By on December 6, 2019

gm

Automakers jump through hoops to tease upcoming models or put eyes on just-released ones. General Motors, it appears, has chosen an altogether new avenue for its marketing efforts.

Yes, that image you see above is real. The Chevrolet Suburban will now join the likes of Christina Applegate*, Curtis “50 Cent” Jackson, and other celebrities we can’t think to name in receiving a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. At least the star doesn’t mention the model’s upcoming rear suspension swap.

*TTAC means no disrespect to Ms. Applegate, who remains a national treasure.

The first vehicle to adorn the sidewalk along Hollywood Boulevard, the Chevrolet Suburban’s parents apparently felt it was eligible for the accolade after appearing in thousands of films and TV shows since its 1935 debut. The Hollywood Chamber of Commerce unveiled the Award of Excellence star on Thursday.

If you guessed that the next-generation Suburban’s reveal date is drawing near, you’re bang on. The big unveiling is just days away, and GM felt this effort would help highlight the model’s extremely long production history.

“For six decades the Chevrolet Suburban has been Hollywood’s longest-working actor,” said Rana Ghadban, president and CEO of the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce, in a statement. “Appearing in classic feature films and on must-see television shows, the Suburban is a well-established industry mainstay. With the Chevrolet Tahoe also making an impact in movies and on television, it’s impressive to have both vehicles now join an illustrious group of actors and characters that are forever known as Hollywood legends.”

One wonders what Ghadban said in private about this latest star.

Still, it’s true that the Suburban commands on-screen attention in the same manner that it commands on-road respect. Audiences love body-on-frame construction and solid rear axles; just ask anyone.

Often seen performing security duty and decked out in “official black” in 99 percent of its movie roles, most on-screen Suburbans end up riddled with bullet holes from AK-47s and HK MP5s, usually while missing a front door (and with hood in flames) after an RPG hit. Chevy Suburban convoys are just itching for an alleyway ambush. TTAC’s own Matthew Guy knows this, donning appropriate attire while testing the 2018 Suburban RST:

2018 Chevrolet Suburban RST

According to GM, “Suburban has starred in more than 1,750 films and television series. It has appeared in at least one television series every year since 1956, and at least one film every year since 1960. Suburban has also appeared in more than 30 award-nominated films.”

Such film credits include the 1982 bomb Timerider: The Adventure of Lyle Swann, which caused a New York Times reviewer to walk out after 55 minutes. Other more notable appearances took place after that.

This exercise in publicity, of course, aims to draw attention to the imminent reveal of the next-generation Suburban, which, like its full-size GM siblings, keeps its traditional body-on-frame architecture while moving to an independent rear suspension for greater ride quality. Stay tuned for the main attraction.

[Images: General Motors, Matthew Guy/TTAC]

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78 Comments on “Freaky Friday: Can You Tell There’s a New Chevrolet Suburban on the Way?...”


  • avatar
    Hummer

    I can tell it’s going to be a pile of crap based off of losing the solid rear axle, over 80 years of history thrown into the toilet. The Wife is currently looking at a new suburban of the current generation so at least we will have one of the final generation. We were going to trade in her GMT800 Suburban but seeing as they will cease making a vehicle worthy of the nameplate it makes more sense to keep the real suburban.

    This will be the 2018 Commodore of Suburbans.

    Barras on a rampage and will destroy every last shred of quality for their products. I guess to her selling less Suburbans is the goal, and there is no easier way than this.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Get a grip.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        How? they are destroying one of the best setups in American vehicle history. Historically speaking IRS on BOF vehicles is the kiss of death. And for very good reason.

        Unless you are in this market for this type of vehicle you shouldn’t have any say in how the product is sold. The journalists that have promoted this travesty were never in consideration of even buying one of these. The consumers that demand these vehicles have discovered the inherit weakness of IRS and the superiority of a solid rear axle in every situation.

        • 0 avatar
          R Henry

          ” The consumers that demand these vehicles have discovered the inherit weakness of IRS and the superiority of a solid rear axle in every situation.”

          I am not familiar with such consumer sentiment. What inherent weakness of IRS? Where can I read about this?

