By on October 17, 2019

Image: Ford/YouTube

There’s rumblings that Ford’s upcoming electric crossover — you know, the “Mustang-inspired” hot rod EV for the whole family ⁠— may make an appearance very soon. Due to go on sale in 2020, the vehicle is Ford’s first serious attempt to enter the electric vehicle field (apologies to the defunct Focus Electric, which found itself outclassed almost as soon as it appeared).

Getting Americans out of their brodozers will not be an easy feat, however, and the folks at the Blue Oval know it. With this in mind, Ford is offering future…Mach E?…buyers as many places to juice up as possible.

On Thursday, the automaker claimed Ford EV buyers will be able to plug in at 12,000 public charging stations (encompassing 35,000 plugs), including those offered by Volkswagen’s Electrify America. The FordPass Charging Network is the product of a collaboration with EV charging provider Greenlots; together, the companies secured access to various charging networks for users of the FordPass phone app.

In addition to the charging network, Ford teamed with Amazon Home Services to install 240-volt garage plugs and beefier 48-amp Ford Connected Charge Stations. If would-be buyers feel that they’ll never want for juice, Ford believes it can make a sale.

Image: Ford/YouTube

“Among people who already own or want to purchase electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids, 48 percent say that a lack of charging stations is one of their main concerns,” said Ted Cannis, Ford director of global electrification. “By offering industry-leading charging access we are dismantling those barriers, allowing more customers to confidently enjoy the benefits of owning an electric vehicle.”

While Ford’s EVs, like those of its rivals, will come with a Ford Mobile Charger for connecting to random outlets, fueling up at a 120- or 240-volt plug can be a tedious affair (assuming you’re out and about, not sleeping at home). Plugging the upcoming Ford crossover into a regular wall outlet gets you 3 miles per hour, in the EV charging sense of the term. Going with a 240-volt plug ups that charge rate to 22 miles per hour.

Image: Ford

With the Ford-badged 48-amp home outlet, the automaker claims 32 miles can be poured back into the battery pack each hour. A better solution, for sure, though the countrywide charging network access is perhaps the bigger perk. If you can get to a DC fast-charge outlet, like those provided by Electrify America, drivers can top up to the tune of 47 miles in 10 minutes. A 10-to-80-percent fill-up at one of these 150 kW stations should take 45 minutes.

While that’s a wildly greater delay than filling up at a gas station, Ford’s upcoming EV is expected to go 300 or more miles on a charge. We’re a long way from Focus Electric territory here.

That said, even with this much access to electricity, will it be enough to persuade buyers to choose the vehicle over an Explorer or Edge? Time will tell. We don’t know the model’s pricing, or even what it looks like. Still, the company claims it plans to turn a profit off its upcoming EVs ⁠— a crop that includes the looming electric F-150 and a brace of Ford and Lincoln midsize crossovers due for the 2023 model year. At least once those vehicles arrive, there’ll be juice waiting.

[Images: Ford]

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30 Comments on “If You Build It, Will They Charge? Ford Sure Hopes So...”


  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    Electric Ford Ranger was production electric vehicle by Ford before the electric Focus.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    I do not accept the premise that a lack of public charging infrastructure is what is holding sales of EV back.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      “Among people who already own or want to purchase electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids, 48 percent say that a lack of charging stations is one of their main concerns,” said Ted Cannis, Ford director of global electrification. “By offering industry-leading charging access we are dismantling those barriers, allowing more customers to confidently enjoy the benefits of owning an electric vehicle.”

      This is at least partly about helping people so stupid that they bought EVs first and then figured out that charging them was inconvenient.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      As we have clearly seen, even here on TTAC, if those charging stations aren’t at every street corner, many won’t even consider a BEV.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    This is more about psychology than actual needs for charging. People have range anxiety because they’ve never used EVs and don’t know how they work, and Ford is trying to make them feel better.

