By on October 14, 2019

Image: GM

Not happy with sales thus far this year, General Motors wants Ford Mustang owners to know there’ll be cash waiting for them should they wander into a dealer in search of a Chevrolet Camaro.

As 2019 draws to a close, GM’s pony car sits in third place in the niche segment’s sales standings. This, despite a 2019 model year refresh and a greater availability of four-cylinder offerings. Maybe a few grand will compel rival owners to make the switch?

It’s certainly possible it could sway a few. Until the end of the month, GM has $3,000 waiting for any Mustang owner or lessee who feels like picking up a ’19 model — a $500 boost from last month’s Mustang bribe, GM Authority reports.

The discount only applies to purchases, while non-Mustang owners or lessees can only expect a grand in customer cash.

Conquest offers are nothing new, but GM’s offer could help dealers clear the lot of 2019 Camaro SS models ahead of the release of the hastily made-over 2020 model. This is no small thing, as the 2020 SS model corrects a styling decision that saw the ’19 SS derided in many online circles. GM clearly listened in on some of those conversations.

Despite a 6.3 percent sales increase in the third quarter (4.6 percent for Chevy-badged models), the Camaro suffered with a 15-percent drop in the previous three-month period. Year to date, Camaro sales are down 7.6 percent. And, while the Mustang also recorded a 10.1-percent YTD drop, its volume outpaces Camaro by nearly 20,000 units through September. Dodge’s ancient Challenger fell 11 percent through September, but was actually up 21 percent in Q3.

Year-to-date sales of Fiat Chrysler’s pony car outmuscle Camaro by about 10,000 units.

[Image: General Motors]

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37 Comments on “Take a Chance on Me? GM Incentivizes Mustang-to-Camaro Conversions...”


  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Is X-ray vision an option here? You’ll need it to see out of this car.

    • 0 avatar
      Robotdawn

      I had a Camaro as a rental car last week. Visibility is better than I expected, but still not great. They may as well remove the rear-view mirror if they aren’t going to put a camera in it’s place though. The back window is a joke.
      I assume it was a 4 cylinder. Very smooth, although it tended to act like it was doing more than it actually was. Smooth isn’t what I want out of a Camaro.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Challenger is still my favorite of the 3. Amazing that the Challenger still sells as well as it does–I guess there are others that feel the same way about the Challenger that I do.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Hertz, National and Avis definitely feel good about the Challenger.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        I’m not sure that the fleet percentage for the Dodge is any higher than the other two. The convertible styles of the Camaro/Mustang are especially fleet heavy.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          That too.

          But, yeah, I see *tons* of Challengers and Chargers with rental plates around here. Had a V-8 Challenger as a rental in Florida a few years back for a three week business trip. A good time was had.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      When offered a choice of 3 sizzling steaks, for the same price; many, if not most, Americans will generally pick the biggest one.

      Lack of a ‘vert aside, the Challenger would be my pick as well. It’s just a more comfortable car in day to day driving than the other two, which seem like more of a second car, or weekend toy, for all but the most devoted muscle car aficionado petrolheads willing to make more sacrifices than me.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    As of last week I still couldn’t find the “build your own” function on the Chevrolet web page for the 2020 Camaro (2019 was there). Camaro was the only Chevrolet vehicle that the 2020 build-your-own wasn’t available for.

    They must truly be up to their eyeballs in 2019 models.

    Does the offer specify whether people have to trade in their Mustangs to take advantage or just show up with a valid registration of a Mustang?

    • 0 avatar
      Robotdawn

      Still not there for 2020. I keep checking myself. It seems the only way I’m ever going to get a V8 in a GM product under 40k may be the Camaro LT. I’ve always been a fan of the “stripper” model V8s sedans everyone used to make.
      It’s a shame Ms. Barra has gone all sensible and business-like. I much preferred GM when they didn’t understand how to make money.

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    I rented one of these for a track day. It drives really well, but it’s hard to see out of and the trunk opening is so small it would be hard to get a normal sized suitcase in it.

    The interior could be spiffed up as well, rather too much hard plastic.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    Both Ford and GM should be ashamed that they can not handily outsell the Challenger. The Challenger still looks like the better car and sells very well despite not having a drop top and to the advantage of not having a dumbarse 4 cylinder in a muscle car unlike the other two supposed muscle cars.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      If GM was serious about this car they would price is within reason, the V8 should be starting more than a couple thousand under $30k, the 4 cylinder isn’t fit to replace a Cruze and the V6 should start under $20k.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Too bad the Challenger is such a Porky Pig that the four-pot versions of both the Camaro and Mustang are decisively faster than the Pentastar Challenger, which has the distinction of being the slowest pony car for sale in America.

      • 0 avatar
        Maymar

        Hell, the four-cyl Camaro/Mustang are breathing right down the neck of 5.7L Challengers (which, fun car, but it’s a personal luxury coupe for guys who think Wooderson from Dazed and Confused is an aspirational figure).

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Who cares if the 4 cylinder had 0-60 of 2 seconds, your still driving a 4 cylinder in a muscle car, spare the embarrassment and just off yourself at that point.

        • 0 avatar
          TR4

          How about a 28 liter four?

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiat_S76_Record

        • 0 avatar
          Maymar

          More or less embarrassing than being the driver of a Challenger R/T that got dusted by a four-cyl muscle car?

          Also, what ever happened to the term “pony car?” Not like the Mustang and Camaro haven’t spent their entire lives with the small engined variants setting the business case for the V8 models existing. Just, the small ones don’t suck any more (although I’d be just as academically interested in them if they were called Capri and Manta instead).

  • avatar

    Here in The Current Year, Mustang > Camaro.

    FACT

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      The 10A Mustang GT is very, very good.