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Go watch an expedition tow, it will make you cringe, the rear wheel splayed out riding on the inner edge. Then check the setup, multiple rubber pieces and ball joints all that cannot hold up to the stresses of towing or being used as the truck the frame suggests it is. Now take a look at the differential and compare it to the Suburbans differential, they are not capable of holding up to the same duty cycle as the solid axle.

            Riding on the edges of the tires creates a very dangerous situation for the people towing as well as other people on the road. The tires should be fully engaged with the asphalt and that is not the case.

            These weaknesses play out at a consistent rate, these kinds of repairs and failures are unprecedented for Expeditions being used as trucks.

            More moving parts is the worst possible change for a towing vehicle, you don’t see tractor trailers going to independent suspension setups. The huge loss of articulation destroys any chance it had of going off-road, the IRS setups used today are horribly restrictive.

            Nothing is gained by switching to IRS except appealing to armchair enthusiast and journalists, neither which had any intention of purchasing these products.

          • 0 avatar
            R Henry

            If Suburbans are used to tow trailers weighing 5000 lbs or more, you may have a point. That said, the Suburbans used in my SoCal suburbia carry lots of sports equipment, lots of kids, and maybe tow a jetski or 16ft boat to the lake a time or two each year.

            As such, the objectively improved ride and handling characteristics inherent to IRS designs are likely viewed by most potential buyers as the more important attributes. That is certain the calculation I would make.

            As for Suburbans used for towing, note that neither GM has not offered a 3/4 ton chassis version for A LONG time. Excursion has been out of production for a long time too. This fact leads me to believe that BOF SUVs are not typically used as heavy towing vehicles by most owners.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @R Henry:

            Try this website:
            HummerIsTrolling.com

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            A troll says I’m trolling? Interesting.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Perhaps I misspoke. Does “I hate everything on the market these days for the sake of hating everything on the market” work better for you?

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Since when do I hate everything on the market? It’s a hard time for enthusiasts in 2019, the choices have never been fewer.

          • 0 avatar
            tomLU86

            Today’s theme is “big risks for marginal improvements”

            Ford’s Fiesta/Focus trans. Ford got caught.

            Honda’s 1.5 Turbo (vs a 2.4 normally aspirated) seems to have “challenges”

            And now this.

            Yes, IRS offers better ride and handling typically. But, back in the 1970s, GM made the F-car (Camaro/Firebird) handle very well with an axle. But I digress…

            The Tahoe/Suburban tout their “truckability”. Indeed, if one just wants a lot of room, a Traverse is probably better than a Tahoe.

            But trucks connote images of ruggedness. All things being equal, an IRS is not as rugged as a solid axle.

            That’s before towing is factored in. Solid axle is better.

            And now, the sacred cow of…cost. IRS COSTS more to manufacture. So either price must go up, or profit must go down.

            Yes, Ford spent a lot of money to put IRS on the Expedition eons ago. What did they get for it? Oh, and OHC V8s. Car magazines may have approved.

            But a poorer GM (back in 2002) spent it’s limited money on a modern version of an OHV V8, and they kept the axle. They’ve been outselling the Expedition (the Tahoe ALONE) since.

            So, IRS may offer better ride and handling. THese are still heavy vehicles, not for the Nurburgring. If you’ve ridden in a Tahoe, or even a live axle Silverado in the past 10-15 years, the ride is smoother (certainly softer) than many cars. Like a 70s Olds. So the IRS won’t make it much milder.

            It will be more problem-prone because of all the links. It’s less likely to last 250-400k miles (I’ve seen Tahoes/Escalades for sale with this kind of mileage, and they looked like 6 year old cars with 80k…).

            It’s a good example of a big risk for minimal gain.

            These are trucks masquerading as big cars, not Cadillacs trying to be BMWs.

          • 0 avatar
            1500cc

            @Hummer

            “Nothing is gained by switching to IRS except appealing to armchair enthusiast and journalists, neither which had any intention of purchasing these products.”

            The main benefit is a lower floor in the back, something 95% of the customer base will appreciate. Plus better ride and handling. This all benefits the vast majority of use cases for this vehicle.