    Actual EV users know you need just a few kinds of chargers:

    1) Home chargers wherever they’re practical (private home or apartment garages, reserved private parking spots, driveways)

    2) Enough public fast chargers to allow people who park on the street to charge weekly or whatever

    3) Fast chargers along highways, making road trips possible

    Most other chargers are superfluous. People will eventually figure that out as more of them get experience with EVs. But for now this is an attempt to lessen pre-EV-purchase anxiety.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      To add to this, the future of non-home charging is grocery stores IMO. People in cities who park on the street and don’t drive much often do drive to the grocery store. And you’re typically in the store for a while. The routine will be: drive to store, plug into fast charger (& pay by swiping your phone), spend 30-60 minutes in store shopping, come out, and have enough juice to cover your trips until your next store visit (usually the following week).

      • 0 avatar
        SPPPP

        “To add to this, the future of non-home charging is grocery stores IMO.”

        Hey, this is a smart idea.

        • 0 avatar
          TMA1

          All these public chargers on the street and at the grocery store and at highway rest stops are a great idea, assuming there’s no one else parked there when you arrive. If so, be prepared to wait for an hour while while that person is doing the weekend grocery shopping for a family of four.

          A typical inner-ring suburban grocery store can still have a few hundred parking spots. It’ll be a long time before all those spots will have electricity available.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Prediction: the proportion of spots with electric chargers will rise with the proportion of EVs, and will be some fraction of it. You’ll never need chargers in all the spots. Eventually they’ll be placed at the back, not the front, to ensure availability. And the market will have incentive to ensure there are enough for availability almost all the time.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      How fast is a “fast” charger?

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      2 and 3 are going to be the tough ones as EV market share goes up.

      I’ve generally been a bigger fan of PHEVs over BEVs because they come with smaller, cheaper batteries and let you home-charge & go EV-only for daily commutes, but can utilize the existing ICE infrastructure for longer trips or emergencies.

      Of course the downside to a PHEV is that you still have to deal with ICE engine maintenance and NVH (for those that hate such things).

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Honestly I think the public charging infrastructure will come pretty easily. Chargers are super-cheap. Upgrading the grid is less cheap but the utilities are well aware of the need. And the market can handle distribution. As the number of EVs grows, the number of spaces in (say) a grocery store parking lot that have chargers will also grow to meet demand. It’s already happening at limited scale, and will grow as the number of EVs grows.

        Plug-ins are expensive and complicated. They’ll be good solutions in the interim for some people, but (especially as battery prices fall and people realize they don’t need 300+ miles of range) it will honestly be much cheaper to build out the charging infrastructure enough for most people to use BEVs than to keep equipping every car with an ICE and transmission.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      “This is more about psychology than actual needs for charging. People have range anxiety because they’ve never used EVs and don’t know how they work, and Ford is trying to make them feel better.

      Actual EV users know you need just a few kinds of chargers:”

      Somebody didn’t read the article.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        What about what I wrote is inconsistent with the article?

        Ford is offering people a huge charging network with all sorts of random stations.

        A few of them in specific categories will help EV users. Most won’t.

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          “Among people who already own or want to purchase electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids, 48 percent say that a lack of charging stations is one of their main concerns,” said Ted Cannis, Ford director of global electrification.

          This is not exclusively about getting more people to surrender their real cars. It’s also about people who already made the mistake and are now concerned about the lack of charging stations, having comprehensively failed to think things through before making a major purchase.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Current cars’ fast chargers allow between 50 and 150 kW (up to a point, usually 80% of full charge), so you typically can fill up most of the way within an hour at most. Lots of companies are looking at faster fast charging speeds (up to 800 kW in Porsche’s case) but they won’t be trivial to implement for a number of reasons.

    One aspect of EV use that’s unintuitive to a lot of people is that filling up to 80% (or wherever fast charging stops), rather than 100%, is often the most convenient move.