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      Nah.

      I’ll be the lonely guy to stick up for the Camaro. The visibility thing is the most overrated concern imaginable. Seriously. It’s fine, you get used to it in no time.

      6.2>5.0

      Flame suit is securely on. Come at me.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Nah, I won’t flame, but I would take the Mustang, even with the smaller engine.

        1) FAR better looking.
        2) Fewer visibility issues.

        The bigger engine would probably be great on a track, but in real-world driving, I can’t imagine it being that big of an advantage.

        • 0 avatar

          Better looking, better visibility, and a better interior. Camaro comes up short.

        • 0 avatar
          jack4x

          It’s the opposite for me.

          The higher revving 5.0 is better suited for a track IMO while the 6.2 will have more torque in daily driving situations.

          I’ve made my opinion known on the visibility. My Viper makes the Camaro’s glass look like a old C10’s and I was used to it within a week. Agree to disagree I guess.

          Agree that the Camaro looks worse outside but to me the Mustang looks worse inside. Toggle switches and “Ground Speed” on the speedometer are just stupid. There’s a reason the GT350 gets its own interior without that silliness.

          • 0 avatar
            Maymar

            The Camaro’s visibility is mostly a problem because there’s no good reason for it. It’s not like it’s the 3rd or 4th gens (or your Viper for that matter) which are at least really low slung and sleek. The Camaro’s still going for a modernized ’69 look, which should be able to work just fine with decent sized windows.

          • 0 avatar
            Featherston

            +2 to you, Maymar and ajla (below). I think the current Challenger is a nice homage to the 1st-gen. The 5th-gen Camaro, OTOH, is a cartoon version of its 1st-gen. And, in a manner typical of 2010s business execs, Chevy doubled-down on the error with the 6th-gen. Something more restrained would look better and be more practical, yet it would still be pretty racy looking in an absolute sense.

            All variants of the three Pony cars are pretty intriguing at this point. There’s not a slow, boring one in the bunch, and I could see a potential buyer making a valid case for anything from the least powerful base trim to the most souped up. The Camaro, though, is the one I’d probably be least likely to gamble my own money on, based on how the 5th-gen seemed when I sat in one at an auto show.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        It isn’t really a visibility issue it is a comfort issue. On the Camaro, the beltline feels too high while the roof feels very low. It’s too claustrophobic for me. Maybe I’ll “get used to it” but that’s a $40K gamble. In contrast the Mustang feels about the same as the Stinger from the front seat.

        As far as 6.2L vs 5.0L, it is pretty dead even IMO since the 2018 Ford updates and winding a V8 out to 7000RPM is a lot of fun.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          Reminder – the Camaro has generally been the automotive press’ darling since the 1st gen but the Mustang has been the people’s choice (in sales) almost since the inception of the rivalry.

          This was especially true in the Fox body years.

          • 0 avatar
            ToolGuy

            Historically – in general – the Camaro offered better track performance/stats and the Mustang was easier to live with.

            Camaro has followed Pontiac down the hole of offering the public what the writers say the enthusiasts are clamoring for.

            Ford was smarter here.

        • 0 avatar
          scott25

          Agree with Ajla, it’s mostly about the high belt line and the low roof, it’s about feeling cramped and far smaller inside than it actually is, and it makes the hood seem about 30 feet long. The Camaro just doesn’t seem practical compared to the Mustang and Challenger. The 4 cylinder Mustang also feels much more sprightly than the 4 cylinder Camaro.

          I just wish the Mustang V6 still existed, it was a great engine for that car. The V6 would probably be my choice in the Camaro as well.

      • 0 avatar
        nrd515

        I don’t really care about the visibility, I don’t see the problem. The problem is, it’s just a hideous car with an unusable trunk, and seriously ugly interior. I haven’t understood what GM was going for with it since 2010 when it was reintroduced. When the ’16 car was announced, I got my hopes up, only to see they had somehow, someway, made it even uglier than it already was. A great car in a very ugly wrapper. As ugly as the present front end is, the back end makes it look pretty good. The back end is amazingly bad.

        The C8 is ugly too.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      “Here in The Current Year, Mustang > Camaro.

      FACT”

      I’m picturing you adhering an image of Calvin urinating on a brand logo to the rear window of your vehicle at this moment.

  • avatar
    thalter

    Lead photo shows the (improved) 2020 model, which is a little misleading.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    As a Mustang owner: Sorry, Chevy! I just don’t like the little windows. The visibility of my 2014 Mustang is bad enough!

  • avatar
    dougjp

    ” greater availability of four-cylinder offerings ”

    In a Camaro,thought to be a sales advantage? Now that’s funny because all it does is deflate the brand.

    • 0 avatar
      Featherston

      I’m not sure, but I think Steph was referring to the fact that as of ’19 you can get the 2.0T with the 1LE performance package (suspension goodies from the SS, if I’m understanding things correctly from the Chevy configurator).

      As to whether or not a 275-hp/295 lb-ft base engine deflates the brand, Maymar sums things up well in a comment above: “Not like the Mustang and Camaro haven’t spent their entire lives with the small engined variants setting the business case for the V8 models existing. Just, the small ones don’t suck any more. . . .”

  • avatar
    nrd515

    I don’t really care about the visibility, I don’t see the problem. The problem is, it’s just a hideous car with an unusable trunk, and seriously ugly interior. I haven’t understood what GM was going for with it since 2010 when it was reintroduced. When the ’16 car was announced, I got my hopes up, only to see they had somehow, someway, made it even uglier than it already was. A great car in a very ugly wrapper. As ugly as the present front end is, the back end makes it look pretty good. The back end is amazingly bad.

    The C8 is ugly too.

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