            As to the other concerns about ‘tires splayed out’: just a matter of setting the correct geometry. Weak differential: totally meaningless complaint; an IRS differential is inherently not any weaker than solid axle, just spec out the proper size. Loss of articulation going offroad: LOL, lots of Suburbans are doing the Baja 1000 I’m sure.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            1500

            GM could lower floor height by getting rid of the ridiculous built in 3rd row, my petite wife has never had any issue putting the 3rd row into her GMT800 twice a year when it’s needed. It’s a useless change.

            I’ll take her GMT800 ride quality over the new expedition every day of the week, meaningless change. Handling? What the hell do you think the suburban is?

          • 0 avatar
            R Henry

            @Hummer

            Each of us has our own unique application for our vehicles. Each has his/her own priorities for what we think is important.

            I don’t dispute that the things you and/or your wife want in a Suburban are legitimate.

            From the manufacturer perspective however, they must look at larger trends…what do MOST of their potential customers want? The vehicles we see in the showrooms reveal how each manufacturer interprets market forces.

            Ford understood that the benefits of IRS were a good fit for what they thought their customers wanted. Today, GM has made the same calculation, and same conclusion Ford made in 2003.

            While this may take a new Suburban out of consideration for you. GM is betting it will make Suburban for a larger slice of the market.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            “Since when do I hate everything on the market?”

            Since…I dunno…2016? Seriously. If they post something about an upcoming model, all I ever see from you is “IRS bad…it’s not a V-8 or a six…I hated the Malibu I rented so all turbo-fours suck…the TourX failed because it wasn’t a Holden…blah blah blah…”

            If it ain’t a V-8, BOF and RWD, you bag on it. It’s old. If you don’t like a Suburban with IRS, don’t buy one. But if Chevy’s doing this, it’s for a reason, and my guess is they’re listening to the 50,000 customers a year who say “I want a bigger third row and a smoother ride” versus the 100 who say “I need to tow a horse trailer and IRS sucks for that.”

            These guys aren’t going to make an IRS Suburban for several years. That gives you plenty of time to buy one without it. Put your money where your mouth is. But I guess that one has a built in third seat, so that’s a no-go too, right?

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “But if Chevy’s doing this, it’s for a reason”

            I think your optimism when it comes to GM is extremely unearned. This is the same crack team in charge of Cadillac and the current Silverado design.

            I’m not as inherently anti-IRS as Hummer but I have no faith in GM building an IRS utility vehicle without it turning into a clown show.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            “ But if Chevy’s doing this, it’s for a reason, and my guess is they’re listening to the 50,000 customers a year who say “I want a bigger third row and a smoother ride” versus the 100 who say “I need to tow a horse trailer and IRS sucks for that.””

            What evidence do you have to suggest this?

            Everyone else has went to IRS and the result EVERY SINGLE TIME was a faultering of sales. The majority of SUV owners clearly don’t want IRS as evidenced by GM essentially owning the entire segment for a decade now.

            Who the hell asked for a 4 cylinder full-size? GM made that. Who asked for a rear engine Vette? GM is making that. Who asked for a smaller more claustrophobic Camaro? GM made that.

            GM under Barra has no idea what the hell consumers want. This change to IRS is icing on the cake.

            You can attack me all you want, but the facts do not support your opinions.

          • 0 avatar
            R Henry

            Hubris is always a possibility. GM might be wrong. You might be wrong too.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            While there certainly are more wear parts in an IRS than a set of leafs, the Expedition and the last BOF Explorer’s IRS is great for towing. No the wheels don’t splay out when loaded even beyond the rating. Yes there is a little bit of camber gain and that is a good thing for stability and better handling.

            I’ve got a big two axle travel trailer and where I park it is much easier with the Mountaineer than my F250 CC 8′. Because it is just moving it around the yard I don’t put on the weight distribution torsion bars. So it ends up very low but yet its wheels aren’t splayed out.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            “No the wheels don’t splay out when loaded even beyond the rating.“

            I’ve seen innumerous Expeditions with the rear wheels splayed out when towing. It’s a pretty poor setup for towing and does exactly what you don’t want to happen when towing. Expedition buyers would be better suited buying the flex since the BOF expedition is incapable of being a truck.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            “GM could lower floor height by getting rid of the ridiculous built in 3rd row, my petite wife has never had any issue putting the 3rd row into her GMT800 twice a year when it’s needed. It’s a useless change.”