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      dal20402,

      100% agreed on your 80% comment (or even 60% or less – basically what it is going to take to get home or to your overnight charge location). People don’t realize that the amperage for most vehicles tapers off as the battery fills – it’s not linear.

      Two other concepts that aren’t immediately apparent:
      – Do not put the EV charging spots in “premium” parking locations – if you do, similar to handicapped spots, you set yourself up for a lifetime of conflict.
      – An EV charger which is accessible from 2-3-4 nearby parking spots is incredibly useful. You charge, no need to move your car, I can still charge, person after me can charge.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Yes on both points.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          “– Do not put the EV charging spots in “premium” parking locations”

          Sometimes, it’s an issue with running the wiring a longer distance vs. close to the building. ICE’ing is becoming less of an issue as more people become aware of EVs. I haven’t seen it in a while.

          “– An EV charger which is accessible from 2-3-4 nearby parking spots is incredibly useful.”

          That’s true. I even have an auto-unlock feature that allows my car to be unplugged once charged. 120v 20a outlets and NEMA 14-50 220v outlets are inexpensive alternatives and work fine. At the office, I tend to skip the J1772 chargers and plug into the outlets since I’m there long enough to get enough of a charge out of the outlets and don’t have to deal with moving the car after a couple of hours.

  • avatar
    jeoff

    Driving a Fusion Energi —Most of my miles are electric just charging at home with a regular outlet. What I would want is more storage and a spare tire.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    PG&E (Pacific Gas and Electric) pulled the plug on half the grid in the Bay Area earlier this month due to the threat of wild fires. I could take some comfort in knowing my cars were gassed up so I could leave town if necessary, or power my generator for several days by siphoning the tanks. This won’t be possible in the EV utopia our overlords have planned for us.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      The utopia is for the overlords. The rest of those Bay Area folks will be dodging poop and needles on the sidewalk.

    • 0 avatar
      SPPPP

      A charged battery is useful too. More planning ahead required, I guess. But gas stations go empty pretty fast when situations get grim.

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      Depending on the length of the power outage, it could be very useful to run critical appliances (freezer, refrigerator, etc.) using the vehicle as a power source.

      Using a generator, you are limited to the run time of the generator. You could run low load from the vehicle for a relatively longer time.

      (Plus we all know that generator noise attracts zombies.)

    • 0 avatar
      Steve S.

      You know that gas pumps are powered by electricity, right?

      • 0 avatar
        SPPPP

        Some gas stations have backup generators, which of course have an abundant fuel supply right there. But with or without generators, if push comes to shove, lack of electricity will not stop people from getting gas out of a storage tank.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    “Among people who already own or want to purchase electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids, 48 percent say that a lack of charging stations is one of their main concerns”

    So say people who have never even driven an EV. In 4 years of driving an EV as my DD, I think I’ve visited maybe 6 charging stations in the wild.

    Range anxiety is real, but there are other meaningful barriers to entry. You could have charging stations on every corner, but then charging time becomes a complaint because nobody has time to let their car charge overnight.

    Ultimately, purchase price and range are always a complaint, since the majority of EV critics drive 500 miles a day in $15k cars.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    I am interested to see the customer response to this vehicle (if they don’t pull a Dyson and back out). Presumably, it’s not a Tesla, therefore it is awesome.

    “FordPass Charging Network” might be an unfortunate name choice… as in “Ford? Pass…”

    The issue I ran into in the early days of EV’s was that my network card is not compatible with the charging network that you partnered with, or the partner changed and the password isn’t updated, or the fast charger I was counting on is out of service, or the fast charger that I see right over there is in the part of the parking lot that is reserved for a special event today….

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      It’s just a matter of time before every charging network takes every smartphone payment system, with discounts for members (or whatever they call people who have signed up and/or paid in advance).

  • avatar

    Here is yet another overhyped EV vehicle that will virtually disappear within five years. Doesn’t Ford realize nobody asked for a electric Mustang SUV?

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