these has the M+S rating (mud and snow), not that the requirements for that are particularly stringent, nor much of a guarantee of decent traction in either mud or snow.

    I’m not surprised to read decent opinions from the B&B about those RT43s in the snow; the tread pattern on those looks, well, pretty decent.

    Too bad there wasn’t a Goodyear offering in the mix. Not a big deal, but still would be nice to have one more brand.

  • avatar
    Daniel J

    Had a pair of BFGoodrich T/A Sports on my Grand prix and really liked them.
    We have a pair of Bridgestone Ecopia 422 on our CX-5 and they are really good. I’ve got some Falkens on my 2018 Mazda6 and while comfortable riding tires, they don’t have a whole lot of dry grip.

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