            The 3rd row seats in my GMT-900 ‘Hoe are identical to the ones in a GMT-800. They are heavy and awkward and most(by most I mean 98% of the women out there) would not be OK with removing or installing those seats.

            I let someone use my ‘Hoe for a couple of weeks while they were looking for something to replace an older Durango they had gotten rid of. I think he wanted a ‘Hoe but his wife took one look at the 3rd row in that truck and said no way. They ended up buying a different FS BOF SUV with you got it…….and IRS and much more mom friendly 3rd row.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          My sister-in-law who lives in small-town Texas has now owned four straight Suburbans or Yukon XLs. She is fanatically loyal and represents a large part of the consumer base. And the switch to IRS will be nothing but upside for her. If she ever tows it’s nothing more than a small utility trailer. She’s never driven any farther off-road than the two-track that goes to her husband’s hunting lease. But she uses her third row every day, and that third row will get a lot more spacious. And I know she’ll appreciate the better ride.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            So if she has no need for SUV capability then why not own an Enclave or XT6?

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Because in the town where she lives those would be considered “small cars” and it is necessary for her to be the queen bee. I believe many Suburban buyers, likely a majority of them, own Suburbans either for that reason or because they pack the interiors full of people and stuff routinely.

            Edited to add: she saw my Highlander in person this past summer and called it a “nice little car,” and just expressed puzzlement over a picture of our Bolt.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            This isn’t really a segment I have any plans to buy in, but I’m a little surprised intenders would like a change that makes the big BOF SUV less capable for doing BOF SUV things. Then again I want GM to soften the Camaro into a Monte Carlo redux so what do I know.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            I firmly believe that the majority of BOF SUV buyers are not using them to do BOF SUV things, and that a substantial number of the rest do BOF SUV things only infrequently.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “This isn’t really a segment I have any plans to buy in, but I’m a little surprised intenders would like a change that makes the big BOF SUV less capable for doing BOF SUV things.”

            they DON’T CARE if it’s BoF or has a live axle. They care about whether it’s big enough and if it can do what they want. if GM makes a change that improves ride quality, rear seat space, and still do the things they need, that is 100% benefit for them.

            you guys need to get it through your heads that 99.99999% of the 15-16 million light vehicles sold every year are *not* being bought by spec-obsessed geeks who spend most of their time arguing on the Internet about vehicles they have no intention of buying.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “they DON’T CARE if it’s BoF or has a live axle. They care about whether it’s big enough and if it can do what they want.”

            If what people really want is a LWB Traverse then why not build that instead? My (perhaps very incorrect) assumption had always been that GM’s large SUV buyers appreciated the vehicle’s more truck-like capabilities even if they were rarely (or even never) being used.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            “So if she has no need for SUV capability then why not own an Enclave or XT6”

            Because people buy what makes them feel good. Never bought a car or truck in my life that didn’t have some emotion tied up into the purchase decision & I wouldn’t have it any other way.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      I bet IRS and 2.7T base engine.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Probably right Ajla, this is Barras legacy after all, a hurricane destroying all goodwill the company has created with its “core” product.

        Note: I said “core”.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          So…the core Suburban buyer is someone who’s into towing, big time. Mary Barra no doubt knows this, and is just trying to p*ss them off…just because. Why? She clearly wants to sell fewer vehicles, and watch the company go broke. That way she loses her job.

          It all makes perfect sense to me now!

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            “ Mary Barra no doubt knows this, and is just trying to p*ss them off…just because. Why? She clearly wants to sell fewer vehicles, and watch the company go broke. That way she loses her job.”

            She’s only waiting for the Chinese to buy out GM and give her a nice retirement.

            If you could provide evidence that refutes my points you are free to do so. All you have done up to now is attack me on something you clearly don’t understand.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            The beauty of presenting BS like “Barra wants to destroy all the goodwill it has with its’ customers” (you know, the customers who buy stuff from the company she draws a paycheck from…rolls eyes) as an argument is that BS can’t be proven or disproven. It’s just BS.

            People who do this then invariably ask the person they’re BSing – I mean, arguing with – to “disprove” it, which of course, is impossible, so the BSer declares victory. Which you did, of course.

            It’s a perfect way to win arguments in your own mind if you have no idea what you’re talking about. Troll technique for the ages.

            It’s old.

            My prediction? Suburban buyers are more into hauling people than stuff, so making it a better people mover – which IRS does – yields greater sales. Sales go up. People who need to haul a crapload of stuff buy a HD pickup – which Chevrolet happens to build as well – instead.

            Feel free to “disprove” that.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Simply put your going against every shred of evidence available to support your opinions. Your clearly trolling at this point because reason and fact seem to be your enemy.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “It’s a perfect way to win arguments in your own mind if you have no idea what you’re talking about. Troll technique for the ages.”

            it’s not trolling. This kind of thinking is literally baked into American culture. We all want to believe reality is whatever we say it is, because we’re just So Damn Smart.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        I’ll bet that Tahoe Custom trim only available with 2.7 TRIPOWER!

    • 0 avatar
      NTGD

      To be the Commodore of Suburbans wouldn’t it have to be the new Blazer? Commodore went from being a fullsize RWD car to a midsize FWD car. The Suburban is getting a new rear suspension I don’t think it is quite the same.

      Sidenote why does spell check want me to fix both fullsize and RWD but midsize and FWD don’t get red lines?

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        They took a vehicle second only to the F150 as most American vehicle and turned it from a honest work truck to a vanity product with no function to be worked.

        This is just as severe. A huge loss for America.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Oh, the humanity! The Suburban doesn’t have a solid rear axle anymore. The End of America is near!

          (Faints)

        • 0 avatar
          Hydromatic

          An “honest work truck”? Aside from livery services, the U.S. Secret Service and a spattering of alphabet-lettered agencies, no one uses the Suburban as a “work truck.”

          Look, maybe you’re better off buying a quad-cab Silverado 1500. Maybe even a 2500HD. In fact, that’s precisely what GM wants you to do.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Hydro, there are tons of companies that use Suburbans as work trucks. I believe every surveyor in this country seems to have one in their arsenal, the DOT has thousands, painters seem to love them, power companies all seem to flock to them.

            Where do you live that these aren’t work trucks?

    • 0 avatar
      shane_the_ee

      Look, if you don’t have 4+ kids, the 3/4T pickup is a far better tow vehicle for the same price (if not less) than a 1/2T SUV. If you do have 4+ kids, the packaging compromises required for the SRA far outweigh the benefits. Particularly if the IRS is specifically designed for heavy towing. Is the SRA simpler and cheaper? Sure, but we’re talking about folks spending $60-80k because it enables them to buy toys which are $15k-$120k. In this market segment, cost isn’t exactly the buyer’s primary concern. – 2018 Expedition Max FX4 owner.

    • 0 avatar
      shane_the_ee

      Look, if you don’t have 4+ kids, the 3/4T pickup is a far better tow vehicle for the same price (if not less) than a 1/2T SUV. If you do have 4+ kids, the packaging compromises required for the SRA far outweigh the benefits. Particularly if the IRS is specifically designed for heavy towing. Is the SRA simpler and cheaper? Sure, but we’re talking about folks spending $60-80k because it enables them to buy toys which are $15k-$120k. In this market segment, cost isn’t exactly the buyer’s primary concern. – 2018 Expedition Max FX4 owner with 4 kids.

    • 0 avatar
      Cobra427

      Here are two answers:

      1) Build a 1500 (1/2 ton) with IRS and a 2500 (3/4 ton) with the stick axle.

      2) Buy a crew cab Silverado and purchase a nice topper for it to cap the bed.

  • avatar
    EGSE

    Al Bundy (to daughter): “What color is an orange?”

    Kelly Bundy: (clueless expression)

    Al Bundy: “Yes it is you!”

  • avatar
    R Henry

    Expedition gained IRS in 2003. SEVENTEEN YEARS AGO!!!!!!!

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      …and in so doing, lost all the 100 Expedition customers nationwide who used them to tow 10 zillion pounds every day. Pour one out.

      • 0 avatar
        shane_the_ee

        Cite needed. I bought an 2018 Expedition Max to serve as a tow vehicle for a 6000lb travel trailer. Over 50% of my miles are towing miles. And, according to Ford’s marketing department, over 60% of expedition buyers will tow something with them and about 40% will tow something on a regular basis.

        The problem with these silly “IRS” vs “SRA” arguments is they’re all theoretical. “Theoretically” the SRA is a better rear axle than the IRS. But we’re not in the theoretical world. In the real world, if you want to tow a trailer with a tongue weight over 780 lbs, you get a truck or an Expedition or you overload your GM product. In the real world you have Ford’s 3.23 and 3.73 (mated to the 3.5L Ecoboost), GM’s 3.08 and 3.42 (mated to their 5.3L V8) and GM’s 3.24 (mated to the 6.2L V8). And in the real world, that 3.73 has a RAWR which is 180lbs higher than the highest GM offering. And that 3.73 is attached to a lighter weight body. Which means your real world IRS actually has significantly more usable capacity than your real world SRA.

        • 0 avatar
          jack4x

          I am honestly curious what GM will do for the fleet only Suburban HD. If they rate the IRS as capable of handling thousands of pounds of armor application, that would ease my concerns greatly about its use in towing. If they build two different suspension designs into the same vehicle, one for consumer and one for fleet use, that would also tell me something.

          I continue to believe the best solution is splitting the 1/2 ton line into a consumer focused vehicle with lower load floor, better ride, and reasonable towing. Basically the current plan. Then offer a true HD variation (not the weak sauce 07-14 2500-non HD) to satisfy crazies like Hummer and myself. Everyone wins.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            I honestly believe that sales of an SUV-bodied 3/4-ton truck would be too low to recoup development costs. The Excursion was the best-selling vehicle of that nature by a long shot, yet it usually sold around 20k copies annually (with a big exception of 50k in its first full year, which also happened to fall right at the peak of the personal-use SUV craze). Others have been in four figures.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Dal

            How would a 3/4 truck with a 3rd row seat and rear hatch selling at 20k units per year be too low to recoup development costs, yet GM does a diesel equinox/Cruze, the Bolt which cost billions to develop and has lackluster sales, the Tour X development, the Blackwood V8, the entire CT6 as a car, etc all get green lighted.

            An honest SUV that’s built on the already manufactured truck bones is a very low cost way to steal sales from other manufacturers.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            Then offer a true HD variation (not the weak sauce 07-14 2500-non HD) to satisfy crazies like Hummer and myself. Everyone wins.

            Didn’t know the GMT-900 2500 ‘Burbs were weak sauce. What did you tow with one and how heavy that you came to that conclusion? I know they had the same bullet proof 6.0 motor and transmission that was in my 2004 Sierra HD.

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            I actually did own a GMT800 Avalanche 2500, and it like the Suburban 2500 was not a true 2500HD but derived its frame and suspension from the MY2000 1500HD/2500LD. Towing capacity at 9600 lb was much lower than the HD trucks and barely better than a light duty Expedition.

            By comparison the Excursion was built on a RCLB F250 frame. That kind of truck today is rated to tow 15,000 lb, and an SUV version would be similar, perhaps minus a bit to compensate for the added weight of the body and interior.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            “I actually did own a GMT800 Avalanche 2500, and it like the Suburban 2500 was not a true 2500HD but derived its frame and suspension from the MY2000 1500HD/2500LD. ”

            Well sure that makes sense, as I believe the only difference between a 2500 and 2500HD PU in GMT-800 trim was the frame. The HD was more like a 1 ton truck without the dual wheels. I dropped a 3500lb pallet of pavers in the back of mine and headed 150 miles north with it.

            I’ll tell you one thing, the money people are asking for GMT-900 3/4 ton ‘Burbs with 250K-300K miles on them is absolutely ridiculous.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            @ DAL GM has been offering a 1 ton Suburban for a number of years, fleet only, mainly for armor upfitting. So they do thing that there is some profit since much of it is just pulled from the parts bin. So add in a retail version that has a higher tow rating and with a 80K+ price tag there certainly should be enough profit to build a unique frame and floor pan.

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            A clean 7.3L Excursion still commands 50-75% of its MSRP at almost 20 years old.

            There is demand for these trucks out there.

  • avatar
    JMII

    Do Bumble Bee and Herbie have a star too?

  • avatar
    crtfour

    Hopefully the IRS will get rid of the jacked up look on the back of these (which I have always thought looked awkward. It looks especially bad on the Escalade.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      Will this also eliminate the rear passenger head banging that normally occurs?

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      “Hopefully the IRS will get rid of the jacked up look on the back of these (which I have always thought looked awkward. It looks especially bad on the Escalade.”

      I think you need to get your eyes checked. Go to the top of the page and tell me the ‘Burb in the picture is jacked up in the rear. I’ve owned my 2007 ‘Hoe since new and it sits perfectly level. You do realize the majority of the GM FS SUV’s all have load leveling rear suspension systems.

  • avatar
    jfk-usaf

    I’d love to see a year by year Chinese part content percentage over those 85ish years. Then I could identify exactly when that shark was jumped…

  • avatar

    The only award the suburban deserves is the K-mart interior of the year.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      I had a rental loaded LTZ last month for a couple days. It had a perfectly fine interior for a $35K vehicle. Unfortunately, MSRP was about $65K… They aren’t as bad as they used to be, but they aren’t all that great either. But it and the Expedition do fill a niche that nothing else on the market can. The Expedition is a LOT nicer inside.

  • avatar
    MrIcky

    I’ve always wanted a black suburban with black steel wheels. I’d put a bunch of antennas on it and drive it around N. Idaho and watch the locals scurry to the safety of their bunkers and tinfoil hats.

    Thanks movies and tv for making every federal agent since Fox Mulder drive a tahoe or suburban (I have to say the Hollywood CoC has a point).

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    A car getting a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame is about the stupidest thing I’ve heard of.

    • 0 avatar
      tomLU86

      SOunds like MT Car of the Year. Spend enough money so that the right amount goes to the right people and …voila! The “coveted” (by whom, I don’t know, besides automakers) COTY award (sounds an awful lot like a certain feminine product), or in this case…Walk of Fame! Never mind the Corvette, or Mercedes 450SL, or 1970s Chrysler mid-size cop cars, all of which have been pretty prominent.

  • avatar
    EGSE

    Tahoes are the choice for LE on the East Coast (shorter hence easier to get through gridlocked traffic). And the new-gen antennas are small enough you wouldn’t notice them.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    Yowza, a lot to unpack in the comment section here…

    As an actual owner of a black 08′ Suburban I have several thoughts. First, I freaking love my Suburban. The only car in my stable that will not be sold, except maybe someday to the wrecking yard when it has 400k miles on it.

    The IRS V. SRA, the Escalade and Yukon XL are very much a consideration in the matter and both of those offerings will become more competitive in the market with a more spacious interior after the front seats than continuing with a SRA. The IRS permits for a for a more expansive interior.

    Shane_the_ee: You had an interesting follow up comment regarding the gear ratios etc. But my eyes tell me the Expedition is not used for towing by very many people at all, if hardly ever. Same for the Suburban really, summer time you will see one here or there with a camper. Obviously location matters, but here in CO, you just don’t see many Expeditions towing.

    Akear: give it a rest. The interior of the Suburban is fine. Mine was inserviced in 9/07 and I bought it 01/10/10 so I am knocking on ten years. I have one small crack in the dash otherwise it looks new. Tan interior, so some stains exist. Compared to my business parnters 14′ BMW 650i M Sport (118k MSRP) the Chevy is amazing, his looks like a war zone, passenger door panel comes loose overtime you close the door seats look like ass and not that comfortable.

    Hummer: While I see you point on the towing, my eyes tell me you are the signification minority who tows big loads with their Burb. I think GM pulls business from Infiniti, Lexus, Toyota, Nissan, & Ford with a new Burb and IRS. Not because of the IRS, but gains in interior space, ease of entry and eagress etc.

    I get the Cadillac hate, they have screwed up so many things. But the one thing they did right, the Escalade. Love or hate it you can not argue with how many were sold and the fact that for almost two decades it was the standard go to luxury SUV go to for the well healed with families.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      A crappy interior that holds up fine is a crappy interior. You can kill the nicest interior ever made if you abuse it. The Suburban’s interior is not commensurate with what they cost these days. It’s not *bad*, but it typical GM slightly crappy for the money. EVERYTHING smells of slightly cheap, from the switch gear to the leather. Functional for sure, but for $50-70K, and much of that PURE PROFIT (because fundamentally this is a $25K pickup truck with a welded on cap), it should be nicer inside.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      “Shane_the_ee: You had an interesting follow up comment regarding the gear ratios etc. But my eyes tell me the Expedition is not used for towing by very many people at all, if hardly ever. Same for the Suburban really, summer time you will see one here or there with a camper. Obviously location matters, but here in CO, you just don’t see many Expeditions towing.”

      great. we have one guy’s anecdote. So your anecdote is evidence everything is the same across the entire continent.

      people need to stop acting like their extremely limited personal experiences are applicable across the board.

  • avatar
    whynotaztec

    All this yammering about rear suspensions………..what if GM beats this thing to death with the ugly stick?

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      Good point!

      For me the GMT-900’s were peak Suburban/Tahoe. The current gen has never grown on me with it’s goofy front headlights, smallish greenhouse and funky body line on the side. The GMT-800’s were great trucks but the interiors on the GMT-900’s are heads and tails better & they drive and ride so much nicer. Exterior styling is subjective but as far as a good looking, clean, well balanced & cohesive design for my eyes it’s again GMT-900 FTW.

  • avatar

    The good news is they can’t possibly make the visibility any worse than it is now.

    My wife really wanted a Suburban, until she drove it. The blind spots are terrible, the side mirrors are tiny, the rear window is a tiny slit. And if you get the DVD players for kids they drop out of the roof in both back rows completely blocking all rear visibility. The third row is too small for a teenager and can only fit two comfortably.

    We ended up with an expedition and she loves it. And we can actually fit three people in the third row.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    A long time ago (circa 1998-2001) [or not so long ago, depending on what you think of truck product cycles], I was the finance geek supporting the Escalade and Yukon/Yukon XL brand teams. At that time, GM generally knew not to screw up their fullsize trucks and SUV’s (and they generally assigned some of their best people to those platforms).

    A lot of water has gone under the bridge, and GM is a different legal entity now. I am no expert on new GM or the current state of their fullsize SUV’s or the details of IRS vs. SRA or current customer use cases. But we can make the following observations:

    – In the late 90’s, GM changed over production at Arlington Assembly from the B platform to fullsize SUV’s. There was much wailing and gnashing of teeth. After this, Arlington became the The Most Profitable Automotive Plant on the Planet (TM) – and may still be.
    – The side-hinged rear panel doors (“cargo doors” aka “barn doors”) were discontinued in ~2005 (from what I see). These were popular with ‘towing people’ because you could more easily access the rear of the vehicle with the trailer attached.
    – The 2500 (“3/4 Ton”) models were discontinued after the 2013MY. [Possibly little-known facts: 2500HD Suburban models (rental/commercial fleet only) and 3500HD Suburban models (government only – for up-armoring) became available in 2016MY.]
    – Sales since 2007 have never come close to 2007 levels.
    – There are currently many upscale/luxury offerings in the *pickup* market which will hold people (not three rows of people) and tow your stuff and which weren’t available before.

    If GM is moving to IRS, they may have very good reasons, or they may be following the lemmings off a cliff (no well-informed opinion here). They may execute the change well, or maybe not (no advance opinion offered).

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      One more:
      – Rented a GMT900 Suburban for an extended road trip with 6 people plus luggage. It was just about ideal for the purpose – but the vertical height of the rear opening was embarrassingly small compared to a minivan of the time (due to the height of the load floor).

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